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anonymous

Chicago, IL

#1 Jan 31, 2014
How is it the Midlothian Country Club continues to get credit for "founding" Midlothian when they didn't become a part of the Village until the Bremen Heights annexation in the 1950's and the train station was given to the Rock Island right after it was built? Even R.K. Cummings was employed by Rock Island and not the Midlothian and Blue Island Railroad which was not owned by the Midlothian Country Club, but rather a few of its members? Lastly, records suggest it was the Arthur T. McIntosh Company and John H. Robinson who created the two subdivisions that primarily made up Midlothian in 1927? Since the Country Club has always been self-sufficient and in no need of any community support, nor has it ever brought visitor traffic to the local businesses at any time in it's history, shouldn't the real individuals who built the Village get credit for "founding" the Village? Just curious of other opinions.
his story

Midlothian, IL

#2 Jan 31, 2014
Is written by the victors....

What is the source of your info???
Really

Midlothian, IL

#3 Jan 31, 2014
anonymous wrote:
How is it the Midlothian Country Club continues to get credit for "founding" Midlothian when they didn't become a part of the Village until the Bremen Heights annexation in the 1950's and the train station was given to the Rock Island right after it was built? Even R.K. Cummings was employed by Rock Island and not the Midlothian and Blue Island Railroad which was not owned by the Midlothian Country Club, but rather a few of its members? Lastly, records suggest it was the Arthur T. McIntosh Company and John H. Robinson who created the two subdivisions that primarily made up Midlothian in 1927? Since the Country Club has always been self-sufficient and in no need of any community support, nor has it ever brought visitor traffic to the local businesses at any time in it's history, shouldn't the real individuals who built the Village get credit for "founding" the Village? Just curious of other opinions.
the village took its name from the country club. There was just a milk stop at Rexford crossing.
WTF

Alsip, IL

#4 Feb 1, 2014
Really wrote:
<quoted text>the village took its name from the country club. There was just a milk stop at Rexford crossing.
You are absolutely correct. Please refer to this link at Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midlothian,_Illi...
WTF

Alsip, IL

#5 Feb 1, 2014
Really

Ashburn, VA

#6 Feb 1, 2014
WTF wrote:
<quoted text>
You are absolutely correct. Please refer to this link at Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midlothian,_Illi...
thank you.
anonymous

Chicago, IL

#7 Feb 1, 2014
Wikipedia is quite unreliable. With that said, I have a variety of sources I pulled from:

1. The 100 year anniversary book published by the Midlothian Country Club

2. An article by Larry Plano entitled "The Midlothian and Blue Island Railroad

3. The 1959 Annual Report published by the Village under President Henry J. Milen

4. A series of news articles published in the Bremen Township News-Record from 1955 to 1958

There were a few other sources suggesting it was named after the Country Club, however a Midlothian Association was created in 1924 as part of the effort to incorporate the village in which there is no evidence this particular name was chosen due to the Country Club and that the founders could have been fans of Sir Walter Scott, but they also could have been inspired by some of Ettinger's swine (over 200 of his stock had Midlothian in their name) or they could have just as equally been inspired by a thoroughbred (Midlothian showed up in the US in the 1870's and had quite a few champion offspring). So far there is no true evidence proving the village was named in honor of the Midlothian Country Club or even the train station and that it remains only an assumption.

A note regarding the 1959 Annual Report, credit is due to the Milen Administration for publishing a full breakdown of where tax dollars go 60 years before Cook County had to be bullied into including the information in property tax bills.
WTF

Alsip, IL

#8 Feb 2, 2014
anonymous wrote:
Wikipedia is quite unreliable. With that said, I have a variety of sources I pulled from:
1. The 100 year anniversary book published by the Midlothian Country Club
2. An article by Larry Plano entitled "The Midlothian and Blue Island Railroad
3. The 1959 Annual Report published by the Village under President Henry J. Milen
4. A series of news articles published in the Bremen Township News-Record from 1955 to 1958
There were a few other sources suggesting it was named after the Country Club, however a Midlothian Association was created in 1924 as part of the effort to incorporate the village in which there is no evidence this particular name was chosen due to the Country Club and that the founders could have been fans of Sir Walter Scott, but they also could have been inspired by some of Ettinger's swine (over 200 of his stock had Midlothian in their name) or they could have just as equally been inspired by a thoroughbred (Midlothian showed up in the US in the 1870's and had quite a few champion offspring). So far there is no true evidence proving the village was named in honor of the Midlothian Country Club or even the train station and that it remains only an assumption.
A note regarding the 1959 Annual Report, credit is due to the Milen Administration for publishing a full breakdown of where tax dollars go 60 years before Cook County had to be bullied into including the information in property tax bills.
I was only trying to help answer your original question:

"How is it the Midlothian Country Club continues to get credit for "founding" Midlothian when they didn't become a part of the Village until the Bremen Heights annexation in the 1950's and the train station was given to the Rock Island right after it was built?"

