Does the Gazette Suck or What?
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Jobs Ohio

Delaware, OH

#22 Mar 20, 2013
I would like to see a story in the Gazette on where Sn Jordan and Rep Brenner stand on the Jobs Ohio audit.
Carrie

Marion, OH

#23 Mar 20, 2013
Jobs Ohio wrote:
I would like to see a story in the Gazette on where Sn Jordan and Rep Brenner stand on the Jobs Ohio audit
I agree. They seem to get columns whenever they want to speak. THe Gazette should act like a news outlet and get statements from them.
Same sex marriage

Delaware, OH

#24 Mar 21, 2013
We would like to see a story in the Gazette on where Sn Jordan and Rep Brenner stand on the Jobs Ohio audit. Especially since US Sn Portman changed his position.
Education K-12 funding

Delaware, OH

#25 Mar 23, 2013
How about a story where Representative Brenner and Senator Jordan stand on funding education for our children?

This is from the Columbus Dispatch:
The state of Ohio has financially squeezed public education beyond its breaking point, and cracks are starting to show in the state's most fragile areas — Appalachian and rural school districts. The proposed budget, as it stands now, constricts support for public education where it's needed most and will do so into the future.School districts that don't make the financial cut are getting left behind, along with their students and their potential. This doesn't just hurt those schools; it hurts teachers, children, families and communities across Ohio. Public education promises every child, from Cleveland's suburbs to Appalachia's foothills, an equal education and opportunity to succeed.When we withdraw support for public education from our poorest districts, we're closing doors for the children who live there. Under the proposed state budget 60 percent to 80 percent of school districts in Appalachian Ohio will receive no additional funding.Elsewhere in the state, some wealthy school districts could see up to a 300 percent increase in funding, while, for example, Appalachian Athens County will see none.I have had the honor or working with some of the most devoted and talented teachers in the state. Rural and Appalachian teachers in public education have to be, with resources shrinking and state demands growing. They're doing more with less every day. Rather than recognizing their extraordinary efforts, the proposed state budget, as it stands now, further obstructs these teachers' abilities to do their best work.Public-school teachers in Appalachia already are struggling to instruct students and meet increasing state demands on the ever-dwindling budgets they have. We need to relieve the pressure put on Ohio's neediest school districts.We need to come together as a state for public education. We can't wait until it is convenient. When the recession threatened Ohio, Appalachian public schools and their teachers tightened their belts along with the rest of the state. But now that lean times are passing, the squeeze on education has remained.On March 12, I joined members of Ohio University's Patton College of Education, the Coalition for Rural and Appalachian Schools, 75 Ohio superintendents, 25 treasurers and many others to defend the needs of Appalachian and rural students, teachers and schools to the state's Education Finance Subcommittee.This was not a one-time show of enthusiasm for this important issue. This was just the beginning of a mission to ensure that every child educated in Ohio obtains the same quality of education, regardless of their region or their locality's finances. Public education is a universal path to bettering oneself and one's community.An equitable public-education system is central to who we are as Americans. The Coalition for Rural and Appalachian Schools, the Patton College of Education and I believe that passionately. We will continue to advocate for Ohio's forgotten counties, just as we did on March 12. We will continue to speak out for a truly public and equal education for all, because it's the right thing to do and because Ohio's children deserve better than to be forgotten.

RENEE MIDDLETON
DeanDean, School of Education
Ohio UniversityAthens
Good reporting

Delaware, OH

#26 Apr 8, 2013
Three Kasich ideas failing to gain support
DUSTIN ENSINGER

Staff Writer

Three key pieces of Gov. John Kasich’s bud­get pro­posal appear to lack the nec­es­sary sup­port to make it through the Ohio Legislature.

The pro­posed broad­en­ing of the sales tax base, the expan­sion of Medicare and a new school fund­ing plan all appear to be in jeop­ardy, the three state leg­is­la­tors rep­re­sent­ing Delaware County said Fri­day dur­ing a County Com­mis­sion­ers Asso­ci­a­tion of Ohio leg­isla­tive briefing.

“We don’t under­stand where the gov­er­nor is com­ing from on some of his ideas,” said Rep. Mar­garet Ann Ruhl (R-Mount Ver­non).“He’s not explained it to us.”

The sales tax pro­posal would lower the state rate by 0.5 per­cent and county sales tax rates by vary­ing amounts, while expand­ing the base by tax­ing dozens of pre­vi­ously exempted ser­vices. Delaware County would see its rate fall from 1.25 per­cent to 0.80 percent.

“It’s not going to be in the bud­get. Where it goes from here, I’m not real sure,” Ruhl said.“At first it sounded like a good idea, and then as I dug into it more and more, it isn’t feasible.”

