JAWA water project
Squandering Continues

Maywood, IL

#490 May 30, 2014
Tainted wrote:
<quoted text>
Who would regulate JAWA?  Indiana? Illinois? Both? Who will ultimately over see the Jawa Board? Who is over seeing the runaway Jawa board now? Who will monitor the water quality; if a water source is ever actually secured? Indiana? Illinois?
Without any of the required intergovernmental agreements; Jawa will never be able to obtain a single drop of water.
Thank You Watchdogs

Blue Island, IL

#491 Jun 1, 2014
Watchdogs don’t just bite, they save money

Illinois Auditor General Bill Holland is paid about $150,000 a year.

In a report he released Thursday, Holland concludes that the state has paid $12 million in health care for more than 8,000 dead people.

In the last few months, since Holland’s findings first became known internally among top officials, the state has recouped about $7 million of that money. And, the officials say, they expect to recoup $11 million by the end of the year.

All of which means that Bill Holland has more than earned his pay.

We feel the need to point this out because so many politicians seem to be allergic to auditors general, inspectors general and similar in-house clean government snoops. When, for example, City of Chicago Inspector General Joe Ferguson walks into a room, aldermen have been known to break out in hives, slam shut their laptop computers, and fall thrashing to the floor. Not for nothing has the City Council refused to give Ferguson oversight over the Council’s work and, instead, set up its own largely toothless IG office that has proven to be a mistake.

What have they got to hide?

As Holland’s audit of the Illinois Department of Health and Family Services shows, he’s not a big-game headhunter, just an auditor. He’s not playing gotcha, just trying to save the state money — our money. And Health and Family Services has set about fixing the problem. As a spokesperson for the department noted, nobody deliberately put all those dead people on the state’s managed care rolls; it was a glitch in an automated process.

Holland has shown, once again, why in-house but independent inspectors are essential to good and clean government.

And we can’t imagine why anybody would feel threatened, certainly not the Chicago City Council, where a mere 31 aldermen have been convicted of corruption since 1973.
Peter

Blue Island, IL

#492 Jun 1, 2014
Thank You Watchdogs wrote:
Watchdogs don’t just bite, they save money
Illinois Auditor General Bill Holland is paid about $150,000 a year.
In a report he released Thursday, Holland concludes that the state has paid $12 million in health care for more than 8,000 dead people.
In the last few months, since Holland’s findings first became known internally among top officials, the state has recouped about $7 million of that money. And, the officials say, they expect to recoup $11 million by the end of the year.
All of which means that Bill Holland has more than earned his pay.
We feel the need to point this out because so many politicians seem to be allergic to auditors general, inspectors general and similar in-house clean government snoops. When, for example, City of Chicago Inspector General Joe Ferguson walks into a room, aldermen have been known to break out in hives, slam shut their laptop computers, and fall thrashing to the floor. Not for nothing has the City Council refused to give Ferguson oversight over the Council’s work and, instead, set up its own largely toothless IG office that has proven to be a mistake.
What have they got to hide?
As Holland’s audit of the Illinois Department of Health and Family Services shows, he’s not a big-game headhunter, just an auditor. He’s not playing gotcha, just trying to save the state money — our money. And Health and Family Services has set about fixing the problem. As a spokesperson for the department noted, nobody deliberately put all those dead people on the state’s managed care rolls; it was a glitch in an automated process.
Holland has shown, once again, why in-house but independent inspectors are essential to good and clean government.
And we can’t imagine why anybody would feel threatened, certainly not the Chicago City Council, where a mere 31 aldermen have been convicted of corruption since 1973.
Blue Island definitely needs a watch dog. But who would do it?
Watching and Researching

Maywood, IL

#493 Jun 1, 2014
Not the folks currently in office. Harvey is broke and owes Chicago 18 million dollars for past due water bills according to their comptroller. Calumet Park is out. Robbins has been a No Show for more than six months. Midlothian is cash strapped along with Markham, and Blue Island. Alsip is the only community that has any money. The Jawa has already been sued for beach of contract. Still no viable information. What's next?
Dantep

Chesapeake, OH

#494 Jun 3, 2014
The jawa scam is a slick operation. Let's wait and see who goes to jail. The operators think everything is hunky dory. They think they got away with this con. Only time will tell.
It is Never OK