The information I provided does not give the Country Club any credit for founding Midlothian. It just says that the name was taken from it.
Obviously, you've done a very good job researching this topic and I applaud for it. With that said, there's not much more I can add.
Hopefully you'll find the answers to your own questions and enlighten the rest of us.

Thanks for all your efforts.
Midlo History

Chicago, IL

#9 Feb 2, 2014
It was 1965 when Bremen Heights and the Country Club were annexed into Midlothian. Spring of 66 is when the stated putting in the Sewers and Water for a charge of $500.00 per home owner to be paid in installments. Country Club at the time reused the improvements because they didn't want the inconvience of the Lawns and streets torn up.
anonymous

Chicago, IL

#10 Feb 2, 2014
To Really and WTF: I apologize if I implied you were not trying to help-a negative side-effect of text only conversation I suppose. I am certainly struggling with defining what it means to "found" a community, but "finding" an area doesn't seem the same as directly contributing to building it's infrastructure.

As for when the annexation happened, that's an interesting twist, especially since the articles I was able to find talked about the Attorney General initially getting involved because the first proposal included land that was not contiguous to the existing Village, thereby making the proposal "illegal." Unfortunately, the local library archives only has papers from around 1955 through 1959 for the News Record so I was unable to anchor the exact date of the actual annexation.

So basically it took almost 10 years for the annexation to go through? Also, what do you mean that they "reused" the improvements...or did you mean they refused them?(From experience auto-correct sucks!)
Midlo History

Chicago, IL

#11 Feb 2, 2014
I meant refused. According to some that lived there, the improvements would be too costly for them. Whether that be true or not, I don't know. I do know that for the longest time, they had well water. Long into the 1980's I believe but not sure.
Midlo History

Chicago, IL

#12 Feb 2, 2014
Growing up over there, as a kid a lot of the Parents and other kids a lot of times could and would have a very snobbish attitude towards people from the "outside of their circle" as they put it. Old man Heinimen from the bakery lived there and would give a caddy a "doozen: donuts or a dollar. A few Factory owners, car dealership owners, one that had a dealership and sold drugs on the side back in the 60's, later moved to Calif. go figure. Just to name a few. Kids at the pool acted like the brats on Caddyshack and a few kids were like Yeah, that's my Parents not me.
anonymous

Chicago, IL

#13 Feb 3, 2014
I found it quite curious when the Club admitted in its own history book that the members didn't want anyone even knowing the Club existed for the first few years.

Your other insights are not surprising as well, especially since the club apparently not only had no conflict with Al Capone living amongst it's members, but that through the railroad they had on their property, they were able to secure prison labor as their workforce.

Why pay someone an honest fair wage for hard work when you can lord over someone for next to nothing and act proud of it?
Midlo History Buff

Orland Park, IL

#14 Feb 3, 2014
To the original poster -- the name 'Midlothian' didn't exist in the area until the Midlothian Country Club was formed in 1898, using the name of the area of Scotland where golf originated. The 'Midlothian and Blue Island Railroad,' built in 1901, was originally planned by Country Club owners to connect the Country Club with Blue Island, thereby connecting with streetcar and rail transportation to Chicago, where all the wealthy country club founders were living.(Roads were mud ruts in our area much of the time)- The original route wasn't feasible, so it ended up being run to 147th. The resulting train station at the interchange of the Rock Island and the M&BI RR was called 'Midlothian'- as indicated by the big sign on the front of the station and the notation in the Rock Island Railroad directory of 1910. A woman from the Posen area, Mrs. Schippell, was the Midlothian station agent, who was followed in that position in 1912 by R.K. Cumming, the first resident stationmaster and first postmaster. So, with the name 'Midlothian' firmly ingrained in the area, it was not surprising that the Woerheide family operated the Midlothian Pickle Farm and in 1921 the Midlothian Methodist Church began, some time before the Midlothian Development Association formed to plan to incorporate as a town. The need for a town coincided with the real need for a fire department, police department, and other basic services for a growing population. It was probably a 'no-brainer' to call the town Midlothian, instead of, say, West Posen, North Tinley, or Pickle Junction. I'm not sure when the Midlothian Creek got its name. And there never have been more than a handful of citizens of Scottish origin in town - always diverse, mainly Polish, German, Italian, Irish, others - right from the start.
So the town was probably named for the generally accepted name of the area, which got its name from the railroad station, which was called that because of its interchange with the M&BI Railroad, which was named after the local Country Club which was named after the area of Scotland.
Who gets credit for 'founding" Midlothian? Don't know. There were a lot of people who contributed to the early days of the town's proud history.

