U.S. Lags World in Grasp of Genetics ...

U.S. Lags World in Grasp of Genetics and Acceptance of Evolution

There are 14 comments on the LiveScience story from Aug 10, 2006, titled U.S. Lags World in Grasp of Genetics and Acceptance of Evolution. In it, LiveScience reports that:

A comparison of peoples' views in 34 countries finds that the United States ranks near the bottom when it comes to public acceptance of evolution.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at LiveScience.

Hoosier Jarhead

AOL

#1 Aug 11, 2006
The US lags behind in science education due to the influence of religion in public schools and public school curricula.

Even where religion has had no legal standing, they have, in the past and even today in some instances, pressure schools to no present the subject of evolution. This is still the alternate plan of those who are trying to put Intelligent Design Creationism into public schools.

If they cannot get their story into the schools, they reason that evolution should not be taught either, since evolution (as they present it) is based on the same kind of evidence as ID.

Here are the results of the survey, which asked the question, "Human beings, as we know them, developed from earlier species of animals."

The study found that over the past 20 years:

The percentage of U.S. adults who accept evolution declined from 45 to 40 percent.
The percentage overtly rejecting evolution declined from 48 to 39 percent, however.
And the percentage of adults who were unsure increased, from 7 to 21 percent.

This data reflects an increase by 14%, those who just don't know, and a decrease of 9% for those who won't "overtly" reject evolution.

Both figures point to a lack of information or education in regard to evolution science.

The battle is on now. No longer can school districts surpress evolution with impunity. Stickers in text books qualifying evolution as a guess at best and religion disguised as science are found to be clearly against the Constitution, as they always have been.

Washington, Adamns, Jefferson and Madison would be proud.
Roar

Killeen, TX

#2 Aug 11, 2006
Hoosier Jarhead wrote:
The US lags behind in science education due to the influence of religion in public schools and public school curricula.
Even where religion has had no legal standing, they have, in the past and even today in some instances, pressure schools to no present the subject of evolution. This is still the alternate plan of those who are trying to put Intelligent Design Creationism into public schools.
If they cannot get their story into the schools, they reason that evolution should not be taught either, since evolution (as they present it) is based on the same kind of evidence as ID.
Here are the results of the survey, which asked the question, "Human beings, as we know them, developed from earlier species of animals."
The study found that over the past 20 years:
The percentage of U.S. adults who accept evolution declined from 45 to 40 percent.
The percentage overtly rejecting evolution declined from 48 to 39 percent, however.
And the percentage of adults who were unsure increased, from 7 to 21 percent.
This data reflects an increase by 14%, those who just don't know, and a decrease of 9% for those who won't "overtly" reject evolution.
Both figures point to a lack of information or education in regard to evolution science.
The battle is on now. No longer can school districts surpress evolution with impunity. Stickers in text books qualifying evolution as a guess at best and religion disguised as science are found to be clearly against the Constitution, as they always have been.
Washington, Adamns, Jefferson and Madison would be proud.
Didn't deanoff post this? Either way it's sad. But whats really disturbing is -

"If they cannot get their story into the schools, they reason that evolution should not be taught either, since evolution (as they present it) is based on the same kind of evidence as ID."

Really..........
Sleep of Reason

Philadelphia, PA

#3 Aug 12, 2006
Hoosier Jarhead wrote:
The US lags behind in science education due to the influence of religion in public schools and public school curricula.
Even where religion has had no legal standing, they have, in the past and even today in some instances, pressure schools to no present the subject of evolution. This is still the alternate plan of those who are trying to put Intelligent Design Creationism into public schools.
If they cannot get their story into the schools, they reason that evolution should not be taught either, since evolution (as they present it) is based on the same kind of evidence as ID.
Here are the results of the survey, which asked the question, "Human beings, as we know them, developed from earlier species of animals."
The study found that over the past 20 years:
The percentage of U.S. adults who accept evolution declined from 45 to 40 percent.
The percentage overtly rejecting evolution declined from 48 to 39 percent, however.
And the percentage of adults who were unsure increased, from 7 to 21 percent.
This data reflects an increase by 14%, those who just don't know, and a decrease of 9% for those who won't "overtly" reject evolution.
Both figures point to a lack of information or education in regard to evolution science.
The battle is on now. No longer can school districts surpress evolution with impunity. Stickers in text books qualifying evolution as a guess at best and religion disguised as science are found to be clearly against the Constitution, as they always have been.
Washington, Adamns, Jefferson and Madison would be proud.
I think that this shift is also a reflection of changes in class structure, educational funding and a movement away from the classic ideals of a liberal** education toward a more vocational model. Any way you slice it, it's still bad news. The Chinese are lean, hungry and ready to learn from our best scientists -- and they are. From what I can see, they make up a disproportionately large segment of our research community. As a nation they lack the stupid, jingoistic, and theistically justified complacency that has gripped this country and are preparing to take the upper hand. They understand that in the arena of capitalistic competition those who master the material realm have a profound advantage, while we seem to be increasingly embracing the wonders of theocracy and the horrific suffering and squalor it brings with it (something with which our islamic bretheren are well acquainted). China is not Japan. We are not going to regain the economic losses we endure at their hands as we did with Japan if we lose the torch. And they have their hands on it.

