Despite calls to slow down, NRC grant...

Despite calls to slow down, NRC grants Vermont Yankee license renewal

There are 359 comments on the Boston Herald story from Mar 21, 2011, titled Despite calls to slow down, NRC grants Vermont Yankee license renewal. In it, Boston Herald reports that:

ONTPELIER, Vt. - Federal regulators today gave the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant a 20-year license renewal, despite calls for reconsideration following the nuclear disaster in Japan.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Boston Herald.

The NRC is a joke

Newport, NH

#293 Mar 25, 2013
BDV wrote:
So, make up your mind, joke-dude. Can nuclear be made safer or not? If not, why should be billions be spent putting lipstick on a sow?
In my opinion, no nuclear power cannot be made safe. From mining, to refining, to fuel fabrication, to multiple examples of failed containment, to a total lack of responsible planning in regard to the extremely dangerous, highly radioactive used fuel that will be a very expensive and potentially deadly liability for 100,000 years, nuclear power has failed at every level.

The nuclear industry has had more than 50 years and billions of taxpayer dollars to prove itself and has nothing to show after all of this time and money but a lot of leaking plants, abandoned mines, radioactive landfills and thousands of tons of "depleted" uranium munitions permanently poisoning our land, air and water. Radioactive waste that the public will have to pay to manage for many thousands of years, for some it will cost them their lives.

The manner in which our nuclear industry is currently being manged is criminal, the NRC is being manipulated by the very industry it is supposed to be regulating and the public is being kept in the dark and left out of the decision making process.

It should be considered a criminal act when a company recklessly soups up a half century old antique of a reactor to run at 120%, leaks millions of gallons of radioactive waste laced with tritium, Strontium-90, cesium-137, zinc-65, manganese-54, and cobalt-60 to name a few, denies that it has underground pipes that carry said radioactive waste, then makes a half-hearted attempt to clean it up.

But it was somehow not against the law. None of the employees who were responsible for this gross negligence or the many Entergy representatives who "miscommunicated" in front of state and federal officials under sworn testimony were ever arrested and the company was never even fined a penny.

The NRC is a joke and the nuclear industry has clearly demonstrated that profit is more important than public safety. They have no problem taking their profit and leaving the taxpayers with a 100,000 year radioactive fuel legacy and countless, expensive polluted mines, refineries, battlefields and radioactive dumps to manage indefinitely.

It is high time we end this madness.
The NRC is a joke

Newport, NH

#294 Mar 25, 2013
NRC Plays Keep Away...
http://www.fairewinds.com/content/nrc-plays-k...
march_21_2013

" Critical safety documents are continuously withheld from the public with a total lack of openness and transparency.

Fairewinds founder Maggie Gundersen and Enformable's Editor Lucas Hixson meet with Kevin Hurley to discuss the difficulties the public has in obtaining information from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from reactor owners. The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has been a failure in allowing the public to have access to information that affects the safety of their communities. "

listen to the podcast:
http://www.fairewinds.com/content/nrc-plays-k...
BDV

Brookline, MA

#295 Mar 25, 2013
Unfortunately you conveniently leave out the few thousand trillion kwh produced by the object of your scorn - which incidentally were produced with zero cents ending in British oil company, petroshaikh pockets.
.
Nuclear power has financed 0 (zero) terrorists, unlike its main competitor - oil.
industrial terrorism

Newport, NH

#296 Mar 28, 2013
The nuclear industry places profit over public safety, to me and millions of others, it is industrial terrorism!
industrial terrorism

Newport, NH

#297 Mar 28, 2013
Google reveals views of Japan's nuclear ghost town
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/...
By Harumi Ozawa

"Visitors to Google Maps can now roam virtually through the overgrown streets of an abandoned town where time has stood still since a tsunami crippled Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant two years ago.

The Internet giant's mapping site is offering views of the deserted streets of Namie, half of which sits within the 20-kilometre (12-mile) no-go zone around the nuclear plant, wrecked when the 2011 tsunami crashed into Japan.

With cooling systems knocked out by the wall of water, three reactors melted down, spewing radioactive particles into the air, soil and sea and forcing Namie's entire population of 21,000 to flee.

