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Remember This

Columbus, GA

#1 Mar 20, 2013
On the banks of the Chattahoochee, where the piedmont meets the plain,
the birds in trees singing sounds
washed by gentle rain
---way down.........
the tender age of yesterday,
the promise of today.
Take pride is what she offers you and help her on her way.
For all that she may ever be, be sure that you...
are Columbus Georgia

Since: Jan 07

Location Shown

#5 Mar 22, 2013
The Campptown ladies sing this song,
Doo-da, Doo-da
The Camptown racetrack's five miles long
Oh, de doo-da day

Goin' to run all night
Goin' to run all day
I bet my money on a bob-tailed nag
Somebody bet on the gray

Oh, the long tailed filly and the big black horse,
Doo-da, doo-da
Come to a mud hole and they all cut across,
Oh, de doo-da day

Goin' to run all night
Goin' to run all day
I bet my money on a bob-tailed nag
Somebody bet on the gray
Larry

Atlanta, GA

#6 Mar 22, 2013
Remember This wrote:
On the banks of the Chattahoochee, where the piedmont meets the plain,
the birds in trees singing sounds
washed by gentle rain
---way down.........
the tender age of yesterday,
the promise of today.
Take pride is what she offers you and help her on her way.
For all that she may ever be, be sure that you...
are Columbus Georgia
I grew up in Columbus and remember this playing on TV as part of the Chamber of Commerce or visitors bureau, I don't remember that but I do remember the song, it had musical parts from the Columbus Stockade Blues tastefully woven through it and was a great song for the time.
Can anyone find a link to the recording?
Rozelle

Columbus, GA

#7 Mar 23, 2013
You people are fantastic, your knowledge of the intricacies of Columbus is truly amazing.
Remember This

Columbus, GA

#8 Mar 26, 2013
http://youtu.be/MiEKP5sSdG4

A much simpler time.

Since: Jan 07

Location Shown

#11 Mar 27, 2013

Since: Jan 07

Location Shown

#13 Mar 27, 2013
He wouild put a thin line on a white background,







then it's an old shed trees and a barbed wire fence,

then shadows would make it totally different,

I can't draw, paint and those that can do it hats off,...lol

“New poetry book coming soon”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#14 Mar 27, 2013
Reef shark wrote:
<quoted text>I just recently found out that Bob Ross did some of the paintings for the Andy Griffith show.The endings where they run the closing credits!
That's some news to me, I remember those illustrations in the closing credits of early episodes but had no idea Bob Ross was the artist.

I always was a fan of Ross.
Columbus Native

Oklahoma City, OK

#15 Mar 28, 2013
Columbus "I shall return" said Mcarthur and me too!

“New poetry book coming soon”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#17 May 16, 2015
Jack S wrote:
Man o'man those were the days of trying to catch the biggest fish to win a Zebco 404 on Sportsmans Lodge.
Ridley Bell was the man.
https://youtu.be/ieLSmRP6Yro
Saw him once as a kid at Spano's restaurant. A real nice man.
Hello Jack, good to find that those old Sportsman's Lodge videos are still around.

:D
flokaiser

Colorado Springs, CO

#18 Nov 12, 2016
Remember This wrote:
On the banks of the Chattahoochee, where the piedmont meets the plain,
the birds in trees singing sounds
washed by gentle rain
---way down.........
the tender age of yesterday,
the promise of today.
Take pride is what she offers you and help her on her way.
For all that she may ever be, be sure that you...
are Columbus Georgia
Sorry, must disagree on the words
On the banks of the Chattahoochee
Where the Piedmont meets the plain
And the verdant valley's Georgia Pines
Are washed by a gentle rain...
George John

Columbus, GA

#24 Nov 16, 2016
Medic5922 wrote:
Some of the links are listed...
But The Breeze Kings do a cover of one or two of them.
Heard them at Fox Hall a while back.

Good times.
It's an old country song.

“New poetry book coming soon”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#25 Nov 26, 2016
flokaiser wrote:
<quoted text>

Sorry, must disagree on the words
On the banks of the Chattahoochee
Where the Piedmont meets the plain
And the verdant valley's Georgia Pines
Are washed by a gentle rain...
Based on the old country song "Columbus Stockade Blues"...

Similar lyrics and exact same melody.

&#128512;
David Tolbert

Jacksonville Beach, FL

#26 Feb 4, 2017
This song was written and recorded by a local to Columbus, Bobby Powers. He and my mom dated for a brief time when I was a kid and remember hearing him debut it in his apartment to us. It was a great song, and contrary to a previous post, bore no resemblance whatsoever to "Camptown Ladies."
General T Zod

United States

#27 Feb 4, 2017
David Tolbert wrote:
This song was written and recorded by a local to Columbus, Bobby Powers. He and my mom dated for a brief time when I was a kid and remember hearing him debut it in his apartment to us. It was a great song, and contrary to a previous post, bore no resemblance whatsoever to "Camptown Ladies."
Which song in specific?
General T Zod

