Va. House candidate talks crime and education

May 16, 2009 Full story: Potomac News 61

The multicolored poster on the wall to the left of Albert Williams seemed especially appropriate after he spoke.

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Dinah

Dumfries, VA

#42 Aug 30, 2009
I smell an NEA plant.
Dinah

Dumfries, VA

#43 Aug 30, 2009
Ralph wrote:
<quoted text>are a unhappy person or disgrutled ex teacher who could not handle the job?
WOW, you just gave me the best compliment! No, I have never been a teacher in the public schools. I was an active parent in my children's education.

"Happy" has nothing to do with it. It's about time we stopped treating our children like things and started treating them like the PEOPLE they are. Putting MONEY first is not putting them first. Sorry. Wise to your tricks.
derick

Richmond, VA

#44 Aug 30, 2009
Do not not respond to idiots. Dinah dum...
derick

Richmond, VA

#45 Aug 30, 2009
Frank wrote:
Aim school money at state classrooms
School funding formulas are a convoluted concoction of goals, ranging from pressing to perplexing, all glued together by great globs of desperation. When the economy is strong, governors and lawmakers target popular programs or areas where schools have demonstrated weaknesses. When the economy sours, formulas are tweaked to survive the crisis, with less thought to long-term implications.
The result is neither perfect nor sacred.
Faced with the unavoidable need to cut education funding, Gov. Tim Kaine last year proposed a revision to Virginia's Standards of Quality formula that would cap state funding for support staff, which covers administrators, clerical workers, instructional aides, library staff, custodians, technology specialists and guidance counselors. Under his plan the state would help cover the cost of one support staffer for roughly every four teachers.
Without that cap, state aid for public schools would increase $893 million in the 2010-12 budget. With the cap, the state's obligation would grow by just $139 million.
No one pretends this is a happy solution. Virtually all cities and counties spend more than the Standards of Quality formula requires. State leaders have an incentive to keep the standards artificially low because it saves them money, but the burden for covering the true cost of education falls heavily on property taxes as a consequence.
When state aid is reduced, smaller, poorer schools suffer the most and inequities in the system become more pronounced.
Kaine nevertheless makes a rational argument in favor of a support staff cap. Ratios already guide state funding for instructional positions, so it makes sense that similar formulas be established for nonteaching positions.
The governor also points to an uptick in the number of support workers in recent years. That increase is partly due to increasing federal regulation and the growing number of students requiring special education. Schools have been forced to hire more clerical workers to handle the paperwork so teachers are free to focus on students with learning disabilities.
But a preliminary analysis suggests that the old funding formula may influence school hiring decisions in unexpected ways. A consulting firm hired by the Department of Education found that schools have increased their reliance on instructional aides in the classroom. There is conflicting research on whether aides have a positive impact on student achievement, with much of the variation due to differing training requirements. The proper mix of teachers and aides should be determined by academic performance, not by anomalies in a funding formula that cap the number of teachers but not aides.
While Kaine's justification for creating a support staff cap has some merit, the ratio he suggests is largely driven by the size of the hole in the state budget, not by best practices. Finding a perfect formula, however, is an impossible task. Only a handful of states fund schools based on personnel ratios. Most establish cost-per-student formulas. Virginia incorporates elements from both methods, but under Kaine's plan the state is shifting more toward top-down decision-making that reduces flexibility at the local level.
When paired with adequate funding, greater state control can ensure that all students receive a consistent, equitable education. In the absence of adequate funding, it's fair to question whether state leaders should be calling the shots.
Kaine has proposed an imperfect change to an imperfect school-financing system.
Even as they struggle this year to balance their budgets, state education leaders must commit themselves to finding a better way. Spending decisions should be driven by innovation and academic excellence, not arcane equations.
Source URL (retrieved on 08/19/2009 - 21:31):
I agree
derick

Richmond, VA

#46 Aug 30, 2009
Dinah wrote:
I smell an NEA plant.
so!
derick

Richmond, VA

#47 Aug 30, 2009
Dinah wrote:
<quoted text>
WOW, you just gave me the best compliment! No, I have never been a teacher in the public schools. I was an active parent in my children's education.
"Happy" has nothing to do with it. It's about time we stopped treating our children like things and started treating them like the PEOPLE they are. Putting MONEY first is not putting them first. Sorry. Wise to your tricks.
he forgot to add racist
henry

