To Boosterthon or Not Boosterthon... ...

To Boosterthon or Not Boosterthon... that is the question

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What is the DL

Woodstock, GA

#1 Sep 23, 2009
I liked the Boosterthon Fun Run, but I'm against the new aged deceptive marketing/peer pressure technique they use.

It seems a lot of parents that are against fundraisers are also subjective to peer pressure.
I just donate what I can, IF I want to... that's that.

I tell my kids I'll buy them the prizes they see, if they get on Honor Roll... good motivator for them!

I will not go door-to-door or ask relatives for money.... I'll leave that job for the teachers.

If the teachers have to explain to someone why they didn't meet their financial goal, then that's part of their job with THEIR employer... this puts the pressure back on the teachers, they now have the option of cutting a check for missing portion, asking THEIR relatives for money or telling their employer they didn't make their goal... pretty simple to me.

I spend $150 per child, every year on supplies before the school year started, curriculum night was a ploy for more donations, each teacher is looking for more donations for their classes throughout the year... it's a non-stop money pit under the guise that if you don't do it, your kids will suffer.... this is total BS.
SAEmommy

Douglasville, GA

#2 Nov 2, 2009
Boosterthon is very successful at raising money at the cost of our kids and the school:
- Boosterthon full-time employees come into the classrooms each day for 2 weeks checking for pledges and demanding 100% participation and $200 pledges. Several little kids on our block came home crying and/or had nightmares.
- Boosterthon staff acts like time is money and randomly interrupt classroom activities with no respect for what teachers are trying to do.
- GA PTA only cares about money, even if they only get half of what is raised. Question for the PTA: Does the means justify the end? What are you spending the money on, after helping to put little kids through this? Actual classroom materials or ice cream socials and t-shirts?
- School principals only care about pleasing the PTA so they get nominated for some PTA award, plus there are all sort of gift card rewards for the administration at the school.
daddosndonts

Lancaster, SC

#3 Nov 2, 2009
I am concerned about the process in which my children's PTA is pushing for donations and money. This boosterthon pledge pressure has surmounted into my 6 yr old melting down nightly b/c he didn't get pledges or the kiddie prizes. I understand schools run tight ships with regarding to funding, but its a shame these kids are exposed to such money mongering pressures by adults. We donate goods directly to the classroom and feel we do our part along with paying property taxes (SC cars and house). Public schools need to focus on academics 95-100% of the 180 day schedule vs. wasting kids time on Boosterthon crud. Leave my kids alone!!! Go educate!!!
jcfather

Jacksonville, FL

#5 Feb 1, 2010
Boosterthon is great! I believe a lot of you parents who don't like probably never got to actually see them in the classroom. I don't know how you can judge them based on what you hear.
They don't "push" pledges.
They actually get taught cool character traits and coming from the boosterthon guys, good role models, it actually means something.
These guys are not in it for the money.
Wake up before you start criticizing. Visit a classroom.
FundraiseCrazeGo ttoStop

Fort Mill, SC

#6 Feb 4, 2010
Well, if they don't "push" for pledges, then why does my daughter also cry because I keep telling her I am not going to donate? She wants to take money out of her piggy bank to donate to the school. She feels she has to get that wristband!! I am not willing to pledge a minimum of $1 / lap at 35 laps max for 4 children in the school. There isn't even anywhere on the pledge to do a flat rate or less than $1 a lap. That just shows greed and I'm not willing to partake. The competition among the classrooms and peers is overwhelmingly high and embarrassing. Not to mention the Principal calling every night begging that each child at least donates $3 / lap -- which is $105 a student!! I have more than one child going to this school and to ask for it in this way is just not right. I also researched Boosterthon and they take 49% of the money!!
Learn your facts

Charlotte, NC

#7 Mar 25, 2010
FundraiseCrazeGottoStop wrote:
Well, if they don't "push" for pledges, then why does my daughter also cry because I keep telling her I am not going to donate? She wants to take money out of her piggy bank to donate to the school. She feels she has to get that wristband!! I am not willing to pledge a minimum of $1 / lap at 35 laps max for 4 children in the school. There isn't even anywhere on the pledge to do a flat rate or less than $1 a lap. That just shows greed and I'm not willing to partake. The competition among the classrooms and peers is overwhelmingly high and embarrassing. Not to mention the Principal calling every night begging that each child at least donates $3 / lap -- which is $105 a student!! I have more than one child going to this school and to ask for it in this way is just not right. I also researched Boosterthon and they take 49% of the money!!
Participating schools retain 52% of the donations, which to an inexperienced person may not sound like much but is actually a fantastic yield. Add to that that over 90% of pledges are fulfilled and you have a highly efficient and lucrative fund raising event. The kids are excited to participate, they learn good character traits and fundamentals on the importance of exercise and being healthy.

