First Prev
of 2
Next Last
Slidersalterego

Bennettsville, SC

#1 Sep 4, 2012
I don't usually give the Banner many nods but the story about the family losing the farm was a good read.Im not shining light on someones misfortune or saying it was entertaining but in a way,it needed said from the her perspective.I took a few breaks throughout the story to reflect or visualize all the hard work and dedication it takes to run a farm.I also felt sad for the the Lady and her family.A man becomes one with his land after working it for years and it becomes a piece of his soul.Im sure they feel terrible but hopefully they'll pick up the pieces and hold their heads up.Farming is disappearing at an alarming rate and more and more young people have no idea where their food comes from.Anyways...My nod to the Banner for a emotion fiiled,thought provoking story.I pray for peace for that family.I imagine it will be a sad time.
Farmer

Morristown, TN

#2 Sep 4, 2012
It is very sad. I read the article too and I hate to see farms go away. You're right about young people, or most people for that matter, don't appreciate farmers or farming. This is one of the reasons why the railroad and the intermodal is being built right smack in the middle of this farm. Nobody cares as long as they continue having food in theirs stores.
If this keeps happening then what?
For those screaming bring the intermodal, I'd like for them to walk the 600+ acres of this viable farmland that will end up being the intermodal and darned subdivisons.
I am glad you have reflected on this situation. I really wish more people would reflect on this I am very happy that you have taken the time to think about what is happening to a good family due to a few backstabbers and economic issues. Now the developers and the railroad gets what they want and a great family is ruined and out on the streets.
It is not only a sad time for the Manley's, but very sad day indeed for New Market and Jefferson County.
Slidersalterego

Bennettsville, SC

#3 Sep 4, 2012
Farmer wrote:
It is very sad. I read the article too and I hate to see farms go away. You're right about young people, or most people for that matter, don't appreciate farmers or farming. This is one of the reasons why the railroad and the intermodal is being built right smack in the middle of this farm. Nobody cares as long as they continue having food in theirs stores.
If this keeps happening then what?
For those screaming bring the intermodal, I'd like for them to walk the 600+ acres of this viable farmland that will end up being the intermodal and darned subdivisons.
I am glad you have reflected on this situation. I really wish more people would reflect on this I am very happy that you have taken the time to think about what is happening to a good family due to a few backstabbers and economic issues. Now the developers and the railroad gets what they want and a great family is ruined and out on the streets.
It is not only a sad time for the Manley's, but very sad day indeed for New Market and Jefferson County.
Farmer, I always felt uneasy about the Dairy buyout in the 80s.Look at the effects it has had.But with the costs of everything now,We wouldnt have made it anyways. I've reached down and picked up enough soil and let it fall between my fingers to know it means something.If I would have known about those injuries her sons endured,I would've been right there helping.It probably would'nt have changed the end result,(with the financials) but it wouldve been the right thing to do.Remember Farm Aid? those were the good ole days.Now,our tax money saves big companies and Union retirement plans from bankruptcy.Damned this mess.
not exactly

Dandridge, TN

#4 Sep 5, 2012
There was more to that story than printed. I hate to see anyone lose their home but that family turned their backs on their grandchildren. The youngest son has some serious problems but they left his kids hanging with no financial resources at all. Good people just do not let children suffer. If they are going to tell the story then the need to tell the whole story from all sides. It was certanly heartwarming but it also painted a picture that was fiction.
Bingo

United States

#5 Sep 5, 2012
Slidersalterego wrote:
I don't usually give the Banner many nods but the story about the family losing the farm was a good read.Im not shining light on someones misfortune or saying it was entertaining but in a way,it needed said from the her perspective.I took a few breaks throughout the story to reflect or visualize all the hard work and dedication it takes to run a farm.I also felt sad for the the Lady and her family.A man becomes one with his land after working it for years and it becomes a piece of his soul.Im sure they feel terrible but hopefully they'll pick up the pieces and hold their heads up.Farming is disappearing at an alarming rate and more and more young people have no idea where their food comes from.Anyways...My nod to the Banner for a emotion fiiled,thought provoking story.I pray for peace for that family.I imagine it will be a sad time.
The same whines, cries and gripes were voiced when TVA came through building the dams and also when the interstate system was built. Now just ask yourselves, where would we be without those things?
Slidersalterego

Bennettsville, SC

#6 Sep 5, 2012
Bingo wrote:
<quoted text>
The same whines, cries and gripes were voiced when TVA came through building the dams and also when the interstate system was built. Now just ask yourselves, where would we be without those things?
Yes,my family was affected by both.Displaced by TVA in the 40s from good farmland and giving up 45 acres to the I-40 in the 70s.I wouldnt say they "whined,cried or griped". They had their own power supply and got around fine and when they didnt,they made do with what they had. At $5 mill. In debt,there has to be bad management or bad fortune involved,which is different than TVA or the state taking 'clear' land for projects.
Greener Pastures

