Mike Madigan Ready To Insult Your Int...
Well Documented

Maywood, IL

#82 Oct 27, 2013
Pay offs, pay outs, contracts, and jobs are well documented in Chicago dating back to Prohibition and have simply been allowed to continue. Millions and millions of dollars changed hands.

Look at many of the employees in state, county, municipal, and township positions. Who are they? What credentials do they possess?

Statewide and more locally the practice further includes "pet projects" like JAWA and the LIMESTONE QUARRY. The projects do not have the potential to enhance quality of life, period.
Gain

Maywood, IL

#83 Oct 27, 2013
Well Documented wrote:
Pay offs, pay outs, contracts, and jobs are well documented in Chicago dating back to Prohibition and have simply been allowed to continue. Millions and millions of dollars changed hands.
Look at many of the employees in state, county, municipal, and township positions. Who are they? What credentials do they possess?
Statewide and more locally the practice further includes "pet projects" like JAWA and the LIMESTONE QUARRY. The projects do not have the potential to enhance quality of life, period.
Millions and Billions of dollars have changed hands.
Why? Because there is a secondary gain.
what a joke

Blue Island, IL

#84 Nov 8, 2013
Playing us for chumps on pension reform and mandatory minimum sentences
Editorials November 6, 2013
Wasn’t this supposed to be the big week for pension reform in Springfield?
What a joke.
As the glow that lit the Capitol Tuesday after the passage of gay marriage started to fade, it became abundantly clear there would be no action on cutting state public employee pension costs this week, the end of the fall session.
No action on the state’s $100 billion unfunded pension liability — the amount it owes for four retirement systems but has no money to pay.
The House on Wednesday voted to cut benefits for Chicago Park District employees after that agency reached a deal, a promising development. But nothing on state pensions.
There may be a special session at the end of November, we hear. Or maybe early December. And if it’s early December, might as well push it off until lawmakers return in January, the growing conventional wisdom says.
We have felt like chumps before. We’re feeling like chumps again.
All summer and early fall we kept hearing that a 10-member legislative pension committee was on its way toward a fair and workable resolution. We dared to believe that was true. But committee members, and the four legislative leaders brought in last month for a final push, can’t get a deal done.
A new plan by Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno is the cause of the latest delay. Her plan is being analyzed by actuaries to see how much it saves, which will take two to three weeks.
It’s a return to an idea floated in earlier, failed efforts: reducing retiree cost-of-living increases, as nearly every plan has proposed, but doing it so high earners take a bigger hit while lower wage, long-term employees are protected.
It’s an idea we embrace and are happy to see it back in play.
But this latest delay had better amount to something.(How often have we said that?) It cannot be a reason for yet another pension reform effort to implode.
Radogno tells us she is optimistic that real progress has been made. And she’s right. The pension committee created a viable framework for a deal, and the differences that separate lawmakers — both in savings and in policy — are now relatively small.
That means a solution is in reach today.
Lawmakers moved mountains to bring gay marriage to Illinois. They can do the same to save the state and its retirement systems from financial ruin.
Say no to mandatory
sentences for gun crimes
Having punted again on pension reform, however, the Legislature is getting around to another hot-button issue: an effort to boost mandatory minimum sentences for felons and gang members caught illegally in possession of guns. A vote on that bill is scheduled for Thursday in the House.
Fortunately, a House committee on Wednesday stripped out the worst part of the bill, which would have increased mandatory sentences for first-time offenders, even those with perfectly clean records.
But it remains a bad bill, one that comes at a time when the rest of the nation is abandoning mandatory minimums because they haven’t delivered on their promise of reducing crime.
In an editorial last week, the Los Angeles Times even warned Illinois — calling out to our state by name — that California has been down that road and got nothing for it but crowded prisons and a “shocking diversion of public resources.”
The Illinois Department of Corrections asked this week for an extra $28 million to cover costs for the prisoners it already manages. The agency estimates that the mandatory minimum law, if passed, would require hundreds of millions of dollars more over 10 years.
The idea behind mandatory minimums is to keep potential gun criminals off the streets. But piling on new penalties without examining what really works is a mistake.
State Sen. Kwame Raoul said it just about right Wednesday, so we’ll give him the final word:
what a joke