Maywood, IL

#495 Jun 4, 2014
Dantep wrote:
The jawa scam is a slick operation. Let's wait and see who goes to jail. The operators think everything is hunky dory. They think they got away with this con. Only time will tell.
http://www.avoidthescam.net/
Returned

Maywood, IL

#496 Jun 5, 2014
Dantep wrote:
The jawa scam is a slick operation. Let's wait and see who goes to jail. The operators think everything is hunky dory. They think they got away with this con. Only time will tell.
Have the conflict of interest campaign donations been returned?
Get the Facts

Maywood, IL

#497 Jun 5, 2014
Dantep wrote:
The jawa scam is a slick operation. Let's wait and see who goes to jail. The operators think everything is hunky dory. They think they got away with this con. Only time will tell.
AVOID THE SCAM
Illinois Secretary of State Securities Department

Facts About Con Artists

Con Artists Blend In
Con artists often blend in with a community organization, religious group, ethnic association, or other affinity group in order to win the investor's trust and appear legitimate. These scammers form a bond with members and rely on them to spread the word about the investment opportunity. They are very friendly and stay in constant contact when soliciting money, but are hard to reach when they owe a payment.

Con Artists Talk a Good Game and Make Promises
Scam artists often claim that their investment opportunity has no risks and is guaranteed to make money. They are smooth talkers, but rarely have financial statements or documentation about their company and investment venture. Do not believe promises of high returns and do not rely on fancy Web sites or testimonials of quick riches. Demand offering documents and check with the Secretary of State's Securities Department to make sure the promoter is licensed and not barred from selling investments.

Con Artists Want a Quick Response
Con artists use pressure sales tactics to convince investors to quickly sign on and part with their money. Scammers may claim there are deadlines for investing or that the market will change and the opportunity to make money will slip away. Do not be pressured into investing. Take time to review the investment documents and to check the promoter's licensing status and history.

Tips to Avoid Scams
Contact the Secretary of State's Securities Department to make sure the person offering or selling the investment is licensed with the department.
Do not rush to invest. Take time to investigate the promoter and investment opportunity. Speak with a trusted financial professional who can review the documents with you. If there are no investment documents, do not invest.
Do not invest with cash or send payments to post office boxes.
If you do not receive a promised return, report this promptly to the Securities Department. Be wary of excuses and explanations of why a payment was not made as promised. The Securities Department is a state government agency and does not charge investors for assistance.
Shake Up

Maywood, IL

#498 Jun 7, 2014
Watching and Researching wrote:
Not the folks currently in office. Harvey is broke and owes Chicago 18 million dollars for past due water bills according to their comptroller. Calumet Park is out. Robbins has been a No Show for more than six months. Midlothian is cash strapped along with Markham, and Blue Island. Alsip is the only community that has any money. The Jawa has already been sued for breach of contract. Still no viable information. What's next?
Harvey remains at the forefront of a current ongoing FBI Investigation. SSJAWA, municipal representatives, elected officials, and those relationships all deserve FBI attention.
Impact

Maywood, IL

#499 Jun 7, 2014
Mayors, Village Board Presidents, Board Members, and Aldermen need to be provided with all of the current information. ASAP!
Read

Maywood, IL

#500 Jun 7, 2014
Impact wrote:
Mayors, Village Board Presidents, Board Members, and Aldermen need to be provided with all of the current information. ASAP!
http://ssjawa.illinois.gov/
What is Really Going On

Maywood, IL

#501 Jun 8, 2014
Watching and Researching wrote:
Not the folks currently in office. Harvey is broke and owes Chicago 18 million dollars for past due water bills according to their comptroller. Calumet Park is out. Robbins has been a No Show for more than six months. Midlothian is cash strapped along with Markham, and Blue Island. Alsip is the only community that has any money. The Jawa has already been sued for beach of contract. Still no viable information. What's next?
How are Mayors, Village Board Presidents, Board Members, and Aldermen provided with any or all of the current information? The new website is flashy and seems to reflect Robbins is out and Calumet Park is in. Why?

