Willimantic Police Target Drug Dealers

Police are stepping up enforcement of drug laws, arresting eight people in the last two weeks. Full Story
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Whatever

United States

#44 Mar 17, 2008
timemachinist wrote:
<quoted text>
Well Sally I'm sure the opponents of slavery also felt ground down sometimes but historical change doesn't come overnight, it takes time for people to see the alternatives to the only state of affairs they know. There is actually a growing awareness of the failure of drug prohibition, a grwoing sense that regulation will be better than a black market, that a public health approach will be better than the disaster of a criminalizing approach to drugs.
<quoted text>
Well Good Morning to my Indiana Stalker, glad to see you're still with me, following me from thread to thread with ad hominems and name-calling. You show how devoid of ideas and reasoning the drug warriors really are! For that I thank you. But let me know if you're ever ready for an actual policy discussion without name-calling. I'll be ready.
You're always ready, you sit around all day, every day and obsess about the legalization of drugs so that if someday your dream would come true you could run right out and buy/sell some without more fear than you already have. You are paranoid, dillusional and show classic signs of schizophrenia. Instead of babbling about govt. conspiracies and how rightous your BS is, how about putting the needle down, toss the stash, have a glass of fruit juice instead of your other "juice" and live a day enjoying the fact you can take a breath that doesn't get you wasted. Get yourself some mental help and take care of your kid before child services does.

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#45 Mar 17, 2008
Ending drug prohibition means bringing the drug market under legal regulation, thereby improving public health and safety. It will take the manufacture and distribution of drugs away from organized crime and street-dealing youths, and channel it through legally-regulated, age-restricted stores or dispensaries where counseling and advice are always available.

I propose a range of drug consumer licenses, akin to a driver's license, boater's license, or handgun license. The closest comparison would be the doctor's prescription, which amounts to a license to purchase a drug, and basically certifies that the consumer has been advised as to safest use practice for the drug.

Licenses would be best issued like a prescription, except by local agencies or consumer unions for each class of drug. These consumer unions can offer a standard education curriculum for that particular class of drug, detailing the hazards and recommending safest use practices. Such curriculum should be drawn up by a board including physicians and other "experts" invited to join the consumer union board of directors, as well as consumer representatives for that particular drug. The consumer reps would make sure that the curriculum acknowledges real-life conditions under which the drug is taken.

Although I argue for a separation of medical from recreational drug systems in the sense that medical treatments remain on the prescription system while recreational be sold to any licensed adult having undergone an education specific to the drug, in actually delineating these categories there would be a lot of grey area as some people wished to take medical drugs for non-medical reasons, examples such as Oxycontin and Vicodin. These grey areas could be resolved for certain categories of drugs (like the opiates) by making different forms available depending on whether it was intended for medical or recreational use; ie, heroin or smokable opium through the recreational license and Oxy and Vicodin through the medical prescription. Much prescription drug misuse and the resultant dangers could be eliminated by legalizing formulations more appropriate for recreational use, heroin v. Oxycontin being an example.

By eliminating the vagaries of unregulated drugs in an unregulated market, accidental poisonings and overdoses would be virtually eliminated, as would the street crime and organized crime and corruption of the black market. Then those with drug problems could be seen as people who need help rather than as criminals. Then law enforcement and courts could concentrate on REAL crime while drugs could be dealth with much more effectively through a publ;ic health approach.
Whatever wrote:
<quoted text>
You're always ready, you sit around all day, every day and obsess about the legalization of drugs so that if someday your dream would come true you could run right out and buy/sell some without more fear than you already have. You are paranoid, dillusional and show classic signs of schizophrenia. Instead of babbling about govt. conspiracies and how rightous your BS is, how about putting the needle down, toss the stash, have a glass of fruit juice instead of your other "juice" and live a day enjoying the fact you can take a breath that doesn't get you wasted. Get yourself some mental help and take care of your kid before child services does.
Stalking someone on-line is obsessive behavior. You follow me from thread to thread, making baseless slander while avoiding any policy discussion. Debating you is like debating a 12-yo kid. You don't write about the thread topic, you write about me. Why is that?
Lenny Bruce