Blue Island, IL

#85 Nov 8, 2013
“It’s ill-advised to do reactionary law-making, and we’ve been doing it as long as I’ve been in the Legislature and longer. There’s a string of [criminal] occurrences and we say we need to enhance penalities on this crime or some other one. We do that instead of using data to scale up or scale back punishments. Instead, we do it based on gut and a press conference. We need to look at recidivism, deterrence, punishment, all that thing you’re supposed to consider.”
Term Limits the remedy

Blue Island, IL

#86 Nov 10, 2013
Miller: Petulant Madigan getting thrown off his game
By Rich Miller
The rich irony of House Speaker Michael Madigan denouncing somebody else for attempting to be a “kingmaker” is so obvious and laughable that I can’t help but wonder why a guy who’s been a take-no-prisoners kingmaker for so long would ever think of saying such a thing.
You may already know the story. The Better Government Association and the Chicago Sun-Times took a look at some of those passing around Madigan’s campaign petitions to see if they had government jobs.
What they found wasn’t surprising — 17 of 30 people who passed Madigan’s nominating petitions had public jobs. Another 12 had at one time worked for the government.
Power tends to feed off itself. The longer you’re around, the more power you tend to have, and the more power you have, the more you can get. And Madigan (D-Chicago) has been around Illinois and Chicago politics forever. He’s at the top of the heap as far as state government power goes and is also chairman of the state Democratic Party.
Ideologically, Madigan, 71, has moved with the times. He favors both medical marijuana and gay marriage, for example.
Politically, the man is anything but post-modern. He’s Chicago’s 13th Ward Democratic committeeman and runs his ward like it’s been run for a century or more. Running an old-time organization, however, requires old-style patronage, and Madigan is a master at finding jobs for his precinct workers.
A good case in point is Patrick Ward, a Madigan precinct worker. Ward was drawing a public pension while working at Metra, but he wanted a raise and hadn’t received one, so he asked his sponsor for help. Madigan made a couple of calls, then backed off when Metra’s chief executive, Alex Clifford, objected to political interference.
Clifford eventually resigned in a secret deal that included a huge severance package and a vow of silence. But when the media got wind of the cost of the severance (as much as $817,000), all hell broke loose and all fingers pointed to Madigan.
The Sun-Times and the BGA’s investigative team took a look at Madigan’s most recent nominating petitions, noticed Ward was a circulator and then took a look at the other names. The BGA sent people door to door to talk to the other circulators to see if they were the same folks who showed up on the government-employee searches. Some of those precinct workers alleged that they and their families were harassed, and Madigan got angry.
Term Limits the remedy

Blue Island, IL

#87 Nov 10, 2013
He unleashed a diatribe against the BGA and its leader, Andy Shaw, for being on “an unrelenting journey to become a kingmaker in Illinois politics.” He also blasted the BGA for allegedly trying to undermine the Democratic Party.

Madigan is fiercely protective of his 13th Ward loyalists, who are almost like family to him. A statement simply denouncing the BGA’s tactics would’ve been reasonable, although still ironic considering how personally aggressive and “unrelenting” Madigan’s House campaigns can be.

And some of the BGA’s political motivations and top contributors are also fair game. The group preaches political cleanliness but doesn’t always associate with the cleanest of the clean.

But all Madigan did with that “kingmaker” comment was turn Shaw into a folk hero and help him raise lots more money. You’d think Madigan would comprehend the public consequences of such an over-the-top claim.

Word going around is that Madigan may be trying to head off another ongoing BGA inquiry. But all he may have done was whet the group’s appetite.

The speaker has really been off his game the past several months. He literally ran away and hid from Chicago TV reporter Chuck Goudie a few months ago, which resulted in a humiliating story on the Chicago’s most-watched news station.

He publicly tossed his daughter under the bus after she blamed his resistance to retirement for her decision not to run for governor.

And Madigan insulted Senate President John Cullerton (D-Chicago) last May by telling a Sun-Times reporter that Cullerton displayed a “lack of leadership” on pension reform.

Partly due to his daughter’s aborted gubernatorial bid and partly due to the Metra patronage mess, polling has shown that the public’s awareness of Madigan has grown this year. And the public definitely doesn’t like the guy. So, he’s only hurting himself and his party members with stunts like this BGA attack.

Madigan is valued at the Statehouse for being the most grown up of the grownups. But he’s simply not acting that way of late.

Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax, a daily political newsletter, and CapitolFax.com .
Wealth

Maywood, IL

#88 Nov 10, 2013
Economist Caution: Prepare For 'Massive Wealth Destruction'

Take immediate steps to protect your wealth ... NOW!

That’s exactly what many well-respected economists, billionaires, and noted authors are telling you to do — experts such as Marc Faber, Peter Schiff, Donald Trump, and Robert Wiedemer. According to them, we are on the verge of another recession, and this one will be far worse than what we experienced during the last financial crisis.

Marc Faber, the noted Swiss economist and investor, has voiced his concerns for the U.S. economy numerous times during recent media appearances, stating,“I think somewhere down the line we will have a massive wealth destruction. I would say that well-to-do people may lose up to 50 percent of their total wealth.”

When he was asked what sort of odds he put on a global recession happening, the economist famous for his ominous predictions quickly answered ...“100 percent.”

Faber points out that this bleak outlook stems directly from Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke’s policy decisions, and the continuous printing of new money, referred to as “quantitative easing” in the media.

Faber’s pessimism is matched by well-respected economist and investor Peter Schiff, the CEO of Euro Pacific Capital. Schiff remarks that the stock market collapse we experienced in 2008 “wasn’t the real crash. The real crash is coming.”

Schiff didn’t stop there. Most alarming is his belief that daily life will get dramatically worse for U.S. citizens.

“If we keep doing this policy of stimulus and growing government, it’s just going to get worse for the average American. Our standard of living is going to fall ... People who are expecting Social Security can’t get all that money. People expecting government pensions can’t get all their money ... We simply can’t afford to pay them.”

Equally critical of the current government and our nation’s economy is real estate mogul and entrepreneur Donald Trump, who is warning that the United States could soon become a large-scale Spain or Greece, teetering on the edge of financial ruin.

Trump doesn’t hesitate to point out America’s unhealthy dependence on China.“When you’re not rich, you have to go out and borrow money. We’re borrowing from the Chinese and others.”

It is this massive debt that worries Trump the most.

“We are going up to $16 trillion [in debt] very soon, and it’s going to be a lot higher than that before he gets finished,” Trump says, referring to President Barack Obama.“When you have [debt] in the $21-$22 trillion [range], you are talking about a [credit] downgrade no matter how you cut it.”

In a recent appearance, Trump went to so far as to say the dollar is “going to hell.”

Where Trump, Faber, and Schiff see rising debt, a falling dollar, and a plunging stock market, investment adviser and author Robert Wiedemer sees much more widespread economic destruction.

In a recent interview to talk about his New York Times best-seller Aftershock, Wiedemer says,“The data is clear, 50 percent unemployment, a 90 percent stock market drop, and 100 percent annual inflation… starting in 2013.”
Now

Maywood, IL

#89 Nov 10, 2013
Economist Caution: Prepare For 'Massive Wealth Destruction'

Take immediate steps to protect your wealth ... NOW!

That’s exactly what many well-respected economists, billionaires, and noted authors are telling you to do — experts such as Marc Faber, Peter Schiff, Donald Trump, and Robert Wiedemer. According to them, we are on the verge of another recession, and this one will be far worse than what we experienced during the last financial crisis.

Marc Faber, the noted Swiss economist and investor, has voiced his concerns for the U.S. economy numerous times during recent media appearances, stating,“I think somewhere down the line we will have a massive wealth destruction. I would say that well-to-do people may lose up to 50 percent of their total wealth.”

When he was asked what sort of odds he put on a global recession happening, the economist famous for his ominous predictions quickly answered ...“100 percent.”

Faber points out that this bleak outlook stems directly from Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke’s policy decisions, and the continuous printing of new money, referred to as “quantitative easing” in the media.

Faber’s pessimism is matched by well-respected economist and investor Peter Schiff, the CEO of Euro Pacific Capital. Schiff remarks that the stock market collapse we experienced in 2008 “wasn’t the real crash. The real crash is coming.”

Schiff didn’t stop there. Most alarming is his belief that daily life will get dramatically worse for U.S. citizens.

“If we keep doing this policy of stimulus and growing government, it’s just going to get worse for the average American. Our standard of living is going to fall ... People who are expecting Social Security can’t get all that money. People expecting government pensions can’t get all their money ... We simply can’t afford to pay them.”

