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dr.smart

El Dorado, AR

#1 Jan 1, 2012
Should Arkansas allow people to use marijuana for medical uses
Yes

Springdale, AR

#2 Jan 2, 2012
Yes, I think so. I am not a pot head, and never use pot. But I know people that smoke it because it helps relieve pain. Only use it for that use.
non smoker

United States

#3 Jan 2, 2012
It should be legal...
Hunt-Myers

United States

#4 Jan 2, 2012
Without it, I would never have made it through chemo.
HELLO

Camden, AR

#5 Jan 2, 2012
Well of course.
Safer than alcohol and showing promise in the medical world.
And besides, God made it.
Star Scream

El Dorado, AR

#6 Jan 2, 2012
I suggest Arkansas should follow the Canadian model of extracting oil from hemp. It is a multi-billion dollar industry annually for Canada, and could very well save the farms of south and east Arkansas.
Wont happen

El Dorado, AR

#7 Jan 2, 2012
One reason it won't happen.
Big Pharma. Legalized, marijuana would hit them so hard they'd be closing doors.
Pain relief drugs, the most abused medicines in the world, would be cut by a large percentage. You are talking hundreds of billions of dollars lost to a plant.
It is a weed, far too easy for anyone to grow. They want products manufactured in labs, synthesized by man, paid for by insurance/.gov.
typical

Canton, TX

#8 Jan 2, 2012
Wont happen wrote:
One reason it won't happen.
Big Pharma. Legalized, marijuana would hit them so hard they'd be closing doors.
Pain relief drugs, the most abused medicines in the world, would be cut by a large percentage. You are talking hundreds of billions of dollars lost to a plant.
It is a weed, far too easy for anyone to grow. They want products manufactured in labs, synthesized by man, paid for by insurance/.gov.
And it would severely hurt the timber industry as it would be easier to manufacture paper. It doesn't matter about saving lives from overdose or accidents. It's all about that almighty dollar. Sad.
non smoker

United States

#9 Jan 2, 2012
Welcome to the land of the so called free... Which we are not.... You got to have a government issued permit or pay for a license to do anything here ...
Your only free as long as you have the money to pay the fees...
As for myself the good ol USA is not what our forefathers in visioned ...
To say the least...

I am sick of this crap...

The politicians and candidates represent no one but big industry or the uber rich...

Look at the up coming candidates , everyone of them are a joke...
HELLO

Camden, AR

#10 Jan 2, 2012
typical wrote:
<quoted text>
And it would severely hurt the timber industry as it would be easier to manufacture paper. It doesn't matter about saving lives from overdose or accidents. It's all about that almighty dollar. Sad.
That makes no sense. Trees and the paper industry go together.
Better start thinking about all those plastic bags that are predicted to lie there for 600 years, or maybe longer.
pothead

El Dorado, AR

#11 Jan 2, 2012
[QUOTE who="dr.smart"]Shoul d Arkansas allow people to use marijuana for medical uses[/QUOTE]

Absolutely!!*coughs*
Oh Yea

El Dorado, AR

#12 Jan 2, 2012
YES!!!!! Legalize it!!! Or atleast have medical in AR
typical

Canton, TX

#13 Jan 2, 2012
HELLO wrote:
<quoted text>
That makes no sense. Trees and the paper industry go together.
Better start thinking about all those plastic bags that are predicted to lie there for 600 years, or maybe longer.
And if marijuana was legalized, it would go with the paper industry. And what would happen to timber? It's the main reason why marijuana became illegal in the 1930s in the first place.
HELLO

Camden, AR

#14 Jan 2, 2012
typical wrote:
<quoted text>
And if marijuana was legalized, it would go with the paper industry. And what would happen to timber? It's the main reason why marijuana became illegal in the 1930s in the first place.
You should have stayed on the weed. I see you're having irrational flashbacks.
dumb