United States

#7 Sep 5, 2012
Bingo wrote:
<quoted text>
The same whines, cries and gripes were voiced when TVA came through building the dams and also when the interstate system was built. Now just ask yourselves, where would we be without those things?
You maybe correct but I wish there was nothing here in this county but cattle and hog farms with a handful of landowners only, like it used to be in the old old days before the cities or towns were built, just farmland and a few barns with wagons as transportation don't need no trains and you worked or starved.
Slidersalterego

Bennettsville, SC

#8 Sep 5, 2012
not exactly wrote:
There was more to that story than printed. I hate to see anyone lose their home but that family turned their backs on their grandchildren. The youngest son has some serious problems but they left his kids hanging with no financial resources at all. Good people just do not let children suffer. If they are going to tell the story then the need to tell the whole story from all sides. It was certanly heartwarming but it
also painted a picture that was fiction.
I didnt fall off the turnip wagon yesterday,Friend.At $5 mil in debt,it aint hard to tell things got out of hand.But that wasnt the point I was making.I dont want to go into the 'hows and whys' on Topix about what happened nor do I seek to place blame.Im talking about farming the land and a way of life that is disappearing at a rapid pace. Im for preserving farmland as much as developers are for developing it. What is done is done and the story in the paper reflected the way she felt.While one read the story,it was obvious there were multiple sides.I felt for her,the family,the creditors,the way of life and call me crazy but I felt a loss about the farmland that had seen many an hour of sweat and toil. I reckon a person has to have a little farming in their blood to understand.
Enough

Dandridge, TN

#9 Sep 5, 2012
Farmers always bitch and complain. They call themselves conservatives and moan about welfare recipients. Then they take endless subsidies from the government themselves. They complain when it's dry, and they complain when it rains. I have no sympathy and neither should anyone else.
asinfo

United States

#10 Sep 5, 2012
copied from Standard Banner
BY STEVE MARION Standard Banner Staff Writer StandardBanner.com

Each year, Tennessee loses an average of 1,300 family farms and 100,000 acres of farmland.

Between 2002 and 2010, the number of licensed Grade A dairies in the state dropped from over 900 to less than 450.

Going faster than you would have thought, wonder why?
Farming is a business that has been subsidized by the taxpayers and pay little taxes themselves.
You would think more big corporations would buy into farming?
Better hope the railroad gets all that land and not just 13 acres. If a developer like the ones who have come to Jeff county in the past and lied every breathe get it the taxpayers will get stuck again with substandard roads and houses.
Slidersalterego

Bennettsville, SC

#11 Sep 5, 2012
Enough wrote:
Farmers always bitch and complain. They call themselves conservatives and moan about welfare recipients. Then they take endless subsidies from the government themselves. They complain when it's dry, and they complain when it rains. I have no sympathy and neither should anyone else.
Speaking for myself,I dont know anyone that takes subsidies,so understand my opinions on smaller farming.Did you just compare Farmers with Welfare recipients? Complaining about the rain or the dry weather comes with the job description.Im sure something you have eaten un the last month was grown by someone who has complained about the weather. Sometimes Im more sympathetic to the situation than the person. Betchya never have complained about the weather before in your life,right? Not that you would have money invested in Time,fertilize,fuel,seed,wear/ tear and sweat on seed that might not come up or gets flooded out.
Slidersalterego

Bennettsville, SC

#12 Sep 5, 2012
Seems like a few have the misconceptions about local farmers getting rich off of subsidies and paying Greenbelt taxes.Get real. Would a family grow produce,pumpkins and scrape and claw on a piece of ground to make a dollar if they could recieve subsidies? Hell,thatd be like a welfare recipient working at McDonalds. What would be the use? Look at large corporate farms for abuse of subsidies.
Whyisit

United States

#13 Sep 5, 2012
Slidersalterego wrote:
Seems like a few have the misconceptions about local farmers getting rich off of subsidies and paying Greenbelt taxes.Get real. Would a family grow produce,pumpkins and scrape and claw on a piece of ground to make a dollar if they could recieve subsidies? Hell,thatd be like a welfare recipient working at McDonalds. What would be the use? Look at large corporate farms for abuse of subsidies.
Why are the produce prices at the Dandridge farmer market so much higher priced than food City or other grocery stores? Does it cost that much more to have a garden these days than Food City can truck it in? Still like Food City.
Slidersalterego

Columbus, NC

#14 Sep 5, 2012
Whyisit wrote:
<quoted text>
Why are the produce prices at the Dandridge farmer market so much higher priced than food City or other grocery stores? Does it cost that much more to have a garden these days than Food City can truck it in? Still like Food City.
There is supposed to be some kind of premium to "home grown" or "organic" vegetables verses store bought foods that honestly,we dont know for sure were they came from,ect.But luckily for you,a Food City shopper,you can buy locally grown produce there. Before this economy,folks got used to paying more for garden vegetables,so in my opinion the prices are a little high.Course,seed and fertilizer has tripled in price too,so I see both sides. I raised and sold produce for a number of years for extra spending money and I like the idea of someone having safe,chemical free food on the tables for their family. Its worth a little extra. But like everything else it seems,its harder to make profits and shoppers are searching in earnest for a bargain.I really dont compare Dandridge market to the old fashioned "roadside stands" or 'pick your own" operations.Theres a certain amount of commercialization there.And,since prices in the stores are higher,prices at the open markets are higher than they used to be.
Amun Ra