Equally critical of the current government and our nation’s economy is real estate mogul and entrepreneur Donald Trump, who is warning that the United States could soon become a large-scale Spain or Greece, teetering on the edge of financial ruin.

Trump doesn’t hesitate to point out America’s unhealthy dependence on China.“When you’re not rich, you have to go out and borrow money. We’re borrowing from the Chinese and others.”

It is this massive debt that worries Trump the most.

“We are going up to $16 trillion [in debt] very soon, and it’s going to be a lot higher than that before he gets finished,” Trump says, referring to President Barack Obama.“When you have [debt] in the $21-$22 trillion [range], you are talking about a [credit] downgrade no matter how you cut it.”

In a recent appearance, Trump went to so far as to say the dollar is “going to hell.”

Where Trump, Faber, and Schiff see rising debt, a falling dollar, and a plunging stock market, investment adviser and author Robert Wiedemer sees much more widespread economic destruction.

In a recent interview to talk about his New York Times best-seller Aftershock, Wiedemer says,“The data is clear, 50 percent unemployment, a 90 percent stock market drop, and 100 percent annual inflation… starting in 2013.”
Something Smells

Oak Lawn, IL

#90 Nov 10, 2013
I hear the Madigan name and it makes me check the bottom of my shoes to see what sh!t I stepped in.
The Business Corruption

Blue Island, IL

#91 Dec 23, 2013
Editorial: Politicians' income, assets too easy to hide

December 23, 2013

State and local elected officials in Illinois are required to disclose their outside sources of income each year, but they can get away with revealing very little. The Statement of Economic Interests form has just eight broadly worded questions.

As a result the most influential political leaders, such as House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton, who are both lawyers, can reveal less about their income and client relationships than a Chicago building inspector or a police captain. Midlevel city employees must reveal outside sources of income for themselves, their spouses or domestic partners, earned capital gains, real estate investments, gifts of more than $250 from nonfamily members, and financial relationships with anyone who applied to the city for a license, permit or zoning change. They must reveal if they owe, or are owed, more than $5,000 to, or from, a person or entity that does business with the city, and relationships with lobbyists and contractors doing work for the city.

State law requires far less truth-telling.

A bill in Springfield to tighten disclosure rules passed the Senate this year but suffered swift asphyxiation in the House — assignment to the Rules Committee, which Madigan controls and where bills go to die.

The bill, pushed by Cook County Clerk David Orr and Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, would require elected officials to disclose outside sources of income, lobbyist relationships and private loans. It tightens up the questions on the form, making it harder for politicians to dance around. It doesn't go as far as Chicago's reporting requirement, but it's far better than what's required now.

Federal law requires more disclosure from members of Congress, who must list stock and investment interests. Members of Congress aren't allowed to hold outside jobs, but Illinois legislators can, and many do. Get elected to office, and suddenly everyone wants to throw business at you. It's very easy, particularly if you're a lawyer or a consultant, to take personal advantage of political influence. More reason for more disclosure.

A 2012 analysis from Orr's office found that 87 percent of the 22,000 Cook County employees and elected officials required to file the disclosure paperwork answered "not applicable" to every single question on the form. The questions are vague by design.

The forms are a waste of time. They allow elected officials to keep their business interests private, a courtesy the public should not tolerate. Public officials, by the very nature of their work and the influence they carry, should not be allowed to hide their outside business dealings.

A 2012 Medill Watchdog review found 14 elected officials from Cook County alone were related to or in business with lobbyists. But those relationships can be kept secret under the current system. It's another area where Illinois lags behind other states.

The Better Government Association and Fox 32 News recently reported on a questionable real estate deal involving Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown. A campaign donor gave a parcel of commercial property in Chicago to Brown's husband. The property was transferred to a business they own, and then sold for $100,000. Brown didn't have to reveal the transaction on her economic interests statement, and she has avoided answering questions about the deal.

How many times do such sweet deals happen in this state, across many levels of government? Who knows?