El Dorado, AR

#15 Jan 2, 2012
Now what on earth would the cops have to do if weed became legal? That is about all they are good for now: A good drug bust!!! Do not get me wrong, we need to get drugs off the streets and out of the hands of kids, but get serious? The cops need to be equally concerned about other areas of this town AND county. Sure, someone will get on here and say that they are, but I will never agree.
Medical pot could have it's advantages, but I highly doubt it in this small town. It would just get abused, and we would see more cops down and Shipley's or out farting around on the tax payers dime.
-

Canton, TX

#16 Jan 2, 2012
dumb wrote:
Now what on earth would the cops have to do if weed became legal? That is about all they are good for now: A good drug bust!!! Do not get me wrong, we need to get drugs off the streets and out of the hands of kids, but get serious? The cops need to be equally concerned about other areas of this town AND county. Sure, someone will get on here and say that they are, but I will never agree.
Medical pot could have it's advantages, but I highly doubt it in this small town. It would just get abused, and we would see more cops down and Shipley's or out farting around on the tax payers dime.
Not to mention all you see them doing at night is jacking local wi fi and just playing on their laptops ...
typical

Canton, TX

#17 Jan 3, 2012
HELLO wrote:
<quoted text>
You should have stayed on the weed. I see you're having irrational flashbacks.
Not on it and never have been. I see you need to brush up on your history. Look it up.
HELLO

Camden, AR

#18 Jan 3, 2012
typical wrote:
<quoted text>
Not on it and never have been. I see you need to brush up on your history. Look it up.
Not trying to start a war about this because it's a little off-topic and I think we both agree about the original poster's question.
It just sound a little like conspiracy-theory paranoia. IMO.
twiddle dumb

El Dorado, AR

#19 Jan 3, 2012
- wrote:
<quoted text>
Not to mention all you see them doing at night is jacking local wi fi and just playing on their laptops ...
It is most annoying to see them on their laptops! I have witnessed this often.. Cops should be working, not playing on computer.
typical

Canton, TX

#20 Jan 3, 2012
HELLO wrote:
<quoted text>
Not trying to start a war about this because it's a little off-topic and I think we both agree about the original poster's question.
It just sound a little like conspiracy-theory paranoia. IMO.
www.dailynebraskan.com/2.3915/legailizing-wee...

"Marijuana's illegality is a matter of business history. In 1937, the marijuana tax was passed with help from anti-hemp newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst. The ferocious and corrupt Hearst had significant financial interest in the timber industry, and when it was found that hemp - cannabis grown for NON-DRUG USE - could be made into a stronger paper, he fought for a ban on cannabis plants completely by printing frivolous newspaper stories warning of marijuana's dangers. The bill passed, due in large part of his financial support and, as they say, the rest is history."

"In 2003, when the National Office of Drug Control Policy reported the Government was spending $29 Billion annually to prosecute and incarcerate marijuana users, the negative public response to the report sparked the largest interest in the pro-weed cause ever. In 2006, a Time/CNN poll stated 72% of Americans supported marijuana decriminalization, which reduces marijuana-use penalties to fines alone."

www.thc-ministry.net/untoldstory/hemp_5.html

"For the first 162 years of America's existence, marijuana was totally legal and hemp was a common crop. But during the 1930s, the US government and the media began spreading outrageous lies about marijuana, which led to its prohibition. In 1936, the liquor industry funded the infamous movie titled 'Reefer Madness.' This movie depicts a man going insane from smoking marijuana, and then killing his entire family with an ax.

Shortly before marijuana was banned by the Marijuana Tax Act in 1937, new technologies were developed that made hemp a potential competitor with the newly-founded synthetic fiber and plastic industries. Hemp's potential for producing paper also posed a threat to the timber industry. Evidence suggests that commercial interests having MUCH TO LOSE from hemp competition helped propagate reefer madness hysteria, and used their influence to lobby for Marijuana Prohibition.

After Alcohol Prohibition ended in 1933, funding for the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (now DEA) was reduced. The director, Harry Anslinger, then became a leading advocate for Marijuana Prohibition, which now has become a government industry that receives billions of tax dollars to enforce Marijuana Prohibition."

As I stated, look it up. It's not a conspiracy. It's common sense, as it's revenue generation for federal employees.

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