Most important school supplies? The parents

A parent of one of Linda Zornes' first-grade students stunned the teacher when she gave her $100 and one directive: Spend the money on her classroom. Full Story
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sealionindy

United States

#1 Aug 12, 2007
Volunteers have always been very important to all school systems. It's the parental involvement with their own children that needs attention.
Thats the key.

Since: Mar 07

Ft Mitchell, KY

#2 Aug 12, 2007
When I went to grade school in the 50's all of the stuff that we needed in class was furnished and paid for from taxes collected . When and why did that concept disappear ? Teachers didn't have to pay for it out of their wages , nor was it donated ....
Ronnie

Fishers, IN

#4 Aug 12, 2007
chad wrote:
People worry too much about children and try to control too much of what happens.
Crack down on the disruptive ones, make them wear uniforms and quit talking about them.
The past 20yrs we have done them a diservice by the liberal "new way to teach" now we have a whole generation of fat, lazy, and stupid adults. They are waiting on the Government to tell them their next move.
I have to go now and drink a cold one.
Schools haven't gone "Liberal." Schools haven't changed since the last 20 years- the American family has and its attitude towards free education has. Let the schools do it by themselves.
Josie

Fishers, IN

#5 Aug 12, 2007
Lafayette wrote:
When I went to grade school in the 50's all of the stuff that we needed in class was furnished and paid for from taxes collected . When and why did that concept disappear ? Teachers didn't have to pay for it out of their wages , nor was it donated ....
As things like gas, health care and heating oil rise, they rise for the schools as well. People just assume that they can educate a kid for the same thing that they did 25 years ago. Costs rise. Schools are demonized for the spending but I when you district has 80 year old buildings without air conditioning I hardly call that over spending. Most prisons in this state have newer facilities. Maybe that shows where our priorities have been all of these years in this state.
Ronald

Pleasant Prairie, WI

#6 Aug 12, 2007
It's not the parental involvement that makes the eductaion better. Its the fact that the kids of those willing to get involved are better kids. Education starts at home. You can bet that the parent who cared enough to volunteer or send supplies also cares enough to check backpacks, help with homework and make sure their kids are prepared to learn.
Ronald

Pleasant Prairie, WI

#7 Aug 12, 2007
We started the great society 40 years ago. Each year we expand the program and offer more government programs, each year our kids and their attitudes slip a little more.

Now it's these kids have no future hope so Evan Bayh passed 21 century scholars promising college education yet it's still not enough and we are slipping further. The more programs we have the worse it gets.

Self reliance is the answer.
amazed

Claypool, IN

#8 Aug 12, 2007
chad wrote:
People worry too much about children and try to control too much of what happens.
Crack down on the disruptive ones, make them wear uniforms and quit talking about them.
The past 20yrs we have done them a diservice by the liberal "new way to teach" now we have a whole generation of fat, lazy, and stupid adults. They are waiting on the Government to tell them their next move.
I have to go now and drink a cold one.


How can you worry too much about our children? I bet you shop at Walmart when it is 95 degrees outside and leave your kids in the car.
Humphf

AOL

#9 Aug 12, 2007
Hope this gave the money without letting the teacher know her identity. I've known of other parents who have tried to buy their students grades
Humphf

AOL

#10 Aug 12, 2007
amazed wrote:
<quoted text>
How can you worry too much about our children? I bet you shop at Walmart when it is 95 degrees outside and leave your kids in the car.
So, you look down on people who shop at Wal-Mart?
Stumblebum

Kankakee, IL

#11 Aug 12, 2007
Sure, after the school systems spend thousands of dollars per pupil, what's missing is -- the parents volunteering to do, excuse me, help with, the teaching, and forking over some spot cash. The parents might as well forget the teacher hand-holding and go right to homeschooling. Let then keep their property taxes and spend them of the educations their choosing.

How charming it is that "educators will always let parents know what needs to be done." You can see in student test scores that "educators" know exactly what needs doing, but never don't get around to it. Another clue about what teachers know might be knowing is the disproportionate percentage of public school "educators" who send their kids to private schools. "Flee, children, flee!"

So-called parent teacher organizations are mere auxiliaries of teacher unions.

Put all the elements of the modern American public school together: colleges of education which teach nothing of substance, vast administrative bureaucracy, limited choice, teachers who hand off to assistants, and voracious teachers unions. Put then together and you get the worst educated students in the developed, and much of the less developed, world. This hybrid at least has the blessing of costing more than the rest.

Any parent (or other taxpayer) genuinely interested in the anatomy of public school must start by reading the expert: Richard Mitchell, the "underground grammarian." Read and weep.

http://www.sourcetext.com/grammarian/

--------
American public education is a remarkable enterprise; it succeeds best where it fails. Imagine an industry that consistently fails to do what it sets out to do, a factory where this year's product is invariably sleazier than last year's but, nevertheless, better than next year's. Imagine a corporation whose executives are always spending vast sums of money on studies designed to discover just what it is they are supposed to do and then vaster sums for further studies on just how to do it. Imagine a plant devoted to the manufacture of factory seconds to be sold at a loss. Imagine a producer of vacuum cleaners that rarely work hiring whole platoons of engineers who will, in time, report that it is, in fact, true that the vacuum cleaners rarely work, and who will, for a larger fee, be glad to find out why, if that's possible. If you discover some such outfit, don't invest in it. Unfortunately, we are all required to invest in public education.