Disclosure statements, as they stand now, are a joke. Speaker Madigan, let this bill out of Rules and bring it to a vote. This kind of sunlight is really needed.
Corruption

Maywood, IL

#92 Dec 23, 2013
Corruption is in business and "IS BIG BUSINESS!"
Something Smells

Oak Lawn, IL

#93 Dec 23, 2013
The Business Corruption wrote:
Editorial: Politicians' income, assets too easy to hide
December 23, 2013
State and local elected officials in Illinois are required to disclose their outside sources of income each year, but they can get away with revealing very little. The Statement of Economic Interests form has just eight broadly worded questions.
As a result the most influential political leaders, such as House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton, who are both lawyers, can reveal less about their income and client relationships than a Chicago building inspector or a police captain. Midlevel city employees must reveal outside sources of income for themselves, their spouses or domestic partners, earned capital gains, real estate investments, gifts of more than $250 from nonfamily members, and financial relationships with anyone who applied to the city for a license, permit or zoning change. They must reveal if they owe, or are owed, more than $5,000 to, or from, a person or entity that does business with the city, and relationships with lobbyists and contractors doing work for the city.
State law requires far less truth-telling.
A bill in Springfield to tighten disclosure rules passed the Senate this year but suffered swift asphyxiation in the House — assignment to the Rules Committee, which Madigan controls and where bills go to die.
The bill, pushed by Cook County Clerk David Orr and Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, would require elected officials to disclose outside sources of income, lobbyist relationships and private loans. It tightens up the questions on the form, making it harder for politicians to dance around. It doesn't go as far as Chicago's reporting requirement, but it's far better than what's required now.
Federal law requires more disclosure from members of Congress, who must list stock and investment interests. Members of Congress aren't allowed to hold outside jobs, but Illinois legislators can, and many do. Get elected to office, and suddenly everyone wants to throw business at you. It's very easy, particularly if you're a lawyer or a consultant, to take personal advantage of political influence. More reason for more disclosure.
A 2012 analysis from Orr's office found that 87 percent of the 22,000 Cook County employees and elected officials required to file the disclosure paperwork answered "not applicable" to every single question on the form. The questions are vague by design.
The forms are a waste of time. They allow elected officials to keep their business interests private, a courtesy the public should not tolerate. Public officials, by the very nature of their work and the influence they carry, should not be allowed to hide their outside business dealings.
A 2012 Medill Watchdog review found 14 elected officials from Cook County alone were related to or in business with lobbyists. But those relationships can be kept secret under the current system. It's another area where Illinois lags behind other states.
The Better Government Association and Fox 32 News recently reported on a questionable real estate deal involving Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown. A campaign donor gave a parcel of commercial property in Chicago to Brown's husband. The property was transferred to a business they own, and then sold for $100,000. Brown didn't have to reveal the transaction on her economic interests statement, and she has avoided answering questions about the deal.
How many times do such sweet deals happen in this state, across many levels of government? Who knows?
Disclosure statements, as they stand now, are a joke. Speaker Madigan, let this bill out of Rules and bring it to a vote. This kind of sunlight is really needed.
I hear the Madigan/Rita name and it makes me check the bottom of my shoes to see what sh!t I stepped in.
Something Smells

Oak Lawn, IL

#94 Dec 23, 2013
The Business Corruption wrote:
Editorial: Politicians' income, assets too easy to hide
December 23, 2013
State and local elected officials in Illinois are required to disclose their outside sources of income each year, but they can get away with revealing very little. The Statement of Economic Interests form has just eight broadly worded questions.
As a result the most influential political leaders, such as House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton, who are both lawyers, can reveal less about their income and client relationships than a Chicago building inspector or a police captain. Midlevel city employees must reveal outside sources of income for themselves, their spouses or domestic partners, earned capital gains, real estate investments, gifts of more than $250 from nonfamily members, and financial relationships with anyone who applied to the city for a license, permit or zoning change. They must reveal if they owe, or are owed, more than $5,000 to, or from, a person or entity that does business with the city, and relationships with lobbyists and contractors doing work for the city.
State law requires far less truth-telling.
A bill in Springfield to tighten disclosure rules passed the Senate this year but suffered swift asphyxiation in the House — assignment to the Rules Committee, which Madigan controls and where bills go to die.
The bill, pushed by Cook County Clerk David Orr and Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, would require elected officials to disclose outside sources of income, lobbyist relationships and private loans. It tightens up the questions on the form, making it harder for politicians to dance around. It doesn't go as far as Chicago's reporting requirement, but it's far better than what's required now.
Federal law requires more disclosure from members of Congress, who must list stock and investment interests. Members of Congress aren't allowed to hold outside jobs, but Illinois legislators can, and many do. Get elected to office, and suddenly everyone wants to throw business at you. It's very easy, particularly if you're a lawyer or a consultant, to take personal advantage of political influence. More reason for more disclosure.
A 2012 analysis from Orr's office found that 87 percent of the 22,000 Cook County employees and elected officials required to file the disclosure paperwork answered "not applicable" to every single question on the form. The questions are vague by design.
The forms are a waste of time. They allow elected officials to keep their business interests private, a courtesy the public should not tolerate. Public officials, by the very nature of their work and the influence they carry, should not be allowed to hide their outside business dealings.
A 2012 Medill Watchdog review found 14 elected officials from Cook County alone were related to or in business with lobbyists. But those relationships can be kept secret under the current system. It's another area where Illinois lags behind other states.
The Better Government Association and Fox 32 News recently reported on a questionable real estate deal involving Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown. A campaign donor gave a parcel of commercial property in Chicago to Brown's husband. The property was transferred to a business they own, and then sold for $100,000. Brown didn't have to reveal the transaction on her economic interests statement, and she has avoided answering questions about the deal.
How many times do such sweet deals happen in this state, across many levels of government? Who knows?
Disclosure statements, as they stand now, are a joke. Speaker Madigan, let this bill out of Rules and bring it to a vote. This kind of sunlight is really needed.
I hear the Madigan/Rita name and it makes me check the bottom of my shoes to see what sh!t I stepped in!
Smells like Chit