Avon, CT

#46 Mar 17, 2008
timemachinist wrote:
Ending drug prohibition means bringing the drug market under legal regulation, thereby improving public health and safety. It will take the manufacture and distribution of drugs away from organized crime and street-dealing youths, and channel it through legally-regulated, age-restricted stores or dispensaries where counseling and advice are always available.
I propose a range of drug consumer licenses, akin to a driver's license, boater's license, or handgun license. The closest comparison would be the doctor's prescription, which amounts to a license to purchase a drug, and basically certifies that the consumer has been advised as to safest use practice for the drug.
Licenses would be best issued like a prescription, except by local agencies or consumer unions for each class of drug. These consumer unions can offer a standard education curriculum for that particular class of drug, detailing the hazards and recommending safest use practices. Such curriculum should be drawn up by a board including physicians and other "experts" invited to join the consumer union board of directors, as well as consumer representatives for that particular drug. The consumer reps would make sure that the curriculum acknowledges real-life conditions under which the drug is taken.
Although I argue for a separation of medical from recreational drug systems in the sense that medical treatments remain on the prescription system while recreational be sold to any licensed adult having undergone an education specific to the drug, in actually delineating these categories there would be a lot of grey area as some people wished to take medical drugs for non-medical reasons, examples such as Oxycontin and Vicodin. These grey areas could be resolved for certain categories of drugs (like the opiates) by making different forms available depending on whether it was intended for medical or recreational use; ie, heroin or smokable opium through the recreational license and Oxy and Vicodin through the medical prescription. Much prescription drug misuse and the resultant dangers could be eliminated by legalizing formulations more appropriate for recreational use, heroin v. Oxycontin being an example.
By eliminating the vagaries of unregulated drugs in an unregulated market, accidental poisonings and overdoses would be virtually eliminated, as would the street crime and organized crime and corruption of the black market. Then those with drug problems could be seen as people who need help rather than as criminals. Then law enforcement and courts could concentrate on REAL crime while drugs could be dealth with much more effectively through a publ;ic health approach.
<quoted text>
Stalking someone on-line is obsessive behavior. You follow me from thread to thread, making baseless slander while avoiding any policy discussion. Debating you is like debating a 12-yo kid. You don't write about the thread topic, you write about me. Why is that?
Broken record. Skip, skip, skip, skip
WTF

Avon, CT

#47 Mar 17, 2008
Whatever wrote:
<quoted text>
You're always ready, you sit around all day, every day and obsess about the legalization of drugs so that if someday your dream would come true you could run right out and buy/sell some without more fear than you already have. You are paranoid, dillusional and show classic signs of schizophrenia. Instead of babbling about govt. conspiracies and how rightous your BS is, how about putting the needle down, toss the stash, have a glass of fruit juice instead of your other "juice" and live a day enjoying the fact you can take a breath that doesn't get you wasted. Get yourself some mental help and take care of your kid before child services does.
Ah, you're also well aquainted with Mr. Legalize Heroin, I see. Don't know about you, but I don't want legally effed-up people around me all day and night. How many people that you know are nicer, more fun and more productive members of society when they're high? Most of the ones I know turn into complete idiots when under the influence.
WTF

Avon, CT

#48 Mar 17, 2008
timemachinist wrote:
<quoted text>
Stalking someone on-line is obsessive behavior. You follow me from thread to thread, making baseless slander while avoiding any policy discussion. Debating you is like debating a 12-yo kid. You don't write about the thread topic, you write about me. Why is that?
You don't think your repeated intrusions into any and all drug related threads with the same crap over and over ISN'T obsessive? And do you think maybe people wouldn't be on your case if your weren't obsessive? And how about giving some credit to whomever you stole the stuff you write? It's obvious you commited plagiarism. Was it Friedman?

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#50 Mar 17, 2008
Here's a little more for "justice" who posted above about the comparison of drug war with Nazi justiz:

Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State

http://www.amazon.com/Drug-Warriors-Their-Pre...

EXCERPT from Library Journal review:

Drawing on his latest book, Nazi Justiz (Praeger, 1995), he makes an extended analogy between Germany repressing the Jews and America repressing drug users. In chapters on identification, ostracism, confiscation, concentration, and annihilation, he shows that democracy, privacy, and family life can be lost in our society just as they were when these policies were applied to the Jews. Because of "bureaucratic thrust," the criminalization aimed at one group consumes the entire society. In contrast, Miller thinks drug use is normal and should be regarded as such; he marshals convincing evidence that it can be mature and responsible. If drugs are abused, he does not think criminalization or medical force are solutions, any more than they would be solutions to unemployment....