United States

#28 Feb 4, 2017
Remember This wrote:
On the banks of the Chattahoochee, where the piedmont meets the plain,
the birds in trees singing sounds
washed by gentle rain
---way down.........
the tender age of yesterday,
the promise of today.
Take pride is what she offers you and help her on her way.
For all that she may ever be, be sure that you...
are Columbus Georgia
This was an old Country Music song.........
Colonel Sun

United States

#29 Feb 4, 2017
Remember This wrote:
On the banks of the Chattahoochee, where the piedmont meets the plain,
the birds in trees singing sounds
washed by gentle rain
---way down.........
the tender age of yesterday,
the promise of today.
Take pride is what she offers you and help her on her way.
For all that she may ever be, be sure that you...
are Columbus Georgia
Columbus Stockade Blues was the original song...
General Zod

United States

#30 Feb 5, 2017
Big Time wrote:
The Campptown ladies sing this song,
Doo-da, Doo-da
The Camptown racetrack's five miles long
Oh, de doo-da day

Goin' to run all night
Goin' to run all day
I bet my money on a bob-tailed nag
Somebody bet on the gray

Oh, the long tailed filly and the big black horse,
Doo-da, doo-da
Come to a mud hole and they all cut across,
Oh, de doo-da day

Goin' to run all night
Goin' to run all day
I bet my money on a bob-tailed nag
Somebody bet on the gray
Columbus GA guy wrote this?
General T Zod

United States

#33 Feb 7, 2017
Larry wrote:
<quoted text>

I grew up in Columbus and remember this playing on TV as part of the Chamber of Commerce or visitors bureau, I don't remember that but I do remember the song, it had musical parts from the Columbus Stockade Blues tastefully woven through it and was a great song for the time.
Can anyone find a link to the recording?
Hopefully soon!

“New poetry book coming soon”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

#34 Feb 8, 2017
Slime Joe wrote:
<quoted text>

Way down in Columbus Stockade was the original song.
True, written by Darby and Tarlton:

==========
From Wikipedia...

Darby and Tarlton were an early country music duo, who achieved some level of success in the late 1920s. The duo consisted of Tom Darby (born August 25, 1891[1] Columbus, Georgia - died August 20, 1971) and Jimmie Tarlton,(born May 8, 1892 Cheraw, South Carolina - died November 29, 1979 Phenix City, Alabama).

Tarlton grew up on a farm in Chesterfield County, South Carolina learning folk songs from an early age. His parents were sharecroppers and he had to help out with the chores. He still managed to find the time to learn the slide guitar and banjo. After working as a street musician in the 1920s, Tarlton met Frank Ferera who taught him how to play the Hawaiian guitar. Tarlton soon moved to Columbus, Georgia where he met Tom Darby. They began performing together and shortly, they were offered a chance to make a recording for Columbia Records. Two songs were cut on April 5, 1927 and the recording sold well enough to allow a second recording session. On November 10, 1927 they recorded four songs, among them "Birmingham Jail" and "Columbus Stockade Blues". The two songs, coupled on one record, became the duo's biggest hits selling more than 200 000 copies. Darby and Tarlton recorded 63 songs between 1927 and 1933. In the early 1930s they became hostile towards each other and went their separate ways professionally. Their hostility seemed to be about royalty issues. Darby DID, however, visit Tarlton occasionally.

Tom Darby formed a short lived duo in 1931 together with Jesse Pitts, called "The Georgia Wildcats". Darby and Tarlton both retired in 1935. In 1963, Darby and Tarlton reunited to perform in Weracoba Park (known locally as "Lakebottom") when they agreed to be part of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra's opening pops concert.[2] Thomas P. Darby's nephew Richard "Ricky" Whitley claims that he learned guitar from Tom Darby and Jimmy Tarlton.[3] Darby was quoted as saying in a 1963 interview with The Columbus Enquirer (now known as The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer) regarding the opening pops concert performance that "Tarlton’s fine wife said we sounded even better than before. Made goose pimples come up on her arms, she said." Darby was drafted during World War I, but was shortly thereafter honorably discharged due to being "unfit to serve" (flat feet).

Darby was married to Alma "Olene" Darby (née Brown) until his death at the Columbus Medical Center after a long bout with lung cancer. He was interred in Columbus, Georgia's Riverdale Cemetery in the Veteran's section. His wife died in 1984 after a brief illness and is buried beside him. The song "Little Ola" was actually written by Darby as a tribute to his wife ("Olene" Darby was several years his junior). After retiring from the music business, Darby had other business ventures, including a stint "running moonshine". He would row a boat filled with moonshine from a small island near Phenix City, Alabama (where his still was located) to the Columbus, Georgia side across the Chattahoochee River. A simple yet effective method was employed to avoid prosecution. If "Olene" saw a "revenooer" (as they were called), she would wave a dark handkerchief. If it was safe, she would wave a light-colored handkerchief. On at least one occasion, a "revenooer" had shown up...and a dark-colored handkerchief was waved. Darby reversed course, rowing back to the Alabama side. When the agent approached Mrs. Darby, he asked what she was doing. She replied, "I was waving to my husband." When asked why he'd turned around, she replied, "He must have forgotten something."

During the folk revival of the 1960s, Tarlton performed again.
==========

And so it goes...

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