The entrance ban will be lifted for a small part of the town from Monday next week, allowing residents to visit for a short time, but the vast majority remains highly contaminated and is expected to be uninhabitable for years.

"The world is moving on to the future after the disaster... but time has stopped in the town of Namie," said mayor Tamotsu Baba, writing on a blog for Google Japan Thursday.

"I hope these street views will show the people of future generations what the great earthquake and nuclear disaster brought," he said.

"We need many years and many people's cooperation to rise again from the nuclear crisis. We will never give up on getting back our hometown," he said.

The natural disasters killed nearly 19,000 people, including those whose bodies are yet to be recovered.

Some parts of the town were swamped by the waves of March 11. Houses and other buildings damaged by the water can be clearly seen as site visitors click through the panoramic displays.

Along the coastline, the occasional boat lies in an untended field, dumped there by the waves that spread heavy oils and silt over rice paddies, where they also left the now rotted bodies of marine life.

But many of the buildings in the town are intact, tinged only by the invisible menace of radiation and abandoned when the sudden order to evacuate came two years ago.

Plant pots, their contents long dead or run wild, stand neatly outside some houses. Barber shops and hairdressers still display their welcome signs, offering haircuts to customers who may never return.

The images come from a heavily polluted part of the town, where residents are not allowed to venture, a town official told AFP.

"The town requested special approval for the Google crew to enter the zone," the official said. "The crew wore protective gear and stayed inside the car while shooting."

Mayor Baba, who asked Google to come into his town, said he wanted the world to see what it looked like and wanted those who had been forced out to be able to virtually visit the places they grew up.

"Even two years after the disaster, we cannot walk into Namie freely," the mayor said. "Many people from the town say they want to see what state their hometown is in now.

"I am sure many people around the world will want to see the tragedy a nuclear accident can bring."

Tens of thousands of people in the area were forced from their homes by the nuclear catastrophe, the worst the planet has seen since the 1986 disaster at Chernobyl.

No one is officially recorded as having died as a direct result of the radiation, but scientists warn some areas may remain contaminated for decades, while those most heavily polluted could be uninhabitable forever."

The Street View function can be accessed through the map, which can be found here:

http://goo.gl/VbxDY
industrial terrorism

Newport, NH

#298 Mar 28, 2013
About half of the fuel used in US plants has come from the megatons to megawatts program produced in the Mayak nuclear complex in Chelyabinsk, Russia the most radioactively polluted place on earth.

Some more responsible countries like Switzerland have stopped using products produced there because they continue to dump radioactive byproducts into the already hopelessly polluted Techa river and have repeatedly disallowed international nuclear safety inspectors. http://www.wise-uranium.org/epeur.html#CHGEN

When you hear ignorant people preach how "clean" nuclear is, think of all of the uranium mines being recklessly run in third world nations, the 70 or so old leaking plants that threaten to poison the USA permanently, the thousands of tons of "depleted" uranium munitions that will pollute the deserts of the middle-east forever and remember the people of Chelyabinsk.

Watch:
Chelyabinsk: The Most Contaminated Spot on the Planet (1996)
Terror

Newport, NH

#299 Mar 28, 2013
Terror

Newport, NH

#300 Mar 28, 2013
BDV

Columbia, SC

#301 Apr 2, 2013
Yes, the horrorist terror of the terrorist horror of nuclear power...
.
Nuclear nightmares, like the huge BP uranium spill in the Gulf of Mexico ... no wait, that was oil.
.
The uranium mine mass death accidents scores of dead in US and hundreds of thousands dead worldwide ... no wait, that's coal mine explosions.
.
Who can forget the huge uranium refinery blazes that killed scores in the US?... no, that was petroleum refinery fires.
.
I wish there was a good reason to shun nuclear - but there isn't. All there is, is the propaganda machine sponsored by Big Oil, part of the operation that keeps the world indentured to Her Majesty's British Petroleum and Royal Shell.
.
Proves once again that you cannot keep people chained if they don't want it themselves. Well, enjoy gasoline at 10,...20,...30 US$ a gallon, fellas!
John

