Raids cast pall over dealing in antiq...

Raids cast pall over dealing in antiquities

There are 16 comments on the The Santa Fe New Mexican story from Aug 15, 2009, titled Raids cast pall over dealing in antiquities. In it, The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that:

Earlier this year, the William Siegal Gallery offered for sale, for $250,000, a pristine, prehistoric Anasazi cotton shoulder wrap a ' one of several found sealed in an urn.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Santa Fe New Mexican.

Fakes In The Market Place

Florence, AL

#1 Aug 16, 2009
This article, and one other recently, focuses some needed attention on a problem with illegally acquired Indian antiquarian artifacts in the market.

However, there is a similar problem of equal or greater magnitude in the Santa Fe market place with some CONTEMPORARY Indian arts and crafts being blatantly sold in DOZENS of Santa Fe stores on and near the Plaza.

The counterfeiting and misrepresentation of foreign articles as being Native American and authentic is growing and now rampant in Santa Fe and most other major Indian art markets. The misrepresentation and sale of these fakes is a crime under both NM and Federal laws.

The thousands of unsuspecting tourists who visit Santa Fe and inadvertently and unknowingly by these fake Indian goods (often paying many hundred or a few thousand dollars for a fake item) will probably never return to Santa Fe again once they learn they have been ripped off - and they will likely tell at least ten of their friends and relatives of their negative experience in Santa Fe. That means fewer hotel, restaurant, bar, and shop patrons here - that translates to lost tourism, lost sales tax revenue, employees being laid off and local jobs lost.
rivers2bx

Huntsville, AL

#2 Aug 16, 2009
I've seen many areas where "pot hunters" have randomly dug up artifacts, destroying sites forever. Why shouldn't stealing public property on public lands and then potentially making a profit on the stolen goods, be considered a crime and dealt with accordingly. Not that much different than someone holding up a conventional jewelry store, and authorities trying to track stolen items and determine that the current owner got items at a legitimate source, and not through a 'fence."

Since: Nov 08

Albuquerque, NM

#3 Aug 16, 2009
I actually have the lowest opinion of all those rich people who think collecting the artifacts of ancient cultures is an acceptable "hobby." I'm sure by now they realize that they are driving the wholesale looting of ethnic histories all over the globe. In many places people are plowing through ancient history with bulldozers. Why worry? Rich people will buy the stuff. Destroy our past and rob us of the ability to understand ourselves and change our future.
how does

Albuquerque, NM

#4 Aug 16, 2009
Chaya wrote:
I actually have the lowest opinion of all those rich people who think collecting the artifacts of ancient cultures is an acceptable "hobby." I'm sure by now they realize that they are driving the wholesale looting of ethnic histories all over the globe. In many places people are plowing through ancient history with bulldozers. Why worry? Rich people will buy the stuff. Destroy our past and rob us of the ability to understand ourselves and change our future.
having antiquities buried under ground help you understand your culture?
Canyon Road Dealer

Albuquerque, NM

#5 Aug 16, 2009
I deal in contemporary fine art! You can shake hands with the provenance! Come and buy contemporary fine art instead, on Canyon Road....no skeletons (or skulls) in the closet when you collect living artists!:)
Why

Albuquerque, NM

#6 Aug 16, 2009
Looters would loot; even if they could not sell the items. They simply would just keep them. They are saving history in there mind.
-
The dealers are were money is made and the real games are played. They milk the rich fool as investment games in antiquity art items. give them a a paper saying it was not stolen to go along with it. Of course such paper is never checked to see if it is a lie.

The dealers are the one who demand paper to go with such items, even if the truth the item is stolen. This is also what showed up in the game and this bust.

That document saying it came from private property, and or before a specific date; is most likely a lie.

"I'm sure by now they realize that they are driving the wholesale looting of ethnic histories all over the globe."
Buzz Saw

Kingston, Canada

#7 Aug 17, 2009
ANTIQUITIES AND THE LAW......federal statues ?
Shouldn't it be federal statutes....there was a great difference last time I looked. Come on Tom, back to English class.
and what

Santa Fe, NM

#8 Aug 17, 2009
maybe they should make a law where people can only dig up thier own peoples artifacts......white people would be so bored.

Since: Sep 08

Santa Fe, NM

#9 Aug 17, 2009
All I could think of, when I read the first paragraph of this article, was that that Anasazi shoulder wrap has disappeared into someone's collection, and the rest of us will never get a chance to see it. It's OUR heritage, not the personal property of someone who can afford to pay $250,000 for it. Either leave it where it was buried, or share it with everyone.
Fleabell

United States

#10 Aug 17, 2009
Also, don't forget that private citizens don't have any knowledge about preservation, so this cotton shoulder wrap could become a moldy rag in no time.
tribal voice

United States

#11 Aug 19, 2009
What happens to an individual or family who has befriended a so called dealer and later finds out that this person has preyed upon an elderly family member to procure their so called artifacts, the law hasn't addressed this concern and should have some recourse for returning traditional items and items still in traditional use.
The items have morevalue than a dollar figure could ever replace and flashing dollars to an elderly person in need is a pretty cheap way of doing business.
If it

Las Cruces, NM

#12 Aug 19, 2009
tribal voice wrote:
What happens to an individual or family who has befriended a so called dealer and later finds out that this person has preyed upon an elderly family member to procure their so called artifacts, the law hasn't addressed this concern and should have some recourse for returning traditional items and items still in traditional use.
The items have morevalue than a dollar figure could ever replace and flashing dollars to an elderly person in need is a pretty cheap way of doing business.
was truly still used by the tribe or a particular clan it is not an individual's property to sell. They need to be the ones attempting to reclaim their material. Obviously any museum recieving federal money would be subject to a NAGPRA and wouldn't be involved in this, but legal and ethical pressure could also be put on a dealer for recieving something that could not be sold by the seller.
cm hemet

AOL

#13 Aug 19, 2009
selser? couldnt happen to a nicer guy
crimewatcher

Parker, CO

#14 Aug 20, 2009
Buzz Saw wrote:
ANTIQUITIES AND THE LAW......federal statues ?
Shouldn't it be federal statutes....there was a great difference last time I looked. Come on Tom, back to English class.
Wonder what university he graduated from??? University of spellcheck!!!
crimewatcher

Parker, CO

#15 Aug 20, 2009
If it wrote:
<quoted text>
was truly still used by the tribe or a particular clan it is not an individual's property to sell. They need to be the ones attempting to reclaim their material. Obviously any museum recieving federal money would be subject to a NAGPRA and wouldn't be involved in this, but legal and ethical pressure could also be put on a dealer for recieving something that could not be sold by the seller.
If it,,,, u r a MORON!!!! The list of crooks who work for museums is a long one. Then they become dealers in Santa Fe.
art a phat

Billings, MT

#16 Aug 26, 2009
You people really don't get. NAGPRA was enacted to repatriate item from museums NOT to get items back from individuals. You really should read(25 U.S.C. 3001 et. seq.)before you open your mouth and insert foot!! Many items once repatriated are sold into the market/ some are buried. Either way the public does not see them!!The real grave robbers were agents and/or permitees of the Dept. of Interior.(see permit sections of 1906 or 1979 acts)and that was the PRIME reason for repatriation from federally funded museums and institutions.

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