FBi, mob, bodies, graveyard, Colombo

FBi, mob, bodies, graveyard, Colombo

There are 35 comments on the Newsday story from Oct 2, 2008, titled FBi, mob, bodies, graveyard, Colombo. In it, Newsday reports that:

FBI agents spent their first full day digging yesterday at an East Farmingdale site that, according to sources, is described by an informant as an organized crime burial ground since at least 1994.

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Just Saying

Laurel, MD

#26 Oct 3, 2008
TUFF GUY wrote:
Lived the good life until he got caught now he's an informant!!! what a joke. Take your punishment like a man and rat everyone out, what happen to death before dishonor??? long gone I guess
It's easy to sit back and tell someone else to be a tough guy, and keep his mouth shut to protect those who haven't been caught. However, if you're the one who's facing many years in jail, while your fellow crooks are out enjoying the good life, keeping your mouth shut doesn't seem like such a good idea anymore. The idea of cooperating in order to reduce your sentence looks attractive, especially when the same wiseguys who tell you to keep quiet and do your time don't lift a finger to help your family financially while you're locked up. That's not very "honorable" of them, is it? Why should you protect them while you and your family suffer, especially if they had more of a role in the crime than you did? That's the reality of why more and more mobsters are talking these days after they're caught.
Just Saying

Laurel, MD

#27 Oct 3, 2008
PETEF wrote:
We don't know what this guy knows or says he knows. One thing I will say is that if they don't find any bodies the FBI will say - there are signs a body was once there and has since been removed. Maybe that is when they threw Wild Bill into the Atlantic Ocean. We will just have to wait and see.
The use of informants is a disgrace to what this country is supposed to stand for. In the federal system it is even more of a disgrace as the informant need not have his information corroborated by independant testimony.
In the NYC detective case it was Anthony Casso that informed on the detectives. Not even the federal government could make this guy credible. Fact is that Casso wrote a letter to the defense counsels that he made it up about three murders. So what does the FEDS do? They bring in another criminal to 'corroborate' Casso, and by not bringing in Casso to testify, somehow have his 'testimony' corroborated by Kaplan.
Those cops were a disgrace to their profession, and guilty as sin. Also, what Kaplan said was corroborated by other evidence. Remember that Casso wasn't the only one who pointed the finger at these guys, others did over a period of years. Besides, who else do you think will have direct knowledge of what a crook does besides another crook? Without informants, you can't make these cases. And if an informant was the only one present to witness a criminal act, how would you corroborate that with "independent testimony"? You couldn't, which is why guys walk in the state system, and not in the federal system. But that's okay with you, right?
Steve

New York, NY

#28 Oct 3, 2008
TUFF GUY wrote:
At this point you are right noone would be surprised, I do believe however at some point in time way back when those who were in did live by the death before dishonor rule, I am sure there are some old saltys still left out there as well and the others are doing their time like men<quoted text>
Men do not do time. Criminals and scum do time.

To glorify those in jail is wrong because it adds romance to the crimes, hurt and killings they've done.

A real man works had for a living at a decent job and takes care of his woman and his kids.

Real contribute to the community, lead by example and give back to the world.

There is no glory in doing time...no honor in incarceration because if there were it would justify crime.

I don't know if you've ever been a victim of a shake-down by those [email protected], but crime ruins the lives of innocent people.

No real men do time.

“Jacob's Sookie”

Since: Nov 07

Hamilton,Va SOBX

#29 Oct 3, 2008
Omerta wrote:
<quoted text>
The entire story of the mob and the Mafia is a complete myth. The average IQ is well below normal. Those that have some brains are just plain crazy.
If you take their lifetime earnings and divide by years worked they barely reach average earnings for a low-skill job. Most spend more than half their life in and out of jail.
How much would I have to pay you to spend two years in a max security facility? Watch some reality jail shows before you answer.
Don't know about your IQ theory.
My deceased G Uncle's were with Hoffa's MYTH.
They lived a happy and horse racing life.
These men were Scholars but, loved the life.
Maggie