By the way,'Midlo History" is somebody else, not me.
Really

Midlothian, IL

#15 Feb 4, 2014
So basically Midlothian got its name from a sign left up on the train station that the country club left.
Midlo History

Lansing, IL

#16 Feb 4, 2014
Midlo History Buff wrote:
To the original poster -- the name 'Midlothian' didn't exist in the area until the Midlothian Country Club was formed in 1898, using the name of the area of Scotland where golf originated. The 'Midlothian and Blue Island Railroad,' built in 1901, was originally planned by Country Club owners to connect the Country Club with Blue Island, thereby connecting with streetcar and rail transportation to Chicago, where all the wealthy country club founders were living.(Roads were mud ruts in our area much of the time)- The original route wasn't feasible, so it ended up being run to 147th. The resulting train station at the interchange of the Rock Island and the M&BI RR was called 'Midlothian'- as indicated by the big sign on the front of the station and the notation in the Rock Island Railroad directory of 1910. A woman from the Posen area, Mrs. Schippell, was the Midlothian station agent, who was followed in that position in 1912 by R.K. Cumming, the first resident stationmaster and first postmaster. So, with the name 'Midlothian' firmly ingrained in the area, it was not surprising that the Woerheide family operated the Midlothian Pickle Farm and in 1921 the Midlothian Methodist Church began, some time before the Midlothian Development Association formed to plan to incorporate as a town. The need for a town coincided with the real need for a fire department, police department, and other basic services for a growing population. It was probably a 'no-brainer' to call the town Midlothian, instead of, say, West Posen, North Tinley, or Pickle Junction. I'm not sure when the Midlothian Creek got its name. And there never have been more than a handful of citizens of Scottish origin in town - always diverse, mainly Polish, German, Italian, Irish, others - right from the start.
So the town was probably named for the generally accepted name of the area, which got its name from the railroad station, which was called that because of its interchange with the M&BI Railroad, which was named after the local Country Club which was named after the area of Scotland.
Who gets credit for 'founding" Midlothian? Don't know. There were a lot of people who contributed to the early days of the town's proud history.
By the way,'Midlo History" is somebody else, not me.
I would never try and dishonor you Sir.
Midlo History Buff

Orland Park, IL

#17 Feb 4, 2014
Not dishonored at all. I'm pleased to be in the company of others interested in history, as you obviously are. My last comment was only made for clarification.
Midlo History Buff

Orland Park, IL

#18 Feb 4, 2014
Really wrote:
So basically Midlothian got its name from a sign left up on the train station that the country club left.
Guess you were right after all...
Still no closer to naming the founder of the village, unless we can find the guy who hung up the sign.:)
anonymous

Chicago, IL

#19 Feb 4, 2014
Wow! Picked up a few tidbits I didn't know about including a woman being the first station master (seems like quite a few of my sources skipped over that part!) as well as what farm Woerhide was operating. Learned the name from reading the 75th Anniversary book for St. Christopher and that they had rented their first space in the old Woerhide building that apparently used to be home to some of the workers on the Midlothian Pickle Farm.

Wouldn't Pickle, Illinois have been an interesting name for the village?:)

Also, I do agree there were but a few of Scottish descent in the area, but apparently Arthur Macintosh was Scottish and his obituary (along with other sources) state that he was the developer of Inverness Illinois, which he named after family property in Scotland.

Lastly, I can't help but wonder why there is no evidence of what the lime quarry was called prior to its purchase by Shedd. A 1900 plat map shows the previous owner to be a William Schwartz and that particular quarry most likely supplied the lime used to build Benjamin Coolers house on 14th and Cicero (which burned down in 1971, I think) along with the first school house to be built in Robbins. I have trouble imagining them hauling the stones any farther than needed and the Boehme (?) Quarry in Batcheldor's/Bachelor's Grove didn't have the benefit of the railroad or open roads (dirt as they were at the time).
Midlo History

Lansing, IL

#20 Feb 5, 2014
Reading these posts and thinking, I never realized about how long the Woerhide family has been here. I used to go to School with a few. very nice family from the Country Club. The Limestone also I didn't realize until thinking about the old one room School that used to be on 147th just west of Lonf ave and how many Quarries are or were actually in the area. Through the years, they must have filled them in?

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