**Calm down conservatives, I don't necessarily mean poliically liberal.
Hoosier Jarhead

AOL

#4 Aug 12, 2006
Sleep of Reason wrote:
<quoted text>
I think that this shift is also a reflection of changes in class structure, educational funding and a movement away from the classic ideals of a liberal** education toward a more vocational model. Any way you slice it, it's still bad news. The Chinese are lean, hungry and ready to learn from our best scientists -- and they are. From what I can see, they make up a disproportionately large segment of our research community. As a nation they lack the stupid, jingoistic, and theistically justified complacency that has gripped this country and are preparing to take the upper hand. They understand that in the arena of capitalistic competition those who master the material realm have a profound advantage, while we seem to be increasingly embracing the wonders of theocracy and the horrific suffering and squalor it brings with it (something with which our islamic bretheren are well acquainted). China is not Japan. We are not going to regain the economic losses we endure at their hands as we did with Japan if we lose the torch. And they have their hands on it.
**Calm down conservatives, I don't necessarily mean poliically liberal.
Good points, we have too many parents who say "I didn't learn anything useful in science or literature, why teach it? Teach more "practical stuff." We can only wonder what the "practical stuff" is.

There was recently another article regarding the greater number of Japanese and Chinese who are graduation with science degrees, as opposed to Americans.

Speaking of liberals, the founding fathers were liberals. They thought that everyone, not just the priveleged, should have certain freedoms.

Conservative thought at the time was represented by a political party that thought we should keep our relationship with England as it was and that we shouldn't make waves.

The liberals won out, and here we are.
Hoosier Jarhead

AOL

#5 Aug 14, 2006
And more data from the California Academy of Sciences...

While crucial social, economic, and health issues now facing the public are being profoundly influenced by new scientific research, a startling number of Americans cannot answer even basic scientific questions:

More than half of all American adults (53%) do not know that the Earth goes around the Sun once a year.
Nearly half (48%) do not have a sense of what percentage of the Earth's surface is covered by water.
And 42% can't answer correctly when asked if the earliest humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs.
Nearly 1 in 5 people (19%) couldn't answer any of these questions correctly.

A little anecdote to boot...
(True story)
A lady in a graduare level literature class I was attending couldn't understand Elizabethan beliefs regarding the cosmos because she "kept getting confused as to whether it was the sun or the moon that goes around the earth."

When the Professor dismissed the class he suggested that she take an elective class in solar astronomy.

She said that, "I just don't find things like that interesting."

She is now a tenured English Lit teacher in the public school system.
Sleep of Reason

Philadelphia, PA

#6 Aug 14, 2006
Hoosier Jarhead wrote:
And more data from the California Academy of Sciences...
While crucial social, economic, and health issues now facing the public are being profoundly influenced by new scientific research, a startling number of Americans cannot answer even basic scientific questions:
More than half of all American adults (53%) do not know that the Earth goes around the Sun once a year.
Nearly half (48%) do not have a sense of what percentage of the Earth's surface is covered by water.
And 42% can't answer correctly when asked if the earliest humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs.
Nearly 1 in 5 people (19%) couldn't answer any of these questions correctly.
A little anecdote to boot...
(True story)
A lady in a graduare level literature class I was attending couldn't understand Elizabethan beliefs regarding the cosmos because she "kept getting confused as to whether it was the sun or the moon that goes around the earth."
When the Professor dismissed the class he suggested that she take an elective class in solar astronomy.
She said that, "I just don't find things like that interesting."
She is now a tenured English Lit teacher in the public school system.
Another little anecdote (also a true story). A man operating under the pretense that a biochemical event occurring when a sperm fuses with an ovum becomes imbued with a magical spark of being, opted to quash all federal funding on these magic cells because they "have at least the potential for life."
He is now the President of the United States.
Hoosier Jarhead

AOL

#7 Aug 14, 2006
When Ronald Reagan ran for President in 1980, he addressed a group of ministers in Texas and said, in regard to evolution...