http://ssjawa.illinois.gov/
Withdraw

Maywood, IL

#502 Jun 11, 2014
Calumet Park exits group seeking to get water via Hammond
  
BY SUSAN DEMAR LAFFERTY
Updated: June 11, 2014 2:11AM
    
As a group of Southland towns says it is closing in on a deal to get Lake Michigan water from Hammond instead of Chicago, one of its members has withdrawn.
Members of the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency recently voted 6 to 1 to allow Calumet Park to withdraw, six months after it submitted its request.
Fed up with Chicago’s rising water rates, the group formed in 2012 and borrowed $5.5 million to find out what it would cost to create their own pipeline system and obtain Lake Michigan water from Hammond. But that feasibility study has been turned over to a new firm, a lawsuit has been filed and now Calumet Park is out.
“I have concerns about the group being able to get the job done financially,” said Calumet Park Mayor Ronald Denson, who had served as the agency’s vice chairman.“I have financial concerns with some of the partners.”
The mayor said he is concerned that if one community defaulted, the other partners would have to figure out how to pay for it.
“I am unhappy with Chicago’s rates, but at least I know what it will cost me,” Denson said. With the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency, he said he is “not sure what it will cost or if it will happen.
“They said it would take one year to get the costs, and after two years, we still do not know the cost,” Denson said.“I’m not sure how long I can wait on JAWA.”
He said his village board unanimously agreed to withdraw from this project.
The loss of Calumet Park will not affect the viability of the project, because it was the smallest water user in the agency, according to the group’s attorney, Michael Stillman. Calumet Park’s share represented less than 3.78 percent of the cost, while Harvey is the largest water customer, with 39 percent.
Other partners are Alsip, Blue Island, Markham, Midlothian and Robbins.
According to a Sun-Times article in September, Harvey, which has been beset with financial challenges, owed the city of Chicago $15.3 million in unpaid water bills.
Denson said his town will pay its share of the $5.5 million bond issue that was used to bankroll the feasibility study. That share totals $210,000.
Calumet Park’s withdrawal is just one in a series of snags in the past two years.
“There have been a lot of challenges,” Stillman said.
Agency members now are realizing that the initial $5.5 million may not be enough to finish the feasibility study. But Stillman said it may be possible to refinance the existing bonds and get enough money to finish the study.
The agency’s board also terminated its contract with Postl-Yore and Associates, the firm doing the feasibility study, which has resulted in a lawsuit. Robinson Engineering has been hired to complete the task, Stillman said.
He admits this has been a “painfully slow” process but said they are close to signing an agreement with Hammond and will schedule two public forums to review the plan in the near future.
“People think we are dragging our feet. They do not realize how hard this is,” Stillman said.
Knock Knock

Maywood, IL

#503 Jun 11, 2014
Withdraw wrote:
Calumet Park exits group seeking to get water via Hammond
  
BY SUSAN DEMAR LAFFERTY
Updated: June 11, 2014 2:11AM
    
As a group of Southland towns says it is closing in on a deal to get Lake Michigan water from Hammond instead of Chicago, one of its members has withdrawn.
Members of the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency recently voted 6 to 1 to allow Calumet Park to withdraw, six months after it submitted its request.
Fed up with Chicago’s rising water rates, the group formed in 2012 and borrowed $5.5 million to find out what it would cost to create their own pipeline system and obtain Lake Michigan water from Hammond. But that feasibility study has been turned over to a new firm, a lawsuit has been filed and now Calumet Park is out.
“I have concerns about the group being able to get the job done financially,” said Calumet Park Mayor Ronald Denson, who had served as the agency’s vice chairman.“I have financial concerns with some of the partners.”
The mayor said he is concerned that if one community defaulted, the other partners would have to figure out how to pay for it.
“I am unhappy with Chicago’s rates, but at least I know what it will cost me,” Denson said. With the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency, he said he is “not sure what it will cost or if it will happen.
“They said it would take one year to get the costs, and after two years, we still do not know the cost,” Denson said.“I’m not sure how long I can wait on JAWA.”
He said his village board unanimously agreed to withdraw from this project.
The loss of Calumet Park will not affect the viability of the project, because it was the smallest water user in the agency, according to the group’s attorney, Michael Stillman. Calumet Park’s share represented less than 3.78 percent of the cost, while Harvey is the largest water customer, with 39 percent.
Other partners are Alsip, Blue Island, Markham, Midlothian and Robbins.
According to a Sun-Times article in September, Harvey, which has been beset with financial challenges, owed the city of Chicago $15.3 million in unpaid water bills.
Denson said his town will pay its share of the $5.5 million bond issue that was used to bankroll the feasibility study. That share totals $210,000.
Calumet Park’s withdrawal is just one in a series of snags in the past two years.
“There have been a lot of challenges,” Stillman said.
Agency members now are realizing that the initial $5.5 million may not be enough to finish the feasibility study. But Stillman said it may be possible to refinance the existing bonds and get enough money to finish the study.
The agency’s board also terminated its contract with Postl-Yore and Associates, the firm doing the feasibility study, which has resulted in a lawsuit. Robinson Engineering has been hired to complete the task, Stillman said.
He admits this has been a “painfully slow” process but said they are close to signing an agreement with Hammond and will schedule two public forums to review the plan in the near future.
“People think we are dragging our feet. They do not realize how hard this is,” Stillman said.
What costs $5.5 Million plus interest?
Another Scam