Public education is also an enterprise that regularly blames its clients for its failures. Education cannot, after all, be expected to deal with barbarous and sometimes even homicidal students who hate schools and everything in them, except, perhaps, for smaller kids with loose lunch money. If the students are dull and hostile, we mustn't blame the schools. We must blame the parents for their neglect and their bad examples. If the parents are ignorant and depraved, then we must blame "society." And so forth--but not too far. Those who lament thus seem not inclined to ask how "society" got to be that way, if it is that way, and whether or not public education may have made it so.
-- Richard Mitchell
Amen

United States

#12 Aug 12, 2007
Lafayette wrote:
When I went to grade school in the 50's all of the stuff that we needed in class was furnished and paid for from taxes collected . When and why did that concept disappear ? Teachers didn't have to pay for it out of their wages , nor was it donated ....
AMEN! School systems waste too much money: swimming pools, over-staffed top heavy administration loads, new buildings, cars and trucks - just to name a few.
By the way, why should an 82 year old woh's paid off his home now have to pay $700/month in taxes to pay for new school facilities for kids that aren't being taught acedemics?
Stumblebum

Kankakee, IL

#13 Aug 12, 2007
Oh, bad edit!

Reads: You can see in student test scores that "educators" know exactly what needs doing, but never don't get around to it.

Should read: You can see in student test scores that "educators" know exactly what needs doing, but never get around to it.

I wouldn't want my writing to make me look like a recent public high school grad.
Humphf

AOL

#14 Aug 12, 2007
Stumblebum wrote:
Oh, bad edit!
Reads: You can see in student test scores that "educators" know exactly what needs doing, but never don't get around to it.
Should read: You can see in student test scores that "educators" know exactly what needs doing, but never get around to it.
I wouldn't want my writing to make me look like a recent public high school grad.
Yes, the Star is offering buy outs to a lot of their long time staff, and hiring people who don't know how to put the language together in a sentence.
Off Subject

AOL

#15 Aug 12, 2007
So, why wasn't this mom arrested for leaving her daughter unattended in the vehicle.

http://www.theindychannel.com/news/13874053/d...
Stumblebum

Kankakee, IL

#16 Aug 12, 2007
Humphf wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, the Star is offering buy outs to a lot of their long time staff, and hiring people who don't know how to put the language together in a sentence.
It's hard to see how that will make it a less useful source of information. But then it's hard to see how ceasing publication would make the Star a less useful source of information.
TIME TO PAY THE REAPER

Maroa, IL

#17 Aug 12, 2007
Humphf wrote:
<quoted text>
So, you look down on people who shop at Wal-Mart?
I think he meant the part about leaving the kids in the car. Wake up stupid.
Teach Your Children

Sellersburg, IN

#18 Aug 12, 2007
Humphf wrote:
<quoted text>
So, you look down on people who shop at Wal-Mart?
Not look down but feel sorry for the people who still choose to shop there with all the facts that are available. Two examples:

In a northern Indiana town, Wal Mart is closing its current store and moving 1.5 miles down the same street building the same store just outside the city limits. Why you ask? To avoid paying the city property taxes. Corporations are doing this all over the place but Wal Mart is one of the worst offenders. Why is this bad? It puts the property tax burden on residents like you while Wal Mart rakes in record profits.

Second..why does Wal Mart have falling prices and the lowest? Although they do buy some American products, a large percentage come from places in China where kids work in sweatshops for less than a dollar a day so you can get the cheapest price at Wal Mart.

If you have any morals and understand the facts..how can you still shop at Wal Mart?
Teach Your Children

Sellersburg, IN

#19 Aug 12, 2007
Amen wrote:
<quoted text>
AMEN! School systems waste too much money: swimming pools, over-staffed top heavy administration loads, new buildings, cars and trucks - just to name a few.
By the way, why should an 82 year old woh's paid off his home now have to pay $700/month in taxes to pay for new school facilities for kids that aren't being taught acedemics?
I agree that schools waste money on many of the things you mentioned. Being from Carmel however, you must realize the importance of new buildings. The growth the northern suburbs is going through makes new buildings a necessity. How extravagant they are is another story.

Why should an 82 have to pay taxes for schools? Two reasons. One...some 82yrd old person paid taxes when they went to school. It is just part of the cycle. Second..education is an investment just like roads and other services. Without these services, our society will fall into a worsened state than it already is.

Its like saying why do I have taxes taken out of my check to pay for medicare that I don't use. 30 years from now, I will benefit from the service my kids income tax pays for.
EastSide

San Francisco, CA

#20 Aug 12, 2007
"A parent of one of Linda Zornes' first-grade students stunned the teacher when she gave her $100 and one directive...." Sure sounds like a 'helicopter mom' buying the brat kid a grade.
HamCo

San Francisco, CA

#21 Aug 12, 2007
amazed wrote:
<quoted text>
How can you worry too much about our children? I bet you shop at Walmart when it is 95 degrees outside and leave your kids in the car.
Hmmm.... Some of the fattest bank accounts in Hamilton County shop at WalMart. Frugal shopping is part of the reason.

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