Salisbury, NC

#15 Sep 5, 2012
It's really sad to see another farm lost but when you owe $5 million you got a problem. Over the past couple of years I've read about the foreclosure situation the Manley's got theirselves into, in the back of the Standard in the public notices section. Management at the Co-op ought to be run out of town over the over $200,000 bill the Manley's racked up there. And it doesn't stop with the Co-op, several other agricultural related businesses are owed huge amounts by them. It truly is unfortunate they are loosing everything but bad money management will always come back to bite you. You can't keep borrowing and spending your way out of debt. Hopefully others will learn from this mistake. As for the farmers and farms, they will adapt and go on. In the early 1950's, one American farmer fed around 15-20 people, now the American farmer feeds almost 200 people with far less land and far fewer farmers. Agriculture is the basis of all societies and farmers are the stewards of the land and society. As Daniel Webster said, "When tillage begins, other arts follow, Therefore farmers are the founders of civilization." With that being said, farmers where toiling with the land before the Manley's and they'll be doing it still long after they are gone.
Slidersalterego

Columbus, NC

#16 Sep 5, 2012
Amun Ra wrote:
It's really sad to see another farm lost but when you owe $5 million you got a problem. Over the past couple of years I've read about the foreclosure situation the Manley's got theirselves into, in the back of the Standard in the public notices section. Management at the Co-op ought to be run out of town over the over $200,000 bill the Manley's racked up there. And it doesn't stop with the Co-op, several other agricultural related businesses are owed huge amounts by them. It truly is unfortunate they are loosing everything but bad money management will always come back to bite you. You can't keep borrowing and spending your way out of debt. Hopefully others will learn from this mistake. As for the farmers and farms, they will adapt and go on. In the early 1950's, one American farmer fed around 15-20 people, now the American farmer feeds almost 200 people with far less land and far fewer farmers. Agriculture is the basis of all societies and farmers are the stewards of the land and society. As Daniel Webster said, "When tillage begins, other arts follow, Therefore farmers are the founders of civilization." With that being said, farmers where toiling with the land before the Manley's and they'll be doing it still long after they are gone.
You are exactly right.And there are still family farms and Farmers in this county and Country that are doing a great job,thankfully.Great post.
Say What

United States

#17 Sep 6, 2012
Owe 5 million, how did they get away with this?
They should run for political office.
thinkaboutit

United States

#18 Sep 6, 2012
Whyisit wrote:
<quoted text>
Why are the produce prices at the Dandridge farmer market so much higher priced than food City or other grocery stores? Does it cost that much more to have a garden these days than Food City can truck it in? Still like Food City.
Stop and think about what you just said....prices may be somewhat higher, but the produce was picked hours before arriving to the market. The produce was hand picked, not by machines and has been handled accordingly. You buy fresher and tastier food. If that's a problem, I suggest you buy "real value canned corn, green beans,tomatoes" at food city. Sounds like you think food is food. Get your can opener ready! You apparently do not have "farming sense"!

'
Slider

Mauldin, SC

#19 Sep 6, 2012
It would be great if we could get SlidersAlterEgo's opinion on this topic. Oh wait he already has 70% of them. Hey alterego shut the f*ck up
Slidersalterego

Charlotte, NC

#20 Sep 6, 2012
Slider wrote:
It would be great if we could get SlidersAlterEgo's opinion on this topic. Oh wait he already has 70% of them. Hey alterego shut the f*ck up
Actually,I've only commented on 47.3% of Topix posts. I pass on the trashy ones you love so well. Bothering people like you,makes my day. Im used to having little sawed off Haters.Love you too.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Dandridge Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
walts hitching post 11 hr DirtyFrank 17
Jefferson County Official's 11 hr DirtyFrank 4
haylee Nicole Edgar from Lee couny 15 hr Turd lips 3
Serious Corruption in Jefferson County Government? Wed Looking at it 54
Perkins tea Wed lol 15
dandridge police (Dec '10) Mar 2 opps 36
Moonshine distillery may be coming to Dandridge (Nov '13) Feb 28 Truth Seeker 4

Flood Warning for Jefferson County was issued at March 05 at 12:00PM CST

Dandridge Dating
Find my Match
More from around the web

Dandridge People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 2:46 pm PST

Bleacher Report 2:46PM
Panthers Sign TE Olsen to 3-Year Extension
ESPN 3:04 PM
Olsen inks 3-year, $22.5M deal with Panthers
Yahoo! Sports 3:14 PM
Panthers give Greg Olsen 3-year, $22.5M contract extension
CBS Sports 4:38 PM
Greg Olsen signs 3-year extension with Panthers: 4 things to know
NFL 4:47 PM
Ereck Flowers of Miami a possible fit for Carolina Panthers