I love the parents that use the excuse like "I pay my taxes, I donate baby wipes to the class room, I do my part..." When we ran our first boosterthon run the parents that complained the most had the most kids in the school, were the greatest drain on resources, and gave the least ($0) to our PTA fund drives.

If you do not want your kids to participate that is fine, but try not to ruin the event for everyone else. We actually had parents tell their children to boo the Fun Run people when they came into the classroom. Pathetic.
LeanJedi

Marietta, GA

#8 Aug 25, 2010
jcfather wrote:
Boosterthon is great! I believe a lot of you parents who don't like probably never got to actually see them in the classroom. I don't know how you can judge them based on what you hear.
They don't "push" pledges.
They actually get taught cool character traits and coming from the boosterthon guys, good role models, it actually means something.
These guys are not in it for the money.
Wake up before you start criticizing. Visit a classroom.
My daughter described in detailed what happened. She had total meltdown. I give you benefit of doubt that you are indeed a parent and not Boosterthon marketing guy with responsibility to manage negative publicity!
Michele T

Canton, GA

#9 Sep 8, 2010
I am appalled at the tactics used for the Boosterthon - especially in the economy we are in right now. My children have started talking about the Boosterthon & I have felt overwhelming pressure to suddenly donate everything we have! Since when is it our child's responsibility to be drilled in school that this Boosterthon is the most important thing in their lives and if their parents don't donate, then we are all doing something wrong. I donate to causes when I want to donate to cauases - not because I am pressured to donate to causes, especially in these hard times...I chose what I donate to carefully and because of the bully tactics being used by Boosterthon, I am now chosing not to donate at all. I will try and explain it as best I can to my children that although I still want them to compete in the race, its not about the money they raised but that they participated and tried to finish the race - end of story - thats all that matters!
saint johns fl lori

Jacksonville, FL

#10 Oct 15, 2010
Our school did Boosterthon last year, not knowing much about the program, we donated money and let our daughter ask some neighbors for donations. She collected about 200 dollars in all for her school.
This year, I had the opportunity to see the whole program in full. The philosophic problems I have with this program are many! Yes, it is a high pressure sales group. They have a young, impressionable, and captive(literally) audience. These kids are 'encouraged' to set 'goals' to win prizes like 'no homework', or 5 dollar glow balls for a 100 dollar donation. With students as young as 5 years old, prizes are shown to the class on a daily basis, and handed out to children in front of all their classmates who couldn't meet goal. My daughter has come home telling me she would make her class disappointed if she didn't get enough donations.
The young people who do the program seem to be nice enough. The company behind these young people has figured out a way to make money almost as easy as printing it!
The children whose parents cannot donate because of financial circumstances are left feeling left out. I, for one, do not like to pressure family and friends to donate money to my children's schools when I cannot reciprocate the favor. My husband lost his job and we are struggling to pay our bills. An older child has the ability to understand financial difficulties with some reason, but 5, 6, and 7 year olds? They should not be involved...
A. Public schools should not pressure children to 'raise money' for their schools. Fundraisers should be kept to a minimum and should be for small extras, not things that taxes should cover.
B. School days should not be interrupted to bribe children with prizes for their assistance in obtaining donations. This is done everyday for the 2 week program run. Competition is key, not learning, not physical fitness.
C. Prizes like no homework for a month? Hmmm, I though the objective of school was to teach core knowledge, as well as to develop lifelong learners. Shouldn't we give kids the opportunity to feel good by actually working hard and achieving something educational? Why do salespeople with no educational background have the ability to reward my children with no homework?
D. There are other ways to give our children a great education without all these fundraisers. Money does not = real learning. Every year we buy over 150.00 worth of supplies in addition to paying a hefty property tax payment. In return, we get an ok education with no extras included. Every year our administrators ask for more and more money, without much thought to whose money they are spending. I would like to see the top 10 % of the earners in our county take a 20 % paycut. Many families in the private sector were hit harder, yet they are faced with higher taxes every year. Every time the school can't supply what they are paid to supply, they raise taxes and ask parents to put up the money. In an upper class neighborhood this works well, but is it fair? Is it equal? If my school can raise 100,000 dollars for extras and the school across town can't raise anything, what happens to public education? It becomes once again- separate and unequal. Those who can divy up are not helping the state of affairs in public education.
We now hold children and teachers responsible for test scores, let's hold principals and administrators responsible for supplying what our children need within budget. In this kind of economy, it is ridiculous to pay the highest salaries to the people who have no contact with actual children. We don't need more pencil pushers who can't balance a budget.
We lost many extra-curricular activities, those activities that are left involve pay to play fees. Some as high as 1,000 dollars!
SARA