Kasich had planned to use the addi­tional rev­enue to off­set the cost of low­ered income tax rates. While the sales tax idea may be dead in the water, Rep. Andrew Bren­ner (R-Powell) said there is still inter­est in low­er­ing the income tax rate.

Bren­ner also said Kasich’s school fund­ing pro­posal is likely to be tweaked. He wants to see fund­ing fol­low stu­dents so that dis­tricts with declin­ing enroll­ment receive less fund­ing while dis­tricts with increas­ing enroll­ment see more money from the state.

There is also sup­port for chang­ing the way in which the base fund­ing for­mula is cal­cu­lated. That could result in a decrease in the num­ber of dis­tricts with guar­an­teed fund­ing, Bren­ner said.

The loss of guar­an­teed fund­ing could ruf­fle the feath­ers of school offi­cials in dis­tricts across the state and Delaware County. Buck­eye Val­ley and Big Wal­nut both rely on guar­an­teed funding.

Kasich also pro­posed expand­ing Med­ic­aid as part of the Afford­able Health Care act, more com­monly known as Oba­macare. Bren­ner, Ruhl and Sen. Kris Jor­dan (R-Ostrander) said that pro­posal is dead in the water, at least among GOP legislators.

“I will not sup­port Med­ic­aid expan­sion under any terms,” Jor­dan said, adding he does not believe Democ­rats will be able to peel away enough Repub­li­can votes to get that mea­sure through both cham­bers of the legislature.

Delaware County Com­mis­sioner Den­nis Sta­ple­ton was pleased with much of what he heard, espe­cially about the demise of the sales tax proposal.

“I cer­tainly wasn’t for the reduc­tion of our sales tax,” he said.“I really thought that had some holes in it.”

Sta­ple­ton is also con­cerned about the cost of Med­ic­aid expan­sion for the county, which could require addi­tional caseworkers.

“I think that would be some addi­tional costs and we don’t know that those costs would be off­set by fed­eral dol­lars,” he said.

While he can’t sup­port some of the key pil­lars of the governor’s bud­get, Jor­dan said he admires the bold approach taken.

“I’ll give the gov­er­nor credit,” he said.“He didn’t just sit around and wait for things to hap­pen. While I dis­agree with some of the major pro­pos­als I appre­ci­ate his efforts to do what he thinks Oho need to move in a bet­ter direction.”
Tina

Delaware, OH

#27 Apr 8, 2013
Thanks SaraMarie. It's good to see your hubby preaching fiscal responsibility when he allowed the company he ran to rob the federal government (and all of us honest tax payers). Classy Baby!
Good reporting again

Delaware, OH

#28 Apr 10, 2013
Jordan hopes to repeal alternative energy rule
DUSTIN ENSINGER

Staff Writer

A 2008 law requir­ing elec­tric dis­tri­b­u­tion util­i­ties and elec­tric ser­vices com­pa­nies to pro­vide more energy to con­sumers though advanced and renew­able energy sources could be repealed if Sen. Kris Jor­dan (R-Ostrander) has his way.

Jor­dan has intro­duced leg­is­la­tion to repeal the law forc­ing elec­tric com­pa­nies to pro­vide one-quarter of their retail power sup­plies from alter­na­tive sources by 2025.

“I’m not opposed to solar and wind,” he said.“I just don’t think gov­ern­ment needs to man­date and sub­si­dize their exis­tence. If they can com­pete based on price, then I think con­sumers will pick it.”

The bill was passed dur­ing a time of ris­ing energy costs and con­sump­tion, and the assump­tion at the time was prices and usage would con­tinue to rise. That assump­tion, how­ever, has proven to be wrong, mak­ing the man­dates unnec­es­sary, Jor­dan said.

The leg­is­la­tion passed with just one dis­sent­ing vote.

“There were a lot of things that peo­ple didn’t know a cou­ple of years ago,” Jor­dan said, adding the price of renew­able energy has not proven to be as cheap as orig­i­nally though and the shale boom in east­ern Ohio has changed the energy land­scape in the state.

Jor­dan believes those fac­tors have led many in the leg­is­la­ture to feel as through the require­ments are now bur­den­some and unnec­es­sary. He said his ideas will be passed through the leg­is­la­ture, either through his own leg­is­la­tion or a sim­i­lar bill.

“I believe that my ideas will be become law,” he said.

Brian Kaiser, direc­tor of Green Jobs and Inno­va­tion at the Ohio Envi­ron­men­tal Coun­cil, is not so sure.

“I don’t think Sen. Jordan’s bill has merit,” he said.“I don’t think that’s the kind of solution-oriented, fact-based pol­icy that Ohioans expect.”

Were the alter­na­tive energy require­ments to be repealed, Kaiser pre­dicts the Ohio econ­omy would suffer.