Oak Lawn, IL

#95 Dec 23, 2013
The Business Corruption wrote:
Editorial: Politicians' income, assets too easy to hide
December 23, 2013
State and local elected officials in Illinois are required to disclose their outside sources of income each year, but they can get away with revealing very little. The Statement of Economic Interests form has just eight broadly worded questions.
As a result the most influential political leaders, such as House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton, who are both lawyers, can reveal less about their income and client relationships than a Chicago building inspector or a police captain. Midlevel city employees must reveal outside sources of income for themselves, their spouses or domestic partners, earned capital gains, real estate investments, gifts of more than $250 from nonfamily members, and financial relationships with anyone who applied to the city for a license, permit or zoning change. They must reveal if they owe, or are owed, more than $5,000 to, or from, a person or entity that does business with the city, and relationships with lobbyists and contractors doing work for the city.
State law requires far less truth-telling.
A bill in Springfield to tighten disclosure rules passed the Senate this year but suffered swift asphyxiation in the House — assignment to the Rules Committee, which Madigan controls and where bills go to die.
The bill, pushed by Cook County Clerk David Orr and Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, would require elected officials to disclose outside sources of income, lobbyist relationships and private loans. It tightens up the questions on the form, making it harder for politicians to dance around. It doesn't go as far as Chicago's reporting requirement, but it's far better than what's required now.
Federal law requires more disclosure from members of Congress, who must list stock and investment interests. Members of Congress aren't allowed to hold outside jobs, but Illinois legislators can, and many do. Get elected to office, and suddenly everyone wants to throw business at you. It's very easy, particularly if you're a lawyer or a consultant, to take personal advantage of political influence. More reason for more disclosure.
A 2012 analysis from Orr's office found that 87 percent of the 22,000 Cook County employees and elected officials required to file the disclosure paperwork answered "not applicable" to every single question on the form. The questions are vague by design.
The forms are a waste of time. They allow elected officials to keep their business interests private, a courtesy the public should not tolerate. Public officials, by the very nature of their work and the influence they carry, should not be allowed to hide their outside business dealings.
A 2012 Medill Watchdog review found 14 elected officials from Cook County alone were related to or in business with lobbyists. But those relationships can be kept secret under the current system. It's another area where Illinois lags behind other states.
The Better Government Association and Fox 32 News recently reported on a questionable real estate deal involving Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown. A campaign donor gave a parcel of commercial property in Chicago to Brown's husband. The property was transferred to a business they own, and then sold for $100,000. Brown didn't have to reveal the transaction on her economic interests statement, and she has avoided answering questions about the deal.
How many times do such sweet deals happen in this state, across many levels of government? Who knows?
Disclosure statements, as they stand now, are a joke. Speaker Madigan, let this bill out of Rules and bring it to a vote. This kind of sunlight is really needed.
I hear the Madigan/Rita name and it makes me check the bottom of my shoes to see what sh!t I stepped in
Agreed

Maywood, IL

#96 Dec 23, 2013
Corruption wrote:
Corruption is in business and "IS BIG BUSINESS!"
It IS all about GREED AND POWER.
Make Your Vote Count

Blue Island, IL

#97 Dec 29, 2013
A Remap Referendum: It's time to tell party bosses,'Enough'

By The Daily Herald Editorial Board
The voters in the area around Buffalo Grove always seemed to think Sidney Mathias was a likable guy and a responsive legislator. So every two years, they elected him by fairly comfortable margins to the Illinois House.