"Well, it's a theory--it is a scientific theory only, and it has in recent years been challenged in the world of science and is not yet believed in the scientific community to be as infallible as it was once believed."

Then some years later another Presidential candidate from Texas said...

"On the issue of evolution, the verdict is still out on how God created the Earth."

One has to be embarassed for them and hope that it the former case it was campaign rhetoric and in the latter misstated, but that is hoping for too much.
Sleep of Reason

Philadelphia, PA

#8 Aug 14, 2006
The latter misstated? This came from a man who also said: "I mean, after all, religion has been around a lot longer than Darwinism ... I believe God did create the world. And I think we're finding out more and more and more as to how it actually happened." Sometimes I feel like I'm taking crazy pills.
PCD

New York, NY

#9 Aug 14, 2006
Hoosier Jarhead wrote:
One has to be embarassed for them and hope that it the former case it was campaign rhetoric and in the latter misstated, but that is hoping for too much.
Unfortunately, a quick study of the history of the powerful excludes embarrassment as an overwhelmingly relevant phenomenon in their lives.

The meek shall inherit indeed.
School of Thought

Los Angeles, CA

#10 Feb 1, 2012
Even where religion has had no legal standing, they have, in the past and even today in some instances, pressure schools to no present the subject of evolution. This is still the alternate plan of those who are trying to put Intelligent Design Creationism into public schools.
MIDutch

Waterford, MI

#11 Feb 2, 2012
School of Thought wrote:
Even where religion has had no legal standing, they have, in the past and even today in some instances, pressure schools to no present the subject of evolution. This is still the alternate plan of those who are trying to put Intelligent Design Creationism into public schools.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/08/science/08c...

From the article:

"That leaves what the authors call “the cautious 60 percent,” who avoid controversy by endorsing neither evolution nor its unscientific alternatives. In various ways, they compromise."

60% of high school science teachers across the country do not teach the Theory of Evolution properly in order to avoid conflict with students and parents ... incredible.

Outside of "radical muslim" countries, does this happen anywhere else on Earth? My guess is no. In this regard, the United States is on par with the most backwards countries on the planet.

Since: Jan 12

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

#12 Feb 2, 2012
MIDutch wrote:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/08/science/08c...
From the article:
"That leaves what the authors call “the cautious 60 percent,” who avoid controversy by endorsing neither evolution nor its unscientific alternatives. In various ways, they compromise."
60% of high school science teachers across the country do not teach the Theory of Evolution properly in order to avoid conflict with students and parents ... incredible.
Outside of "radical muslim" countries, does this happen anywhere else on Earth? My guess is no. In this regard, the United States is on par with the most backwards countries on the planet.
Yes America has the largest creationist population in the western developed world. The reason is because our country has historically been protestant with a large baptist population who are bible literalists. The best way to fight creationism is to educate the future generation in evolution and stop brainwashing in creationist garbage.
MIDutch

Waterford, MI

#13 Feb 2, 2012
Wat the Tyler wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes America has the largest creationist population in the western developed world. The reason is because our country has historically been protestant with a large baptist population who are bible literalists. The best way to fight creationism is to educate the future generation in evolution and stop brainwashing in creationist garbage.
That would be nice, but despite the fact that the SCIENCE is winning the research and empirical evidence battles by a an IMMENSE margin and winning most of the legal battles, the anti science crowd seem to be winning the public relations and marketing battles in many parts of the country.

“...sigh”

Since: Nov 09

Smithtown, NY

#14 Mar 6, 2012
Sad, isn't it?

It's because we're loaded with ignorant fundees.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Dover Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News York victims of sexual assault struggle for peace (Apr '13) Mar 3 Struggleright 3
News To march or not? Some women are staying away be... Jan '17 SallyMarch 1
News Did colonial courthouse windows end up in the D... Jan '17 Gofigure 1
News Wrightsville Forming Own Police Department (Nov '06) Dec '16 Jon 17
Is Testerone XL good for building muscle? Oct '16 Nerie 1
Skin whitening G4M glutathione for men celebrities Oct '16 Nikko 1
Love me anti aging cream reviews Oct '16 Laine 1

Dover Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Dover Mortgages