Blue Island, IL

#504 Jun 12, 2014
Withdraw wrote:
Calumet Park exits group seeking to get water via Hammond
  
BY SUSAN DEMAR LAFFERTY
Updated: June 11, 2014 2:11AM
    
As a group of Southland towns says it is closing in on a deal to get Lake Michigan water from Hammond instead of Chicago, one of its members has withdrawn.
Members of the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency recently voted 6 to 1 to allow Calumet Park to withdraw, six months after it submitted its request.
Fed up with Chicago’s rising water rates, the group formed in 2012 and borrowed $5.5 million to find out what it would cost to create their own pipeline system and obtain Lake Michigan water from Hammond. But that feasibility study has been turned over to a new firm, a lawsuit has been filed and now Calumet Park is out.
“I have concerns about the group being able to get the job done financially,” said Calumet Park Mayor Ronald Denson, who had served as the agency’s vice chairman.“I have financial concerns with some of the partners.”
The mayor said he is concerned that if one community defaulted, the other partners would have to figure out how to pay for it.
“I am unhappy with Chicago’s rates, but at least I know what it will cost me,” Denson said. With the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency, he said he is “not sure what it will cost or if it will happen.
“They said it would take one year to get the costs, and after two years, we still do not know the cost,” Denson said.“I’m not sure how long I can wait on JAWA.”
He said his village board unanimously agreed to withdraw from this project.
The loss of Calumet Park will not affect the viability of the project, because it was the smallest water user in the agency, according to the group’s attorney, Michael Stillman. Calumet Park’s share represented less than 3.78 percent of the cost, while Harvey is the largest water customer, with 39 percent.
Other partners are Alsip, Blue Island, Markham, Midlothian and Robbins.
According to a Sun-Times article in September, Harvey, which has been beset with financial challenges, owed the city of Chicago $15.3 million in unpaid water bills.
Denson said his town will pay its share of the $5.5 million bond issue that was used to bankroll the feasibility study. That share totals $210,000.
Calumet Park’s withdrawal is just one in a series of snags in the past two years.
“There have been a lot of challenges,” Stillman said.
Agency members now are realizing that the initial $5.5 million may not be enough to finish the feasibility study. But Stillman said it may be possible to refinance the existing bonds and get enough money to finish the study.
The agency’s board also terminated its contract with Postl-Yore and Associates, the firm doing the feasibility study, which has resulted in a lawsuit. Robinson Engineering has been hired to complete the task, Stillman said.
He admits this has been a “painfully slow” process but said they are close to signing an agreement with Hammond and will schedule two public forums to review the plan in the near future.
“People think we are dragging our feet. They do not realize how hard this is,” Stillman said.
Another Peloquin Scam the taxpayers must pay for. How can we make money for our friends? Where is the FBI?
Drowning in Add Ons

Maywood, IL

#505 Jun 12, 2014
Denial wrote:
http://southtownstar.suntimes. com/news/13552142-418/water-bi lls-reaching-high-tide-in-some -southland-areas.html
Due diligence required by all elected officials!
DILIGENCE is PAST DUE!
Vigilance