Mathias had a built-in advantage in those races. He once had been village president of Buffalo Grove, and most of the community provided the core of the old square-shaped 53rd House District he represented.

Then last year, Mathias got trounced.

Had there been a scandal? Had the voters tired of him? Had he suddenly become unlikable and unresponsive?

None of the above.

When legislative districts were redrawn after the 2010 census, Buffalo Grove was cut in half and Mathias, a Republican, was nudged into a jagged new district that zigged up to the Diamond Lake area of Mundelein and then zagged in a narrow band all the way up the tollway into North Chicago and to the edge of Waukegan. That geography provided welcome turf for an incumbent Democrat, Carol Sente of Vernon Hills, and she used it to full advantage.

You might say ol' Sid never knew what hit him, except he knew it full well: Michael Madigan.

Our point here isn't to defend or lionize Mathias. For these purposes, he's simply an example, and there are many, many others.

But the reality is, Mathias wasn't turned out by the voters. The reality is, under the legislative map-drawing process that Illinois now follows, the voters have very little say. The machine politicians like Madigan have taken it out of the voters' hands.

Republicans knew the day after the 2010 election put Democrats firmly in charge of the remapping process in Illinois that they were going to take it on the chin in the 2012 elections.

And Mathias knew the day the new map was released that his time as a legislator was over.

This wasn't a map that would make Mathias' re-election chances tough. It was a map that made them impossible.

We said in the first part of this editorial series that Illinois' corrupt remapping process — a process that effectively gives those in power the ability to draw the maps in a way that will sustain them in power — is a "not-so-silent killer of democracy" in Illinois.

It is exactly that.

In so many of these contorted districts, the only real function voters are fulfilling by going to the polls is to perpetuate the fantasy that our democracy actually functions.

As we said in another editorial on our corrupt remapping process in September, "this naked to-the-victor-go-the-spoils tradition is one of our republic's darkest and most cynical rituals, and in turn, a major reason why, to our licentious politicians' great favor, the citizenry becomes almost hopelessly anesthetized by the public cynicism it begets."

Enough. Enough.

Enough!

Don't be anesthetized. Do something about it. Grab the power back from the machine politicians.

Say Yes for Independent Maps. Work to get a constitutional amendment on next November's ballot.
A Good Thing

Blue Island, IL

#98 Jan 1, 2014
A Remap Referendum: How you can help

An effort to amend the Illinois Constitution is under way.

It is one thing to declare, as we have in previous installments of this editorial series, that Illinois' system for establishing legislative boundaries is a travesty that serves to entrench political power brokers and impede meaningful change. It is a more important thing to identify whether the state has an alternative.

It does.

It begins with an effort under way to amend the Illinois Constitution. That effort, led by a coalition of reform groups operating as Yes for Independent Maps, seeks to place a referendum on the November ballot to create a more transparent and fair redistricting process in the state. We urge you now to support that referendum and no doubt we will repeat the appeal many times between now and November.

But you don't have to wait to get involved.

Perhaps the best place to begin is with the organization's website, independentmaps.org . There, you'll find not only answers to questions about the constitutional amendment and a complete description of the process it would put in place, but also options for getting personally involved. Those may be as simple as finding out where you can sign a petition to get the issue on the ballot or as advanced as contributing money or actually distributing petitions. In order for the issue to appear on the November ballot, Yes for Independent Maps must collect nearly 300,000 signatures by April, so both time and support are critical.

Why is this particular option worth your attention and effort? Several reasons.

The proposed change is an outgrowth of recommendations made by a task force put in place by Gov. Pat Quinn in 2009 and subsequently ignored by the political establishment, and it builds on them with research of the experiences in Iowa, California, New Jersey and other states that have created new redistricting mechanisms that aim for fair representation of all — emphasis on all — interests of their populations.