Boca Raton, FL

#11 Feb 25, 2011
mY CHILD ACCIDENTLY CLICKED MY EMAIL ID AND ENTERD PLEDGES IN BOOSTERTHRON.What should i do now.I have to still pay
SARA

Boca Raton, FL

#12 Feb 26, 2011
Please reply,I am without a job,If i can't raise money for Boosterthon,Do i have to pay from my pocket.
First Grade Teacher

Macon, GA

#13 Mar 3, 2011
I totally agree with lori.
I’ve thought a lot about Boosterthon since last year when I was first introduced to it. The Boosterthon leaders are obviously nice young men who are enthusiastic about and believe in what they are doing. The Fun Run itself is, as the name implies, lots of fun. Encouraging children to exercise is great. There are a few things, however, that concern me about the whole process.
First, the interruption to instruction is excessive. All fundraisers take some time away from instruction, but a daily interruption is too much. My students have not had a complete math period for two weeks. The short character lessons are great, but more time is spent on giving out prizes and pumping up the children to get more pledges than on the character lesson.
Also, I believe that the practice of using prizes to manipulate children to go home and beg their parents for money undermines parental authority and damages parent/child relationships. Many of these families have lost their jobs and are in serious financial trouble. Having to tell your child once or twice,“No, we just can’t afford to do this right now,” is hard enough, but having to do it every night for two weeks is unfair to parents and children.
I am concerned about what this process teaches children. Do we want a generation of Americans who feel rewarded by the satisfaction of working hard, gaining knowledge, developing creativity, and being kind to others? Or do we want a generation of Americans whose goal is to beg others for money so they can get more prizes for themselves?
I’m sure you’ve heard all of this before, and I sound like someone who is negative and doesn’t understand all of the complexities of school budgets. That might be true, but I’ve spent many years teaching children, and I tend to be very protective of them. I feel that the integrity of our relationship with our students is much more important than getting more “stuff” for our school.
Jeff with FundRunners

Alachua, FL

#14 Mar 4, 2011
There is another option out there everybody!

FundRunners has a brand new Fun Run program that gives schools the opportunity to keep as much as 80% of all the money collected while paying for the entire cost of the fundraiser and running it!

We don't believe in high pressure tactics. We do encourage students to get more pledges, but we want the kids to have an overall positive experience! You should contact me at [email protected] to find out more about our Fun Run program!
see straight through

Pensacola, FL

#15 Mar 11, 2011
This Boosterthon is unacceptable. The emotional stress that my kindergardner is under about this program is damaging. There is emotional harm being caused to your children by this orginization. Your children are being pimped out and taken advantage of plain and simple. This type of fundraising should not be tolerated. No....I repeat No outside orginazation should have representatives stationed in our public schools for a week at a time and access to your children without the consent of the parents. These people are hiding behind the sales tactic of moral and fitness promotion. Boosterthon does not care about the long term effects their high pressure tactics and deception has on very young minds. I can't believe how many people are actually buying into this. WAKE UP!
ravia

Lexington, KY

#16 Apr 14, 2011
Like if you have your all prizes in fun run.com . Do you guys give us prizes at glendover elementary school?please give me a answer now.
okaythen

Winder, GA

#17 Nov 1, 2011
The Boosterthon came to my school just today, and it was great. Yes, the prizes are not worth the pledge amount, and at first I was thinking 'What's the point? I could buy a lot more useful stuff with that pledge money.'
But then my teacher explained that the money goes to the school, so it's not really about the prizes. She said they hand out the prizes to us during UBT (recess).
My school has only 4th, 5th, and 6th grade though.
VERY Concerned Teacher

Herndon, VA

#18 Jun 8, 2012
jcfather wrote:
Boosterthon is great! I believe a lot of you parents who don't like probably never got to actually see them in the classroom. I don't know how you can judge them based on what you hear.
They don't "push" pledges.
They actually get taught cool character traits and coming from the boosterthon guys, good role models, it actually means something.
These guys are not in it for the money.
Wake up before you start criticizing. Visit a classroom.
see my post below...I'm a teacher and I'm witnessing it first hand. It's VERY concerning!!
aonomus

Melbourne, FL

#20 Oct 6, 2012
SARA wrote:
Please reply,I am without a job,If i can't raise money for Boosterthon,Do i have to pay from my pocket.
no u do not
whatever your kids say about needing pledges dont listen they dont need it
Worried Mom

Palm Beach Gardens, FL

#21 Nov 25, 2012
we started a petition against Boosterthon...if you are against their tactics as well, please sign and leave comments...our PTO is not listening
http://www.change.org/petitions/boosterthon-f...
Vlada

Pompano Beach, FL

#22 Feb 6, 2013
you click "see my (#) pledges", and a list should pop up. klick edit on the pledges and choose delete pledge then write delete pledge.

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