Women Arrested On Prostitution Charge...

Women Arrested On Prostitution Charges -- Courant.com

There are 22 comments on the Hartford Courant story from Aug 21, 2007, titled Women Arrested On Prostitution Charges -- Courant.com. In it, Hartford Courant reports that:

Two women were arrested on prostitution charges and one is scheduled to be arraigned today in Superior Court in Danielson, police said.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hartford Courant.

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Sick of it

United States

#1 Aug 21, 2007
A vicimless crime.
chester

Hartford, CT

#2 Aug 21, 2007
and this is news?!

Since: Feb 07

moodus, CT

#3 Aug 21, 2007
Prostitution is not a victemless crime,however it is also not a news worthy one! Slow day in Connecticut I guess???
News is dull

Prospect, CT

#4 Aug 21, 2007
I have solicited sex every day of my life. Dinner... movies... jewerly... all "payment" for getting some. EVERY gold digging female should be arrested for prostitution!!! Why focus on these poor chicks in Willi? They are just trying to score a little cash for the dollar menu at the Arches.
Luke

Newington, CT

#5 Aug 21, 2007
guess you have a loveless situation news is dull. News is dull supports those *poor Chicks* in Willimantic, ROFL...maybe you can help them out *dull*
Mike Hawk

United States

#6 Aug 21, 2007
Doesn't get much skankier than a 46 year old drug addicted street ho. YUK!
Tripper

Los Angeles, CA

#7 Aug 21, 2007
News is dull wrote:
I have solicited sex every day of my life. Dinner... movies... jewerly... all "payment" for getting some. EVERY gold digging female should be arrested for prostitution!!! Why focus on these poor chicks in Willi? They are just trying to score a little cash for the dollar menu at the Arches.
You must have a good job, or you're the type women take advantage of. Don't breathe so hard when you first meet them, and keep your hands to yourself. See! you've already passed your first test. Wasn't that easy? Keep your money in your pocket, save it for a real freak session. You're lucky YOU DON'T HAVE A DISEASE.
Jay Tee

Greenfield, MA

#8 Aug 21, 2007
I think street prostitution should be illegal, but escort services..... maybe thats ok.
Street prostitution is not something I want going on in front of my house. Needles laying on the ground, condoms... weird people carrying on at all hours, drug-addicted thieves....
But the way these women are arrested and then quickly released doesn't accomplish much, seems to me.
Drug War Folly

Beacon Falls, CT

#9 Aug 21, 2007
"There's a direct correlation between the prostitution and our drug problem here," Curtis said.

Absolutely, except he should have said "There's a direct correlation between the prostitution and our drug prohibition here." That's because prohibition creates a black market with extortionist prices for a drug that would otherwise be very cheap. That's because prohibition criminalizes heroin consumers, forcing them into the underground and also intimidating them from seeking help when needed. Prior to prohibition, opiate addicts tended to remain respectable and productive people, but now through stigma and criminalization their lives are ruined as much by prohibition as by the drug itself.

http://jim.com/drug_peace.htm
Save A Prostitute Today

AOL

#10 Aug 21, 2007
The oldest profession in the world and still getting free publicity. Who cares? Isn't there something more interesting you could have printed? The press is just promoting prostitution by printing this type of story. Hookers don't get embarrassed. Printing their names in the papers means nothing to them. This story was about as exciting as reading about Junction 11.
Mike Hawk

United States

#11 Aug 22, 2007
Drug War Folly wrote:
"There's a direct correlation between the prostitution and our drug problem here," Curtis said.
Absolutely, except he should have said "There's a direct correlation between the prostitution and our drug prohibition here." That's because prohibition creates a black market with extortionist prices for a drug that would otherwise be very cheap. That's because prohibition criminalizes heroin consumers, forcing them into the underground and also intimidating them from seeking help when needed. Prior to prohibition, opiate addicts tended to remain respectable and productive people, but now through stigma and criminalization their lives are ruined as much by prohibition as by the drug itself.
http://jim.com/drug_peace.htm
There is a reason it is "prohibited", and you gave the reason yourself.
"... their lives are ruined as much by prohibition as by the drug itself."
You are acknowledging that drugs are ruining lives and that is why they are illegal.
CT Resident

Broad Brook, CT

#12 Aug 22, 2007
My daughter is starting at eastern this Fall. I'm worried about her being in that area. I'm stressing to her to be with other people when she is off campus etc. There are prostitutes walking Main street as well as people sleeping in the cubby's of buildings. What a scummy town. If I could afford it, she would be going somewhere else, that's for sure. They need to clean up the streets of Willimantic. It could be a nice quaint little city.
Drug War Folly

Beacon Falls, CT

#13 Aug 22, 2007
Mike Hawk wrote:
<quoted text>
There is a reason it is "prohibited", and you gave the reason yourself.
"... their lives are ruined as much by prohibition as by the drug itself."
You are acknowledging that drugs are ruining lives and that is why they are illegal.
Prohibition does NOT prevent or even decrease the ruining of lives by drugs. Rather, it makes it WORSE, as I've already said. And the point is not whether drugs are harmful --the deadly addictive drugs alcohol and tobacco are legal, ruining lives, but at least not also a source of $hundreds of billions$$ annually to organized crime, not a source of street crime in a black market of extortionist prices with no court enforcement of contracts, at least not sold with adulterants and uncertain doseage that cause most of the poisonings and overdoses. Nobody said alcohol is safe and good but the damage to public health and safety is less in a legally-regulated market than under prohibition, which is why alcoho prohibition was repealed and which is why the other drug prohibitions should also be repealed.

