Americans unload prized belongings to...

Americans unload prized belongings to make ends meet

There are 32 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Apr 29, 2008, titled Americans unload prized belongings to make ends meet. In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

The for-sale listings on the online hub Craigslist come with plaintive notices, like the one from the teenager in Georgia who said her mother lost her job and pleaded, "Please buy anything you can to help out." ...

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“Don't protect me from me!”

Since: Jul 07

Reston, VA

#27 May 5, 2008
same ol song wrote:
<quoted text>
Ahh, judging by your posts, you must mean the skills of unbridled greed and questionable ethics.
"And you have a choice as to whether you want to invest in them or patronize their business. So what's the problem? They only cost you money if you allow it. "
Funny, I didn't buy property with a sub-prime mortgage or stock in any related corporation, but it's costing me (and all of us) a bundle.
Yes of course only greedy unethical people are able to obtain skills that have a high market value!

As for the value of your house, it only costs you if you need to sell or if the government decides to use your tax dollars to bail out those that weren't as smart as you. And of course if you need to sell you'll be able to buy another property at a depressed price so you end up no worse or better off?

“Don't protect me from me!”

Since: Jul 07

Reston, VA

#28 May 5, 2008
same ol song wrote:
<quoted text>
You must be very fortunate indeed, if you haven't been affected. I guess you haven't read about the global ramifications either, so it would be pointless to debate economics. The effects will carry well into future generations.
Hasn't impacted me because I didn't overleverage myself and I don't have to move if i don't want to.

The value my house lost over the past year was not value I was counting on for anything.
same ol song

Three Rivers, MI

#29 May 5, 2008
NoFreeRides wrote:
<quoted text>
Hasn't impacted me because I didn't overleverage myself and I don't have to move if i don't want to.
The value my house lost over the past year was not value I was counting on for anything.
Housing values haven't impacted me a bit. I'm not overleveraged either. And I agree that you really have to question what you read in the media, because I am acutley aware of the nursing shortage.

The cost to all of us is the fallout from the sub-prime morgate mess. When our government helps bail out the likes of Bear Stearns, lowers the federal funds rate to artificially low levels, sends rebates to encourage consumer spending and talks about bailing out folks whose morgages are underwater because they were "speculating" in the housing market, there's a real problem.

Much (all?) of this will increase the national debt and put an additonal burden on future generations. My concern is less for me, but more for our children.
same ol song

Three Rivers, MI

#30 May 5, 2008
NoFreeRides wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes of course only greedy unethical people are able to obtain skills that have a high market value!
No, but they come in handy if you have your eyes set on the CEO spot.
Jesse

Macomb, MI

#31 May 5, 2008
If these people were not using their homes as ATM's over the past five years they wouldn't be in this situation.

I only use cash for my purchases and if I were not reading it in the papers, I wouldn't even know the economy sucks so much right now.

If everyone were fiscally conservative in the first place, they wouldn't have to sell off all of the useless crap they've bought on someone else's dime.

I am enjoying watching these people's lives go down the drain. People such as myself can swoop in with our hard saved cash and get some real bargains.

Someone else's losses are my gains.

I have been laughing all the way to the bank.

LIVE WITHIN YOUR MEANS, PEOPLE!!!

“Don't protect me from me!”

Since: Jul 07

Reston, VA

#32 May 6, 2008
same ol song wrote:
<quoted text>
Housing values haven't impacted me a bit. I'm not overleveraged either. And I agree that you really have to question what you read in the media, because I am acutley aware of the nursing shortage.
The cost to all of us is the fallout from the sub-prime morgate mess. When our government helps bail out the likes of Bear Stearns, lowers the federal funds rate to artificially low levels, sends rebates to encourage consumer spending and talks about bailing out folks whose morgages are underwater because they were "speculating" in the housing market, there's a real problem.
Much (all?) of this will increase the national debt and put an additonal burden on future generations. My concern is less for me, but more for our children.
Agreed! That is why I am so vehemently opposed to government programs that penalize the prudent in order to bail people out from their poor choices.

“Don't protect me from me!”

Since: Jul 07

Reston, VA

#33 May 6, 2008
same ol song wrote:
<quoted text>
No, but they come in handy if you have your eyes set on the CEO spot.
I know many CEO's and the vast majority of them are honest, compassionate hard working people.

In fact, I would suggest that there are far more unethical politicians than there are unethical CEO's.

Politicians forget that their job is to do what is best for the society as a whole not what is best for their chances of re-election. How amny do you think actually do that.

A CEO's job is to make as much money as possible for the company's shareholders. Most are focused on that because it also benefits them.
same ol song

Three Rivers, MI

#34 May 6, 2008
NoFreeRides wrote:
<quoted text>
I know many CEO's and the vast majority of them are honest, compassionate hard working people.
In fact, I would suggest that there are far more unethical politicians than there are unethical CEO's.
Politicians forget that their job is to do what is best for the society as a whole not what is best for their chances of re-election. How amny do you think actually do that.
A CEO's job is to make as much money as possible for the company's shareholders. Most are focused on that because it also benefits them.
I'm in total agreement with you concerning politicians. I also don't think all CEOs are bad, but to really delve into the underlying issues I have with some of them is beyond what this forum should address. It's been nice sharing views.

“I pity the fool !!”

Since: Jan 08

Hampton, VA

#35 May 6, 2008
NoFreeRides wrote:
<quoted text>
I know many CEO's and the vast majority of them are honest, compassionate hard working people.
In fact, I would suggest that there are far more unethical politicians than there are unethical CEO's.
Politicians forget that their job is to do what is best for the society as a whole not what is best for their chances of re-election. How amny do you think actually do that.
A CEO's job is to make as much money as possible for the company's shareholders. Most are focused on that because it also benefits them.
I agree with you on your previous post about bailing out fiscally irresponsible individuals.

However, I do not believe that the primary role of CEO's is solely to make profit, but to build a stronger company (which making a profit is part of). My concern is companies whose sole motivation is attaining the highest profit yield possible, regardless of the health of the company as a whole.
Save the vegetables

Scranton, PA

#36 May 6, 2008
That's sort of the idea; you know, run a profitable business and provide shareholders with a return on their investment. Or are you a socialist that believes you deserve something for doing nothing?
Think 1st wrote:
"Meanwhile, soaring gas and food prices haven't kept pace with meager wage growth."
Yet corporations, their boards and CEO's reap huge profits and bonuses.

“Don't protect me from me!”

Since: Jul 07

Reston, VA

#37 May 6, 2008
Think 1st wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with you on your previous post about bailing out fiscally irresponsible individuals.
However, I do not believe that the primary role of CEO's is solely to make profit, but to build a stronger company (which making a profit is part of). My concern is companies whose sole motivation is attaining the highest profit yield possible, regardless of the health of the company as a whole.
Agreed! The CEO has a responsibility to balance long-term and short-term goals in order to maximize shareholder value. That balance may or may not include being a little mor generous with the workforce. It really depends on the particular business and whether the workforce is a competitive advantage or a commodity.

“I pity the fool !!”

Since: Jan 08

Hampton, VA

#38 May 6, 2008
Save the vegetables wrote:
That's sort of the idea; you know, run a profitable business and provide shareholders with a return on their investment. Or are you a socialist that believes you deserve something for doing nothing?
<quoted text>
Do you even know what socialism is? Well obviously not if you think that you get something for doing nothing in it.

And my statements in regards to CEO's and profit were further clarified in subsequent posts. Try to keep up with the thread.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

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