Decorah, IA

#302 Apr 2, 2013
Physicist and radiologist, Wade Allison, points out that the scientific literature does not carry even one report of a one time dose of 100 millisieverts or less causing an increase in cancer incidence or any other harmful health effect. In the case of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation a hundred millisieverts per month causes no ill effect to health. In fact chronic radiation below 100 millisieverts per month improves health by lowering the probability of cancer. It also primes the immune system to ward off other diseases. Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are living much longer than other Japanese not exposed to bomb fallout. For every 100 bomb survivor living to 80 years only 38 of the non-exposed population in Japan live to 80 year.
Dan

Upton, NY

#303 Apr 2, 2013
industrial terrorism wrote:
About half of the fuel used in US plants has come from the megatons to megawatts program produced in the Mayak nuclear complex in Chelyabinsk, Russia the most radioactively polluted place on earth.
Wrong, there are no plants in the US currently burning MOX fuel, Duke power had their licencse agreement ammended to allow trial burning using up to 4 MOX assemblies but the amendment expired in 2008 and was never renewed. MOX is currently produced in France and the UK and used in European reactors, Japan was also a user of MOX assemblies.

MOX and disposition of weapons plutonium
Under the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement, Russia and the USA agreed in 2000 to each dispose of (or immobilise) 34 tonnes of weapons-grade plutonium deemed surplus to requirements (see page on Military Warheads as a Source of Nuclear Fuel). The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site in the US state of South Carolina began construction in August 2007 and will convert the US plutonium to MOX fuel. Expected to begin operations in 2016, the MFFF is designed to turn 3.5 t/yr of weapons-grade plutonium into MOX fuel assemblies, which will be loaded at Duke Energy's Catawba and McGuire plants. The contract to design, build and operate the MFFF was awarded to the Shaw AREVA MOX Services consortium in 1999, with the $2.7 billion construction option being exercised in May 2008.4 Four MOX fuel lead test assemblies manufactured from US weapons plutonium and fabricated at the Melox plant in France were successfully burned on a trial basis at the Catawba plant.

Meanwhile, following several years of dispute, in November 2007 the USA and Russia agreed that Russia would dispose of its 34 t of weapons-grade plutonium by conversion to MOX fuel, which would be burned in the BN-600 reactor at the Beloyarsk nuclear plant, and in the BN-800 under construction at the same site.5 Under this plan, Russia would begin disposition in the BN-600 reactor in the 2012 timeframe. Disposition in the BN-800 would follow soon thereafter. Once disposition begins, the two reactors could dispose of approximately 1.5 t of Russian weapons plutonium per year. The USA agreed to contribute $400 million to the project. The MOX fuel will be manufactured at a plant that is planned to be built at Seversk, Siberia – though no firm plans for its construction currently exist. However, a 60 t/yr commercial MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is scheduled to start up at Zheleznogorsk by 2014, operated by the Mining & Chemical Combine (MCC). It will make MOX granules and 400 pelletised MOX fuel assemblies per year for the BN-800 and future fast reactors. The capacity is designed to supply five BN-800 units. This is likely to use ex-weapons plutonium.

Just because you say something does not make it true!
Megatons to Megaleaks

Newport, NH

#304 Apr 5, 2013
Dan wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong, there are no plants in the US currently burning MOX fuel, Duke power had their licencse agreement ammended to allow trial burning using up to 4 MOX assemblies but the amendment expired in 2008 and was never renewed. MOX is currently produced in France and the UK and used in European reactors, Japan was also a user of MOX assemblies...
...Just because you say something does not make it true!
Perhaps if you had even bothered to read the Megatons to Megawatts program Wiki before looking foolish...

Megatons to Megawatts Program
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megatons_to_Mega...

"The Megatons to Megawatts Program is the name given to the program that implemented the 1993 United States-Russia nonproliferation agreement to convert high-enriched uranium (HEU) taken from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons into low-enriched-uranium (LEU) for nuclear fuel." ...

..."Based on market prices, USEC estimates that by the completion of the 20 year Megatons to Megawatts program in 2013, USEC will have paid Russia more than $8 billion for its purchases of the SWU component in shipments of low-enriched-uranium fuel." ...