Blue Island, IL

#506 Jun 13, 2014
Vigilance
Cancellation

Maywood, IL

#507 Jun 13, 2014
Withdraw wrote:
Calumet Park exits group seeking to get water via Hammond
  
BY SUSAN DEMAR LAFFERTY
Updated: June 11, 2014 2:11AM
    
As a group of Southland towns says it is closing in on a deal to get Lake Michigan water from Hammond instead of Chicago, one of its members has withdrawn.
Members of the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency recently voted 6 to 1 to allow Calumet Park to withdraw, six months after it submitted its request.
Fed up with Chicago’s rising water rates, the group formed in 2012 and borrowed $5.5 million to find out what it would cost to create their own pipeline system and obtain Lake Michigan water from Hammond. But that feasibility study has been turned over to a new firm, a lawsuit has been filed and now Calumet Park is out.
“I have concerns about the group being able to get the job done financially,” said Calumet Park Mayor Ronald Denson, who had served as the agency’s vice chairman.“I have financial concerns with some of the partners.”
The mayor said he is concerned that if one community defaulted, the other partners would have to figure out how to pay for it.
“I am unhappy with Chicago’s rates, but at least I know what it will cost me,” Denson said. With the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency, he said he is “not sure what it will cost or if it will happen.
“They said it would take one year to get the costs, and after two years, we still do not know the cost,” Denson said.“I’m not sure how long I can wait on JAWA.”
He said his village board unanimously agreed to withdraw from this project.
The loss of Calumet Park will not affect the viability of the project, because it was the smallest water user in the agency, according to the group’s attorney, Michael Stillman. Calumet Park’s share represented less than 3.78 percent of the cost, while Harvey is the largest water customer, with 39 percent.
Other partners are Alsip, Blue Island, Markham, Midlothian and Robbins.
According to a Sun-Times article in September, Harvey, which has been beset with financial challenges, owed the city of Chicago $15.3 million in unpaid water bills.
Denson said his town will pay its share of the $5.5 million bond issue that was used to bankroll the feasibility study. That share totals $210,000.
Calumet Park’s withdrawal is just one in a series of snags in the past two years.
“There have been a lot of challenges,” Stillman said.
Agency members now are realizing that the initial $5.5 million may not be enough to finish the feasibility study. But Stillman said it may be possible to refinance the existing bonds and get enough money to finish the study.
The agency’s board also terminated its contract with Postl-Yore and Associates, the firm doing the feasibility study, which has resulted in a lawsuit. Robinson Engineering has been hired to complete the task, Stillman said.
He admits this has been a “painfully slow” process but said they are close to signing an agreement with Hammond and will schedule two public forums to review the plan in the near future.
“People think we are dragging our feet. They do not realize how hard this is,” Stillman said.
The JAWA meeting for Thursday, June 12, 2014 was cancelled.
What You Need to Know

Maywood, IL

#508 Jun 13, 2014
Knock Knock wrote:
<quoted text>
What costs $5.5 Million plus interest?
Pay very close attention to the direction the JAWA goes in. The JAWA has the unique potential of bankrupting several municipalities simultaneously.

A plan by seven SOUTHLAND communities by getting Lake Michigan water through Whiting, Ind., has fallen apart.

Midlothian, Harvey, Robbins, Markham, Blue Island, Calumet Park and Alsip formed the South Suburban Joint Action Water Agency, which issued $5.6 million in bonds to begin the project.

No bid contracts for the feasibility studies, engineering and legal work were distributed.

Each of the seven charter members of the water agency must pay a certain percentage toward the costs.

Harvey’s share is 38 percent, followed by Alsip (30 percent), Blue Island (11 percent), Robbins (7 percent), Midlothian (6 percent), Markham (5 percent) and Calumet Park (4 percent).

Thus far the JAWA has determined water can not come from Whiting, In.; due to contamination of Lake Michigan water from regular BP refinery discharges. Most of the money has been spent, the feasibility study has not been completed, intergovernmental agreements, and a water source have not been secured.
Wake Up

Blue Island, IL

#509 Jun 13, 2014
Where is Peloquin?

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