Flagstaff, AZ

#30 Oct 3, 2008
Prior to moving to Texas, I lived in Farmingdale from the 1990s to 2005. I lived right off of Melville Rd. There were alot of individuals that were rumored as being in the "mafia" living in my neighborhood.
Miami Joes

AOL

#31 Oct 3, 2008
now that's what I call organized crime.
Miami Joes

AOL

#32 Oct 3, 2008
my favorite actor.
Essendo un film di mafia, peraltro uno dei migliori (e il miglior Scorsese in assoluto), non è scevro da scene di violenza, fin dall'inizio. Violenza molto secca, dura, che arriva improvvisa come gli scatti d'ira del personaggio di Joe Pesci e riporta la nostra attenzione sullo scorrere degli eventi, in caso ci fossimo distratti ad osservare la perfezione stilistica del film. In questo caso è la tecnica cinematografica che la pellicola mette in mostra, sia da parte della troupe che da parte del cast, che regala agli spettatori le emozioni che questo tipo di film sa trasmettere. E se il modo in cui Scorsese narra il finale può far storcere qualche naso,è indubbio che le parole di Ray Liotta con cui il film si chiude rappresentino tutto fuorché un happy ending.
ansman

AOL

#33 Oct 3, 2008
hmmmmm, I think I'll order a canoli and a large pie..
Frank

Brooklyn, NY

#34 Oct 3, 2008
Bum Advice from a SNICH wrote:
This guy is looking for a deal and making up stories to get a better
deal ! Be careful you don't hit and old cesspool ?
Here's pretty much how it works with the Feds and informants: no body, no deal. Plain and simple
Chaos

New York, NY

#36 Oct 3, 2008
Leave the gun, take the canolis'
Shakey

Albrightsville, PA

#37 Oct 4, 2008
Anthony Spero, A former consiglieri for the Bonanno Family died this past week in prison. IN PRISON! So up until very recently there were and are members of Cosa Nostra that do in fact adhere to old world codes.
Frank

Brooklyn, NY

#39 Oct 4, 2008
Shakey wrote:
Anthony Spero, A former consiglieri for the Bonanno Family died this past week in prison. IN PRISON! So up until very recently there were and are members of Cosa Nostra that do in fact adhere to old world codes.
They're what's called "suckers" or "dumb guinees", take your pick.
Mr Zippy

AOL

#41 Oct 5, 2008
Miami Joes wrote:
my favorite actor.
Essendo un film di mafia, peraltro uno dei migliori (e il miglior Scorsese in assoluto), non è scevro da scene di violenza, fin dall'inizio. Violenza molto secca, dura, che arriva improvvisa come gli scatti d'ira del personaggio di Joe Pesci e riporta la nostra attenzione sullo scorrere degli eventi, in caso ci fossimo distratti ad osservare la perfezione stilistica del film. In questo caso è la tecnica cinematografica che la pellicola mette in mostra, sia da parte della troupe che da parte del cast, che regala agli spettatori le emozioni che questo tipo di film sa trasmettere. E se il modo in cui Scorsese narra il finale può far storcere qualche naso,è indubbio che le parole di Ray Liotta con cui il film si chiude rappresentino tutto fuorché un happy ending.
I always like Joe Pesci. I wanted him for MNF instead of Madden. As to my most favorite actor,,,Robert Di nero and Al. I loved that series the 'Sopranos' also. In fact, I like all people who don't take crap from others.
Run262

Pearl River, NY

#42 Oct 5, 2008
Maggie wrote:
Prior to moving to Texas, I lived in Farmingdale from the 1990s to 2005. I lived right off of Melville Rd. There were alot of individuals that were rumored as being in the "mafia" living in my neighborhood.
Didn't we have a drink at the Changing Times?

SUNY Farmingdale has built up like crazy. All new dorms and a minor-league baseball team. The new ballfields replaced the jogging track.
always right

Bangkok, Thailand

#43 Oct 5, 2008
Maybe they will find Hoffa TOO!.

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