END EXCERPT

I read this book about 8 years ago. He makes a strong case that the American drug war "justice" system has many parallels to Nazi "justiz." A real eye-opener for people who think this country is based on freedom. It is only freedom for those who conform to mainstream culture: if you like alcohol, tobacco, Viagra, Prosac, Xanax, Ritalin, etc. But if you have a different "unapproved" preference, you are criminal, a target for home invasion by aggressive violent police who take you to violent disease-ridden degrading prisons and forced "re-education" in state-funded "rehabilitation centers." Its not a war on drugs, its war on people, akin to the use of secret police and psychiatric "hospitals" by the Soviet regime against political and cultural dissenters. My friendly Indiana Stalker (follows me from thread to thread, he's followed me to this one too) is just the kind of bootlicking psychiatrist the Soviets would have employed for this kind of work:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psikhushka

EXCERPT

The official Soviet psychiatry allegedly abused the diagnosis of sluggishly progressing schizophrenia (????????? a special form of the illness that supposedly affects only the person's social behavior, with no trace of other traits: "most frequently, ideas about a struggle for truth and justice are formed by personalities with a paranoid structure," according to the Moscow Serbsky Institute professors (a quote [4] from Vladimir Bukovsky's archives).

END EXCERPT
WTF wrote:
You don't think your repeated intrusions into any and all drug related threads with the same crap over and over ISN'T obsessive? And do you think maybe people wouldn't be on your case if your weren't obsessive? And how about giving some credit to whomever you stole the stuff you write? It's obvious you commited plagiarism. Was it Friedman?
How is it intrusive to post on-topic critique of the law that is the topic of the thread? If I attract the ire of a few mud-throwing opponents who can't make a reasoned case for their position, that is no reflection on me but rather on them. As for the plagiarism accusation, I do cite my sources with links and EXCERPT ... END EXCERPT denotations. The rest is mine, I suppose I should thank you for the flattery of your mistaking it for the published works of an eminent professor. If anyone is being "intrusive," it is the Indiana Stalker who follows me here not to discuss the article or the law behind it, but rather to hurl insults at me. Perhaps you can explain why you prefer to try to make this a discussion about me rather than about how "Willimantic Police Target Drug Dealers?"

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#51 Mar 17, 2008
test
Whatever

United States

#52 Mar 17, 2008
timemachinist wrote:
Here's a little more for "justice" who posted above about the comparison of drug war with Nazi justiz:...
Oh, now it is "Nazi-ism" - ROTFLMAO! I think it is impossible for you to even breath the air without some kind of conspiracy theory brewing in your brain. You are such a mental case!!!

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#53 Mar 17, 2008
Whatever wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh, now it is "Nazi-ism" - ROTFLMAO! I think it is impossible for you to even breath the air without some kind of conspiracy theory brewing in your brain. You are such a mental case!!!
I want to formally welcome my Indiana Stalker to this thread, he follows me from thread to thread to attack my character without addressing any of the facts I bring to the discussion.

The hypocrisy of the "drug war" persecuting people for certain drugs while more dangerous (and legal) drugs are saturating society and the drug warriors themselves...I guess some bootlickers think we're supposed to ignore this and just call names at the people who point it out.

The United States has become a gulag nation, imprisoning more people for drugs than all of western Europe --with a larger population-- imprisons for all offenses combined. Already 5 years ago Human Rights Watch pointed out how the drug war led the USA to imprison a higher percentage of its population than any other country on earth:

http://www.hrw.org/backgrounder/usa/incarcera...

EXCERPT:

The country that holds itself out as the "land of freedom" incarcerates a higher percentage of its people than any other country. The human costs wasted lives, wrecked families, troubled children are incalculable, as are the adverse social, economic and political consequences of weakened communities, diminished opportunities for economic mobility, and extensive disenfranchisement....

...Perhaps the single greatest force behind the growth of the prison population has been the national "war on drugs." The number of incarcerated drug offenders has increased twelvefold since 1980....

END EXCERPT

Rather than answer critiques of the laws and thought responsible for this hypocritical travesty of justice, the partisans of this culture war prefer to hurl ad hominems. Anybody with even a slight acquaintence with debate recognizes ad hominems (character attacks) as tacit admission that the attackers have no factual case to make in support of their position.

If public health and public safety were genuinely the goal of drug policy, then we'd see the prohibited drugs removedf from the black market by placing their commerce under legal regulation. Just as repeal of alcohol prohibition undermined the organized crime cartels controlling the bootleg industry, so too would licensed dispensaries eliminate the wholesale cartels and streetgang retailers. Then a vast amount of organized crime and street crime would be eliminated, accidental poisonings and overdoses from unregulated drugs would be virtually eliminated, and we'd be able to treat the remaining drug problems as a public health issue rather than a criminal issue.