Why do you think alcohol prohibition was repealed? Because its good for you? Obviously not. The reason was that prohibition did not solve any of the problems associated with the drug, instead aggravating these problems while causing a host of additional problems not inherent to alcohol but rather to prohibition (black markets, unregulated product, unregulated distribution including youth access and youth involvement in the business, organized crime, street crime, corruption of government and finance, etc). All these problems are now in full bloom in the black market for the other drugs still prohibited, and yet prohibition has been a dismal failure even by its own measure, considering that illegal drugs are available to anyone who wants to buy them, regardless of age or any other factor that would be controlled in a legally regulated market.
Mike Hawk

United States

#14 Aug 23, 2007
Drug War Folly wrote:
<quoted text>
Prohibition does NOT prevent or even decrease the ruining of lives by drugs. Rather, it makes it WORSE, as I've already said. And the point is not whether drugs are harmful --the deadly addictive drugs alcohol and tobacco are legal, ruining lives, but at least not also a source of $hundreds of billions$$ annually to organized crime, not a source of street crime in a black market of extortionist prices with no court enforcement of contracts, at least not sold with adulterants and uncertain doseage that cause most of the poisonings and overdoses. Nobody said alcohol is safe and good but the damage to public health and safety is less in a legally-regulated market than under prohibition, which is why alcoho prohibition was repealed and which is why the other drug prohibitions should also be repealed.
Why do you think alcohol prohibition was repealed? Because its good for you? Obviously not. The reason was that prohibition did not solve any of the problems associated with the drug, instead aggravating these problems while causing a host of additional problems not inherent to alcohol but rather to prohibition (black markets, unregulated product, unregulated distribution including youth access and youth involvement in the business, organized crime, street crime, corruption of government and finance, etc). All these problems are now in full bloom in the black market for the other drugs still prohibited, and yet prohibition has been a dismal failure even by its own measure, considering that illegal drugs are available to anyone who wants to buy them, regardless of age or any other factor that would be controlled in a legally regulated market.
The main reason illegal drugs should stay illegal is because now there is the risk of prison for being involved with them. If that were to be taken out of the equation, we would be left with people going into a drug store, or some other retail outlet buying heroin, crack cocaine, or any other pharmaceutical and then selling it to or giving it to minors. Not that minors now do not buy illegal drugs, but now it is a felony to sell or distribute drugs, if they were legal, it would be no different than if a wino goes into a package store and gets a 17 year old kid a six-pack.
The bottom line is the drugs that are illegal are that way because they are very dangerous and cannot be controlled as easy as tobacco or alcohol.
Jay Tee

Greenfield, MA

#15 Aug 27, 2007
The bottom line is the drugs that are illegal are that way because they are very dangerous and cannot be controlled as easy as tobacco or alcohol.

Agreed- I wish people would get off the 'drugs should be legal' fantasy. It's wishfull thinking.
Ask the chinese, who experienced the opium epidemic.
Drugs are just too easy to misuse, so you have to have a powerful deterrent- jail time.
Drug War Folly

Beacon Falls, CT

#16 Aug 27, 2007
Mike Hawk wrote:
<quoted text>
The main reason illegal drugs should stay illegal is because now there is the risk of prison for being involved with them. If that were to be taken out of the equation, we would be left with people going into a drug store, or some other retail outlet buying heroin, crack cocaine, or any other pharmaceutical and then selling it to or giving it to minors. Not that minors now do not buy illegal drugs, but now it is a felony to sell or distribute drugs, if they were legal, it would be no different than if a wino goes into a package store and gets a 17 year old kid a six-pack.
The bottom line is the drugs that are illegal are that way because they are very dangerous and cannot be controlled as easy as tobacco or alcohol.
Nobody is advocating making drugs legal for kids. That's a diversion: there are many adult activities that are prohibited to children but not therefore prohibited to adults: driving, buying a gun, riding a motorcycle, having sex, joining the military, etc. Replacing the black market with a legally regulated market will make drugs less available to kids because licensed dealers will have a lot to lose by violating the age restrictions in their lawful business. Dealers now are not worried about any license but are supported by a vast market that is mostly adults. Creating a regulated market for adults will eliminate these unlicensed dealers and keep the market in the hands of licensed dealers who will observe age restrictions.
Drug War Folly

Beacon Falls, CT

#17 Aug 27, 2007
I forgot to make it plain: opponents of prohibition will support the continuation of strict laws against giving non-medical drugs to minors. As I argued above, "protecting the children" is a lousy argument for prohibiting adult activities. That could become a very long list....
Mike Hawk

United States

#18 Aug 27, 2007
Drug War Folly wrote:
I forgot to make it plain: opponents of prohibition will support the continuation of strict laws against giving non-medical drugs to minors. As I argued above, "protecting the children" is a lousy argument for prohibiting adult activities. That could become a very long list....
To make it even plainer:

Why would generally law abiding citizens want to make drugs legal that will alter one's senses making it very dangerous for them to drive, or even walk in some cases, make them violent, have them commit crimes they normally would not, become comatose thus tying up hospitals and emergency room personnel, etc. etc. etc.?
Also when these people are in possession of these drugs it makes them much more easily available to young children who may ingest something just because that is what little kids do, they put things in their mouths.
There is no good reason in the world someone should be able to go into a WalMart or CVS and pick up some crack, heroin, coke, or any other illegal drug.
I'm sorry, but your point is moot because it will never happen, it shouldn't happen and I'm going to let you get the last word in because this will be my final post on the subject, at least within this thread.
CLS

Bellows Falls, VT

#19 Jun 12, 2011
Anal?
feefefdesw

United States

#20 Aug 12, 2011
sdfggregdfrgerd

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