... "Nuclear warheads that were once on Russian ICBMs aimed at American cities are now providing 50% of the electricity produced by America's nuclear power plants" ...
Megatons to Megaleaks

Newport, NH

#305 Apr 5, 2013
John wrote:
Physicist and radiologist, Wade Allison, points out that the scientific literature does not carry even one report of a one time dose of 100 millisieverts or less causing an increase in cancer incidence or any other harmful health effect. In the case of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation a hundred millisieverts per month causes no ill effect to health. In fact chronic radiation below 100 millisieverts per month improves health by lowering the probability of cancer. It also primes the immune system to ward off other diseases. Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are living much longer than other Japanese not exposed to bomb fallout. For every 100 bomb survivor living to 80 years only 38 of the non-exposed population in Japan live to 80 year.
Please, this absurd Ann Coulter nuclear industry talking point again?

Radiation hormesis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation_hormes...

"Radiation hormesis (also called radiation homeostasis) is the hypothesis that low doses of ionizing radiation (within the region and just above natural background levels) are beneficial, stimulating the activation of repair mechanisms that protect against disease, that are not activated in absence of ionizing radiation. The reserve repair mechanisms are hypothesized to be sufficiently effective when stimulated as to not only cancel the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation but also inhibit disease not related to radiation exposure (see hormesis).[1][2][3][4] This counter-intuitive hypothesis has captured the attention of scientists and public alike in recent years.[5]

Quoting results from a literature database research, the Académie des Sciences — Académie nationale de Médecine (French Academy of Sciences — National Academy of Medicine) stated in their 2005 report concerning the effects of low-level radiation that many laboratory studies have observed radiation hormesis.[6][7] However, they cautioned that it is not yet known if radiation hormesis occurs outside the laboratory, or in humans.[8]

While the effects of high and acute doses of ionising radiation are easily observed and understood in humans (e.g. Japanese Atomic Bomb survivors), the effects of low-level radiation are very difficult to observe and highly controversial. This is because baseline cancer rate is already very high and the risk of developing cancer fluctuates 40% because of individual life style and environmental effects,[9][10] obscuring the subtle effects of low-level radiation. An acute dose of 100 mSv may increase cancer risk by ~0.8%.

Consensus reports by the United States National Research Council and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) argue that there is no evidence for hormesis in humans and in the case of the National Research Council, that hormesis is outright rejected as a possibility." ...
The NRC is a joke

Newport, NH

#306 Apr 5, 2013
Fukushima Radioactive Fallout in California and Alaska: Health Impacts on American Children
http://www.globalresearch.ca/fukushima-radioa...
By John Upton April 03, 2013

"Fallout from that Fukushima meltdow?It’s not just the Japanese who are suffering, though their plight is obviously the worst.

Radioactive isotopes blasted from the failed reactors may have given kids born in Hawaii and along the American West Coast health disorders which, if left untreated, can lead to permanent mental and physical handicaps.

Children born in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington between one week and 16 weeks after the meltdowns began in March 2011 were 28 percent more likely to suffer from congenital hypothyroidism than were kids born in those states during the same period one year earlier, a new study shows. In the rest of the U.S. during that period in 2011, where radioactive fallout was less severe, the risks actually decreased slightly compared with the year before.

Substantial quantities of the radioisotope iodine-131 were produced by the meltdowns, then wafted over the Pacific Ocean and fell over Hawaii, the American West Coast, and other Pacific countries in rain and snow, reaching levels hundreds of times greater than those considered safe. https://www.baycitizen.org/news/environmental...

After entering our bodies, radioactive iodine gathers in our thyroids. Thyroids are glands that release hormones that control how we grow. In babies, including those not yet born, such radiation can stunt the development of body and brain. The condition is known as congenital hypothyroidism. It is treatable when detected early.

“Fukushima fallout appeared to affect all areas of the U.S., and was especially large in some, mostly in the western part of the nation,” wrote researchers with the Radiation and Public Health Project http://www.radiation.org/ in their peer-reviewed paper published in Open Journal of Pediatrics. http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation...