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#55 Mar 18, 2008
whatever wrote:
the only hypocrisy of the drug war is that you continue to post to topix while it is apparant that you are probably more in favor of legalizing drugs than most (even heroin). Beyond the fact you have serious mental issues, I would also guess you have serious drug problems too. Most that read your posts can see that. The rest is just BS babble dribble blah, blah, blah!!
Good Morning, my Indiana Stalker, I see you are true to form again today: ducking a policy argument in favor of character attacks, showing you have no facts or reasoning behind your position, only prejudice, malice and hate. That must feel terrible, I hope someday you'll find some peace.

Since: May 08

Aptos, CA

#56 May 8, 2008
ricbee

Shelton, CT

#57 May 8, 2008
Suspicious cars wrote:
The article says that "Officers have been serving warrants and pulling over suspicious cars since Feb. 15." Good, I'm glad they are serving warrnats but I thought that the cops had to have a reason to pull over a car (motor vehicle violation, light out illegally etc). Sounds like the cops don't play by the rules or the reporter did not do a good job of explaining what is happening. I hope it is the latter.
Funny you happen to mention the 4th Amendment which is completely ignored on a regular basis every time the cops decide to set up one of their "checkpoints". There was one Wednesday evening at 10:00 on Main St in front of City Hall in Hartford. That's the way to get people to come to town. What a waste of manpower & a violation of civil rights.
joe

United States

#58 Feb 17, 2009
I'm in accord with timemachinist. Prohibition was a failure with alcohol just as surely as it is a failure with "drugs." They need to be regulated, not banned. This makes sense, since a person's individual freedoms should not be infringed if they do not directly affect others, and we can spend less money on enforcement and imprisonment, with all of the alienation and strain that puts on our society.
And then there's the cash from taxing it. We could pay for every single druggie to have free rehab with the proceeds. Not to mention putting the gangs out of business.
Anyway, I'll say this about Willi, I've certainly seen lots of drugs, and lots of people wandering around clearly zonked, but I haven't seen a whole lot of violence. As a matter of fact, I've never seen any, only heard of a few incidents. Even given the population difference, when you compare that to Hartford, Bridgeport, or even New Haven, Willi starts looking pretty good.
johnny blanco

United States

#59 Oct 3, 2009
Here wrote:
<quoted text>
Homeless yet you have a computer plenty of time to write endless dribble regarding most articles in the Courant. Shouldn't you be reading and commenting on the articles in the Reformer or Eagle Times? Get a life.
Regarding Willi... It's a pit. The End.
there are more drugs and crime in a smaller city in pa called Reading. willimantic sounds nice. my wife are leaving reading in dec after 5 years in prison for drugs. we planned to go to miami. forget that, willimatic, here we come. i guess we will be welcome.
King James

Middletown, CT

#60 Nov 16, 2009
Keep up the good work Willimantic PD, good luck and God bless
King James

Middletown, CT

#61 Nov 16, 2009
Willimantic PD- rock their houses!!!
Rain King

Leominster, MA

#62 May 12, 2013
Willi Drugs wrote:
Willimantic, is by far, the most drug infested town in the Northeastern CT. It rivals Hartford in a quest for the drug lands home. NETA gang members (Originally from PR prisons) are every where in Willimantic. As a former resident, I can assure you that there is nothing "Romantic" about little ole "Willimantic".
To add to their dilemna, over the past two decades; they have permitted an overwhelming and all consuming growth in social service agencies. Which, in turn, calls in even more drug dealers, ex-convicts and criminals into the town to attend "court mandated programming". With a relapse rate higher than anyone could ever inamgine AND Heroin and crack being readily available via NETA on the Willimantic streets: Crime runs rampant in the various pockets of chaose in the city.
God bless the officers in their attempt to clean up the streets but until the runners that 'hide out" in Willimantic are caught (and who HAPPEN to deliver to UCONN, Hartford, etc...), the problem will remain!
until u get all the puerto ricans out, the problem will always remain. end of story.
Gilby

Bolton, CT

#63 Dec 17, 2013
I lived there for the first half of my life and I am still frequently over there all around town and all I see are the cops eating donuts under a tree and across the street a guy selling cheap crack then down the road a prostitute on the street corner. The cop just sits there seeing this shot and he just keeps eating the damn donut

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