worried

Van Buren, IN

#1 Jul 10, 2012
Is anyone else concerned about the amount of water that is being used to irrigate fields? The aquafir under us here won't last forever and it does not replenish itself. Clean water is essential. Just concerned.
guest

Dyersburg, TN

#2 Jul 10, 2012
worried wrote:
Is anyone else concerned about the amount of water that is being used to irrigate fields? The aquafir under us here won't last forever and it does not replenish itself. Clean water is essential. Just concerned.
Where do you think the rain goes? You idiot.
Worried

Winchester, IN

#3 Jul 12, 2012
Well I don't think the rain will replenish an aqua-fir YOU IDIOT.
Worried

Winchester, IN

#4 Jul 12, 2012
Why is it on Dburg forum tht people are so rude. Its a forum. There is always some smart mouth. Most other forums are not like this one.
Tells me a lot bout people here. For Dburg its just another means of gossip
guest

Dyersburg, TN

#5 Jul 12, 2012
Why wouldn't rain replenish an aquifer? How do you think the water got there to begin with? The rain. You're probably one of these idiots that think carbon dioxide is killing the earth.
Worried

Ponchatoula, LA

#6 Jul 12, 2012
I am no expert. However, I don't want to argue either. Good day.
Readabook

Martin, TN

#7 Jul 12, 2012
Aquifers may occur at various depths. Those closer to the surface are not only more likely to be used for water supply and irrigation, but are also more likely to be topped up by the local rainfall.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquifer
Worried

Dubois, IN

#8 Jul 13, 2012
Groundwater recharge or deep drainage or deep percolation is a hydrologic process where water moves downward from surface water to groundwater. This process usually occurs in the vadose zone below plant roots and is often expressed as a flux to the water table surface. Recharge occurs both naturally (through the water cycle) and through anthropogenic processes (i.e., "artificial groundwater recharge"), where rainwater and or reclaimed water is routed to the subsurface.

Groundwater is recharged naturally by rain and snow melt and to a smaller extent by surface water (rivers and lakes). Recharge may be impeded somewhat by human activities including paving, development, or logging. These activities can result in enhanced surface runoff and reduction in recharge. Use of groundwaters, especially for irrigation, may also lower the water tables. Groundwater recharge is an important process for sustainable groundwater management, since the volume-rate abstracted from an aquifer in the long term should be less than or equal to the volume-rate that is recharged.

It does ssy that such activities can reduce 'recharge'.
UH -OH

Sioux City, IA

#9 Jul 13, 2012
SO IF THEIR IS NO WATER IRRIGATION WHAT WILL DO WHAT TO THE FOOD SUPPLY IF THERE IS NO RAIN ?????
guest

Ripley, TN

#10 Jul 13, 2012
It is something that needs to be studied by a hydrologist because I don't really want to be drinking from the Forked Deer or Mississippi.

“It's sackcloth and ashes time.”

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

#11 Jul 13, 2012
Sink holes maybe?

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