The links between iodine radioisotope exposure and juvenile hypothyroidism were established after the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown. The authors of this new paper suspect that the spike in Pacific Coast cases in 2011 was linked to the Fukushima accident, but they warn that further analysis is needed “to better understand any association between iodine exposure from Fukushima-Dai-ichi and congenital hypothyroidism risk.”

Their findings may be only a tip of an epidemiological iceberg.

“Congenital hypothyroidism can be used as one measure to assess any potential changes in U.S. fetal and infant health status after Fukushima because official data was available relatively promptly,” the researchers wrote.“However, health departments will soon have available for other 2010 and 2011 indicators of fetal/infant health, including fetal deaths, premature births, low weight births, neonatal deaths, infant deaths, and birth defects.”

So stay tuned. Two years and one month after the meltdown, we’re only just beginning to understand how the nuclear catastrophe affected the health of people living around the vast Pacific Ocean."
BDV

Brookline, MA

#307 Apr 6, 2013
How high was the exposure?
BDV

Brookline, MA

#308 Apr 6, 2013
Was bouncer ronni correction applied? What else happened?
(Dietary changes in particular).
BDV

Brookline, MA

#309 Apr 8, 2013
And of course, what's this have to do with vermont yankee?
Dan

Upton, NY

#310 Apr 9, 2013
Megatons to Megaleaks wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps if you had even bothered to read the Megatons to Megawatts program Wiki before looking foolish...
Megatons to Megawatts Program
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megatons_to_Mega...
"The Megatons to Megawatts Program is the name given to the program that implemented the 1993 United States-Russia nonproliferation agreement to convert high-enriched uranium (HEU) taken from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons into low-enriched-uranium (LEU) for nuclear fuel." ...
..."Based on market prices, USEC estimates that by the completion of the 20 year Megatons to Megawatts program in 2013, USEC will have paid Russia more than $8 billion for its purchases of the SWU component in shipments of low-enriched-uranium fuel." ...
... "Nuclear warheads that were once on Russian ICBMs aimed at American cities are now providing 50% of the electricity produced by America's nuclear power plants" ...
Perhaps if you new anything about the Mayak nuclear complex you would understand my answer. Mayak only dealt with Plutonium weapons disposition. Plutonium blended with Uranium is called Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel the only fuel that has been blended and used is HEU weapons fuel which is easily down blended and burned in light water reactors. Use of MOX fuel requires specific reviews and adjustments to the license for its use. As of 2013 the facility in Russia and the one being built at Savannah river have not been completed and not a single MOX fuel bundle (from weapons plutonium) has been manufactured and burned in a US reactor.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOX_fuel
http://www.nti.org/analysis/articles/plutoniu...
http://www.armscontrol.org/print/2326
http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Nuclear-Fue...
http://nnsa.energy.gov/sites/default/files/nn...
http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections...
http://www.nti.org/gsn/article/higher-mox-fue...
Megatons to Megaleaks

Newport, NH

#311 Apr 9, 2013
Dan wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps if you new anything about the Mayak nuclear complex you would understand my answer. Mayak only dealt with Plutonium weapons disposition." ...
http://www.elp.com/articles/2001/09/5000-nucl...

..."Nuclear Weapons Conversion: How It's Done-

The conversion from warhead HEU to LEU fuel takes place at several Russian nuclear installations and begins with the removal of nuclear warheads from dismantled Russian strategic and tactical nuclear weapons.

Component Removal: At the Siberian Chemical Enterprise (formerly Tomsk-7) in Seversk and the Mayak Production Association near Ozersk, the HEU metal components are removed from the warheads and machined into metal shavings. The shavings are heated and converted to an HEU oxide form and any contaminants are chemically removed.

Fluorination: At the Siberian Chemical Enterprise and the Electrochemical Plant near Krasnoyarsk, the HEU oxide is converted to highly enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6), a compound that becomes a gas when heated.

Dilution: At the Siberian Chemical Enterprise, the Electrochemical Plant and the Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant near Ekaterinburg, the highly enriched UF6 is introduced into a gaseous process stream. There, it mixes with other material and is diluted to less than 5 percent concentration, a level too low to be of any military value but ideal for producing electric power.