Richmond, VA

#48 Aug 30, 2009
Cary wrote:
This needs to be researched!
I agree
princess j

Richmond, VA

#49 Aug 31, 2009
Frank wrote:
Aim school money at state classrooms
School funding formulas are a convoluted concoction of goals, ranging from pressing to perplexing, all glued together by great globs of desperation. When the economy is strong, governors and lawmakers target popular programs or areas where schools have demonstrated weaknesses. When the economy sours, formulas are tweaked to survive the crisis, with less thought to long-term implications.
The result is neither perfect nor sacred.
Faced with the unavoidable need to cut education funding, Gov. Tim Kaine last year proposed a revision to Virginia's Standards of Quality formula that would cap state funding for support staff, which covers administrators, clerical workers, instructional aides, library staff, custodians, technology specialists and guidance counselors. Under his plan the state would help cover the cost of one support staffer for roughly every four teachers.
Without that cap, state aid for public schools would increase $893 million in the 2010-12 budget. With the cap, the state's obligation would grow by just $139 million.
No one pretends this is a happy solution. Virtually all cities and counties spend more than the Standards of Quality formula requires. State leaders have an incentive to keep the standards artificially low because it saves them money, but the burden for covering the true cost of education falls heavily on property taxes as a consequence.
When state aid is reduced, smaller, poorer schools suffer the most and inequities in the system become more pronounced.
Kaine nevertheless makes a rational argument in favor of a support staff cap. Ratios already guide state funding for instructional positions, so it makes sense that similar formulas be established for nonteaching positions.
The governor also points to an uptick in the number of support workers in recent years. That increase is partly due to increasing federal regulation and the growing number of students requiring special education. Schools have been forced to hire more clerical workers to handle the paperwork so teachers are free to focus on students with learning disabilities.
But a preliminary analysis suggests that the old funding formula may influence school hiring decisions in unexpected ways. A consulting firm hired by the Department of Education found that schools have increased their reliance on instructional aides in the classroom. There is conflicting research on whether aides have a positive impact on student achievement, with much of the variation due to differing training requirements. The proper mix of teachers and aides should be determined by academic performance, not by anomalies in a funding formula that cap the number of teachers but not aides.
While Kaine's justification for creating a support staff cap has some merit, the ratio he suggests is largely driven by the size of the hole in the state budget, not by best practices. Finding a perfect formula, however, is an impossible task. Only a handful of states fund schools based on personnel ratios. Most establish cost-per-student formulas. Virginia incorporates elements from both methods, but under Kaine's plan the state is shifting more toward top-down decision-making that reduces flexibility at the local level.
When paired with adequate funding, greater state control can ensure that all students receive a consistent, equitable education. In the absence of adequate funding, it's fair to question whether state leaders should be calling the shots.
Kaine has proposed an imperfect change to an imperfect school-financing system.
Even as they struggle this year to balance their budgets, state education leaders must commit themselves to finding a better way. Spending decisions should be driven by innovation and academic excellence, not arcane equations.
Source URL (retrieved on 08/19/2009 - 21:31):
long overdue good ides!!!!
Dinah

Dumfries, VA

#50 Aug 31, 2009
derick wrote:
Do not not respond to idiots. Dinah dum...
Huhm.. note you're all from Richmond with no substance in your posts. Co incidence?
Dinah

Dumfries, VA

#51 Aug 31, 2009
Pay no attention to her, my darling.
Dinah

Dumfries, VA

#52 Aug 31, 2009
derick wrote:
<quoted text>so!
It's a stinkweed.
Dinah

Dumfries, VA

#53 Aug 31, 2009
derick wrote:
<quoted text>he forgot to add racist
WHAT racist comment did I make? Do you even know what the definition of "racist" is.
otis

Richmond, VA

#54 Aug 31, 2009
Frank wrote:
Aim school money at state classrooms
School funding formulas are a convoluted concoction of goals, ranging from pressing to perplexing, all glued together by great globs of desperation. When the economy is strong, governors and lawmakers target popular programs or areas where schools have demonstrated weaknesses. When the economy sours, formulas are tweaked to survive the crisis, with less thought to long-term implications.
The result is neither perfect nor sacred.
Faced with the unavoidable need to cut education funding, Gov. Tim Kaine last year proposed a revision to Virginia's Standards of Quality formula that would cap state funding for support staff, which covers administrators, clerical workers, instructional aides, library staff, custodians, technology specialists and guidance counselors. Under his plan the state would help cover the cost of one support staffer for roughly every four teachers.
Without that cap, state aid for public schools would increase $893 million in the 2010-12 budget. With the cap, the state's obligation would grow by just $139 million.
No one pretends this is a happy solution. Virtually all cities and counties spend more than the Standards of Quality formula requires. State leaders have an incentive to keep the standards artificially low because it saves them money, but the burden for covering the true cost of education falls heavily on property taxes as a consequence.
When state aid is reduced, smaller, poorer schools suffer the most and inequities in the system become more pronounced.
Kaine nevertheless makes a rational argument in favor of a support staff cap. Ratios already guide state funding for instructional positions, so it makes sense that similar formulas be established for nonteaching positions.
The governor also points to an uptick in the number of support workers in recent years. That increase is partly due to increasing federal regulation and the growing number of students requiring special education. Schools have been forced to hire more clerical workers to handle the paperwork so teachers are free to focus on students with learning disabilities.
But a preliminary analysis suggests that the old funding formula may influence school hiring decisions in unexpected ways. A consulting firm hired by the Department of Education found that schools have increased their reliance on instructional aides in the classroom. There is conflicting research on whether aides have a positive impact on student achievement, with much of the variation due to differing training requirements. The proper mix of teachers and aides should be determined by academic performance, not by anomalies in a funding formula that cap the number of teachers but not aides.
While Kaine's justification for creating a support staff cap has some merit, the ratio he suggests is largely driven by the size of the hole in the state budget, not by best practices. Finding a perfect formula, however, is an impossible task. Only a handful of states fund schools based on personnel ratios. Most establish cost-per-student formulas. Virginia incorporates elements from both methods, but under Kaine's plan the state is shifting more toward top-down decision-making that reduces flexibility at the local level.
When paired with adequate funding, greater state control can ensure that all students receive a consistent, equitable education. In the absence of adequate funding, it's fair to question whether state leaders should be calling the shots.
Kaine has proposed an imperfect change to an imperfect school-financing system.
Even as they struggle this year to balance their budgets, state education leaders must commit themselves to finding a better way. Spending decisions should be driven by innovation and academic excellence, not arcane equations.
Source URL (retrieved on 08/19/2009 - 21:31):
this is a good article and I concur.
sharon