“I’m con­cerned that law­mak­ers in Ohio would con­sider and even put on the draw­ing board the pos­si­bil­ity of mess­ing with some­thing that is work­ing so well,” he said.“Just the idea of open­ing this thing up has a pro­found chill­ing effect on busi­ness in the state.”

Eric Zim­mer, CEO of Tip­ping Point Renew­able Energy, said the require­ments allow the alter­na­tive energy indus­try to flour­ish, lead­ing to inno­va­tion that con­tin­u­ally dri­ves down the cost of wind and solar energy.

“It gives those new tech­nolo­gies time to incu­bate and com­pete with exist­ing tech­nol­ogy,” he said.

Zim­mer sees a future in which clean energy tech­nolo­gies com­pete on an even play­ing field with fos­sil fuel-based tech­nol­ogy, and he is afraid Ohio will not be at the fore­front of that energy rev­o­lu­tion if the require­ments are repealed.

“I think it’s a big step back­wards for Ohio,” he said.“It takes us out of a poten­tial lead­er­ship position.”

The leg­is­la­tion has been assigned to the Senate’s Pub­lic Util­i­ties Committee.
Still want answers

Delaware, OH

#29 Apr 10, 2013
We, the voters, still deserve answers as to where our Representaives (Jordan, Brenner and Ruhl) stand on education funding.
Sara

Delaware, OH

#30 Apr 10, 2013
Still want answers wrote:
We, the voters, still deserve answers as to where our Representaives (Jordan, Brenner and Ruhl) stand on education funding.
It would be nice to know why Sara Marie and Andy Brenner are thieves. They stole money from the public, and they have never repaid it.

It would be nice to know why Kris Jordan threatens and intimidates his wife.

They are terrible people.
DelGaz SucksItHard

Anonymous Proxy

#31 Apr 11, 2013
The recent stories fawning over Brenner and Jordan are simply puff pieces for the jackwads from Delaware County in public offices.

Jordan wants to regress back to the 1800's and eliminate alternative and renewable energy requirements in Ohio law. The dickhead-reporter at the Delaware Gazette failed to mention that this same law requires this renewable energy to be produced in Ohio with Ohio workers. So Jordan wants to KILL OHIO JOBS.

The story about the Ohio budget and Brenner's comments should be qualified with a statement that Brenner as the VP of Prestige Music Company in Powellalong with his wife refused to pay nearly two years of federal taxes that they withheld from employees of the F-rated Prestige Music. The IRS calls that stealing from the employees. The Brenners failed to pay nearly $70,000 in withholding taxes during Brenners reelection campaign.

Don't forget Antonoplos who still has federal tax liens for more than $300,000 from 2004. Our state Auditor Yost snagged an Ohio tax lien when he was Delaware County's auditor.

Yeah, the Gazette is a suckwad rag with cretins for reporters whose only function inllife is to politically-hanjob Delaware Republicans. The tradition continues.
Carrie

Marion, OH

#32 Apr 11, 2013
DelGaz SucksItHard wrote:
The recent stories fawning over Brenner and Jordan are simply puff pieces for the jackwads from Delaware County in public offices.
Jordan wants to regress back to the 1800's and eliminate alternative and renewable energy requirements in Ohio law. The dickhead-reporter at the Delaware Gazette failed to mention that this same law requires this renewable energy to be produced in Ohio with Ohio workers. So Jordan wants to KILL OHIO JOBS.
The story about the Ohio budget and Brenner's comments should be qualified with a statement that Brenner as the VP of Prestige Music Company in Powellalong with his wife refused to pay nearly two years of federal taxes that they withheld from employees of the F-rated Prestige Music. The IRS calls that stealing from the employees. The Brenners failed to pay nearly $70,000 in withholding taxes during Brenners reelection campaign.
Don't forget Antonoplos who still has federal tax liens for more than $300,000 from 2004. Our state Auditor Yost snagged an Ohio tax lien when he was Delaware County's auditor.
Yeah, the Gazette is a suckwad rag with cretins for reporters whose only function inllife is to politically-hanjob Delaware Republicans. The tradition continues.
I have not been impressed with our local response to education. We continue to devalue teachers. We continue to devalue an educated populace. In effect, we continue to devalue our society as a whole. Public education is important to ensure that all people are able to receive a baseline education.

There are problems with the system, and there are people who under perform or do not perform. The solution proposed by people like Representative Andrew Brenner is to dissolve the entire institution. That does not solve any problems; it only creates more problems. Let correct our course, not obliterate it.
Duh Huh

Delaware, OH

#33 Oct 8, 2013
Look, The Delaware Gazette DOES suck but realize that they walk a thin line between reporting and being owned by advertisers. The paper will not report any news story that will directly affect the advertising revenue stream. This is not a traditional newspaper but a rag driven by the need to stay alive.

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