The Yes for Independent Maps proposal would have maps drawn by an 11-member commission made up primarily of citizens who apply to participate. Two would be registered Democrats, two Republicans, three unaffiliated with any party and four appointed — one each — by the top legislative leaders. Selection of the seven non-appointed commissioners would be made by lottery from a pool of 100 most-qualified applicants as determined by a nonpartisan applicant review panel.

Once in place, the commission would be required to create legislative districts that are contiguous and substantially equal in population, do not diminish the ability of any racial or language minority to elect candidates of its choice, respect town and local-government boundaries, accommodate social and economic interests of neighboring communities and do not intentionally favor or disregard any political party or group.

All meetings and records of the commission would be open to the public, and draft maps would be debated in public hearings throughout the state before adoption of a final map, which would require not only seven votes from the 11-member commission but also that those seven votes include at least two Democrats, two Republicans and two unaffiliated members.

The Illinois redistricting amendment clearly has been written to emphasize fairness and inclusion. With this system in place, politicians no longer will be able to foist upon the electorate boundary maps created behind closed doors and unveiled at the eleventh hour to protect some political interests and diminish others.

For too long, Illinois politicians in both parties have taken advantage of a redistricting system that is easily manipulated to create confusing boundaries that defy the interests of democracy in order to fortify and promote entrenched factions. For too long, we've all complained. Now, there is something we can do about it.

Let's get it done.
Have a problem call mike

Blue Island, IL

#99 Jan 6, 2014
How Madigan builds his patronage army
No government job too small for House speaker to exert his considerable influence

By David Kidwell, John Chase and Alex Richards
Tribune reporters
6:29 a.m. CST, January 5, 2014

When House Speaker Michael Madigan accidentally triggered a patronage scandal at the Metra commuter rail agency, it was the result of two extraordinary events.

First his request to boost the Metra salary of a longtime political worker was refused. Then it became public.

The ensuing uproar has cost taxpayers a fortune, prompted a shake-up at Metra and spawned ongoing investigations into political favoritism, insider dealing and a lack of transparency. Yet none of those inquiries is likely to illuminate the extent of Madigan's far-reaching patronage operation or his efforts to sustain his legion of loyalists.

A Tribune investigation sought to do just that, documenting employees at every level of state and local government who work elections for Madigan, donate regularly to his campaign funds, register voters for him or circulate candidate petitions on his behalf.

By that conservative measure, the newspaper found more than 400 current or retired government employees with strong political ties to Madigan. It also found repeated instances where Madigan took personal action to get them jobs, promotions or raises, just as he did for the Metra employee.

Madigan declined to be interviewed or answer questions about his practices. Instead, he issued a statement through spokesman Steve Brown:

"The individuals who assist in community projects and campaigns have a strong interest in politics and government, just like the supporters and volunteers of any other public official. They share my belief in fairness for working middle-class families, strong and safe neighborhoods, and civic responsibility."
wow

Blue Island, IL

#100 Jan 6, 2014
Madigan intervenes on behalf of connected pals with OUR money. This guy is the living embodiment of public sleaze and corruption. And it is galling in the extreme that the clueless and stupid residents of this state are so indifferent to this kind of corruption. It happens because we let it happen. This man belongs locked up in a cage. Daley, Madigan, Cullerton, ALL OF THEM. Crooks who have run this state's finances into a hole that will take many decades of high taxes to fix - and that's assuming any of them ever make an honest attempt to fix it. The only think a sensible person could even hope to do is just to move to a different state.
Not With His Own Funds

Maywood, IL

#101 Jan 6, 2014
By that conservative measure, the newspaper found more than 400 current or retired government employees with strong political ties to Madigan. It also found repeated instances where Madigan took personal action to get them jobs, promotions or raises, just as he did for the Metra employee.

All of these jobs are paid for by the "taxpayers" not Mike's own money......

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Dixmoor Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Public Hearing on the water rate increase 1 hr Natural Consequences 18
Village Hall Painted 2 hr 35 Year Resident 25
Stop the Soda Tax in Cook County Mon Wheres Eddie Been... 72
Commander Sisk New Chief Sun Glug Glug 22
John Kasparek New City Auditor Addresses City C... (Oct '15) Sun Issues 65
She Gone Sep 17 Question 2
Liquor store cruise night Sep 17 Larry 3

Dixmoor Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Dixmoor Mortgages