Richmond, VA

#55 Aug 31, 2009
JLARC has already said schools wre underfunded
Allen

Richmond, VA

#56 Sep 2, 2009
long overdue. Present funding scheme old fashion
terence

San Leandro, CA

#57 Sep 2, 2009
Frank wrote:
Aim school money at state classrooms
School funding formulas are a convoluted concoction of goals, ranging from pressing to perplexing, all glued together by great globs of desperation. When the economy is strong, governors and lawmakers target popular programs or areas where schools have demonstrated weaknesses. When the economy sours, formulas are tweaked to survive the crisis, with less thought to long-term implications.
The result is neither perfect nor sacred.
Faced with the unavoidable need to cut education funding, Gov. Tim Kaine last year proposed a revision to Virginia's Standards of Quality formula that would cap state funding for support staff, which covers administrators, clerical workers, instructional aides, library staff, custodians, technology specialists and guidance counselors. Under his plan the state would help cover the cost of one support staffer for roughly every four teachers.
Without that cap, state aid for public schools would increase $893 million in the 2010-12 budget. With the cap, the state's obligation would grow by just $139 million.
No one pretends this is a happy solution. Virtually all cities and counties spend more than the Standards of Quality formula requires. State leaders have an incentive to keep the standards artificially low because it saves them money, but the burden for covering the true cost of education falls heavily on property taxes as a consequence.
When state aid is reduced, smaller, poorer schools suffer the most and inequities in the system become more pronounced.
Kaine nevertheless makes a rational argument in favor of a support staff cap. Ratios already guide state funding for instructional positions, so it makes sense that similar formulas be established for nonteaching positions.
The governor also points to an uptick in the number of support workers in recent years. That increase is partly due to increasing federal regulation and the growing number of students requiring special education. Schools have been forced to hire more clerical workers to handle the paperwork so teachers are free to focus on students with learning disabilities.
But a preliminary analysis suggests that the old funding formula may influence school hiring decisions in unexpected ways. A consulting firm hired by the Department of Education found that schools have increased their reliance on instructional aides in the classroom. There is conflicting research on whether aides have a positive impact on student achievement, with much of the variation due to differing training requirements. The proper mix of teachers and aides should be determined by academic performance, not by anomalies in a funding formula that cap the number of teachers but not aides.
While Kaine's justification for creating a support staff cap has some merit, the ratio he suggests is largely driven by the size of the hole in the state budget, not by best practices. Finding a perfect formula, however, is an impossible task. Only a handful of states fund schools based on personnel ratios. Most establish cost-per-student formulas. Virginia incorporates elements from both methods, but under Kaine's plan the state is shifting more toward top-down decision-making that reduces flexibility at the local level.
When paired with adequate funding, greater state control can ensure that all students receive a consistent, equitable education. In the absence of adequate funding, it's fair to question whether state leaders should be calling the shots.
Kaine has proposed an imperfect change to an imperfect school-financing system.
Even as they struggle this year to balance their budgets, state education leaders must commit themselves to finding a better way. Spending decisions should be driven by innovation and academic excellence, not arcane equations.
Source URL (retrieved on 08/19/2009 - 21:31):
very good
George O

San Leandro, CA

#59 Sep 19, 2009
please explain?
Andy K

Hayward, CA

#60 Sep 26, 2009
Interesting
Dinah

Dumfries, VA

#61 Oct 10, 2009
debbie wrote:
Virginia refuse to let go of the past.
Sorry. I notice you have nothing to say. Why write? Or is it to you like " Frank" says "This is America." Vacuous.
Chris c

Woodbridge, VA

#62 Aug 14, 2010
Illegals need to be subtracted from the equation of school for legal immigrants and native citizens all together. Anchor babies need to be deported with their parents.

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