Transfer to Cylinders: At the three dilution facilities, the now low-enriched UF6 fuel is transferred to 2.5-ton steel cylinders, then enclosed in shipping containers and taken to a collection point in St. Petersburg, Russia. USEC takes possession of the fuel containers in St. Petersburg, where it is shipped to USEC's facilities in the United States.

Arrival in Portsmouth: At USEC's Portsmouth facility in Ohio, the LEU is tested to ensure that it meets appropriate commercial and customer specifications. If necessary, the enrichment level of the uranium fuel can be further adjusted to meet utility customers' needs.

Shipment to Fabricators: Based on customer instructions, USEC ships the LEU to fabricators (Global Nuclear Fuel, Framatome or Westinghouse) for fabrication into fuel assemblies. The assemblies are then shipped to utility customers as a fuel source for their nuclear reactors.

USEC Inc., a global energy company, is the world's supplier of enriched uranium fuel for commercial nuclear power plants."
Megatons to Megaleaks

Newport, NH

#312 Apr 9, 2013
The fallacy of the Megatons to Megawatts program
By Pavel Podvig | 23 July 2008
http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/column...

"ew U.S.-Russian cooperation efforts are more popular and less controversial than the "Megatons to Megawatts" program, also known as the HEU-LEU deal, which converts Russia's highly enriched uranium (HEU) from nuclear weapons into low-enriched uranium (LEU) for U.S. nuclear power reactors. Under the agreement that the countries signed in 1993, Moscow made a commitment to eliminate 500 metric tons of HEU--probably more than one-third of the total HEU stock that the Soviet Union produced during the Cold War. About 340 metric tons of HEU has already been converted into LEU, and the Russian uranium currently provides one-half of U.S. nuclear power, or about 10 percent of the country's electricity supply.

If 30 metric tons of HEU is downblended each year, the program will reach its goal in 2013, the year the initial agreement is set to expire. This raises the question, "What next?" In the United States, the HEU-LEU deal is universally viewed as a great success. Therefore, it's not surprising that there's been no shortage of proposals to accelerate the rate of downblending or to extend the program beyond its original deadline.

Because the U.S.-Russian HEU-LEU deal is implemented in a way that substantially increases the risk of theft of weapon-grade material, extending it would be wrongheaded."

Russia has been skeptical about these proposals, in part because the economics of the deal doesn't exactly favor Moscow. Rosatom, the government corporation that regulates the Russian nuclear complex, is on record saying that it has no intention of continuing to downblend HEU after 2013. Still, many in the United States believe that with the right combination of incentives and minor changes in the program's structure, Washington could (and should) prod Moscow into eliminating more HEU.

But because the deal is implemented in a way that substantially increases the risk of theft of weapon-grade material, extending it would be wrongheaded.

A recent Energy Department press release maintains, "Every kilogram of HEU eliminated under the HEU Purchase Agreement is one that will not require sustained security upgrades and can never be stolen for use in a crude terrorist weapon." Unfortunately, this isn't the case. Instead, almost every kilogram of HEU that's eliminated is taken from a reasonably secured storage area and put on a train for transport, where the risk of it being stolen is much higher. At least one-half of these transfers aren't necessary.

Most of the uranium used in the program comes from nuclear weapons, which are removed from centralized storage sites administered by the Ministry of Defense and brought to a disassembly facility in the closed city of Lesnoy. Next, the uranium and plutonium from the weapons are sent to the Mayak facility in Ozersk and the Siberian Chemical Combine in Seversk, where the uranium is purified and converted into uranium oxide. This highly enriched uranium oxide is still a sensitive weapon-grade material. Mayak then sends all of its uranium oxide to Seversk and Zelenogorsk, where it's converted to uranium hexafluoride to prepare it for the final downblending. But HEU shipments don't stop here--instead of downblending all of the highly enriched uranium hexafluoride on-site, Seversk sends most of it to another facility in Novouralsk. All told, HEU in various forms moves thousands of miles across Russia by train." ...

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