Willimantic Police Target Drug Dealers

Willimantic Police Target Drug Dealers

There are 58 comments on the Hartford Courant story from Feb 29, 2008, titled Willimantic Police Target Drug Dealers. In it, Hartford Courant reports that:

Police are stepping up enforcement of drug laws, arresting eight people in the last two weeks.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hartford Courant.

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Willi Drugs

Willimantic, CT

#2 Feb 29, 2008
Willimantic, is by far, the most drug infested town in the Northeastern CT. It rivals Hartford in a quest for the drug lands home. NETA gang members (Originally from PR prisons) are every where in Willimantic. As a former resident, I can assure you that there is nothing "Romantic" about little ole "Willimantic".

To add to their dilemna, over the past two decades; they have permitted an overwhelming and all consuming growth in social service agencies. Which, in turn, calls in even more drug dealers, ex-convicts and criminals into the town to attend "court mandated programming". With a relapse rate higher than anyone could ever inamgine AND Heroin and crack being readily available via NETA on the Willimantic streets: Crime runs rampant in the various pockets of chaose in the city.

God bless the officers in their attempt to clean up the streets but until the runners that 'hide out" in Willimantic are caught (and who HAPPEN to deliver to UCONN, Hartford, etc...), the problem will remain!
Mike from Hartford

Newington, CT

#3 Feb 29, 2008
Willi Drugs wrote:
Willimantic, is by far, the most drug infested town in the Northeastern CT. It rivals Hartford in a quest for the drug lands home. NETA gang members (Originally from PR prisons) are every where in Willimantic. As a former resident, I can assure you that there is nothing "Romantic" about little ole "Willimantic".
To add to their dilemna, over the past two decades; they have permitted an overwhelming and all consuming growth in social service agencies. Which, in turn, calls in even more drug dealers, ex-convicts and criminals into the town to attend "court mandated programming". With a relapse rate higher than anyone could ever inamgine AND Heroin and crack being readily available via NETA on the Willimantic streets: Crime runs rampant in the various pockets of chaose in the city.
God bless the officers in their attempt to clean up the streets but until the runners that 'hide out" in Willimantic are caught (and who HAPPEN to deliver to UCONN, Hartford, etc...), the problem will remain!
Actually, it is worse than Hartford
Steve Real

Willimantic, CT

#4 Feb 29, 2008
It's a funny war.

Connecticut spends more money
on incarsurating non voilent drug offenders then on higher education.

Shame on you!

I'm in Willimantic all the time because I live here too.

And everybody that I know
believes it's phony war
for by you socialists!
You socialists on the right
and the left are control freaks.
Get an education you hillbillies
and grow up.

This ain't the 1980's anymore.

The War on drugs is a war on people.

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#6 Feb 29, 2008
Willi Drugs wrote:
Willimantic, is by far, the most drug infested town in the Northeastern CT. It rivals Hartford in a quest for the drug lands home. NETA gang members (Originally from PR prisons) are every where in Willimantic. As a former resident, I can assure you that there is nothing "Romantic" about little ole "Willimantic".
To add to their dilemna, over the past two decades; they have permitted an overwhelming and all consuming growth in social service agencies. Which, in turn, calls in even more drug dealers, ex-convicts and criminals into the town to attend "court mandated programming". With a relapse rate higher than anyone could ever inamgine AND Heroin and crack being readily available via NETA on the Willimantic streets: Crime runs rampant in the various pockets of chaose in the city.
God bless the officers in their attempt to clean up the streets but until the runners that 'hide out" in Willimantic are caught (and who HAPPEN to deliver to UCONN, Hartford, etc...), the problem will remain!
An excellent description of the inevitable results of prohibition.
OIO

Belleville, MI

#7 Feb 29, 2008
timemachinist wrote:
<quoted text>
An excellent description of the inevitable results of prohibition.
You would love it in willimantic.

Seems like you need a good hobby.

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#8 Feb 29, 2008
I lived in Willimantic for some years while a student at UCONN. I love that town, though I haven't been there in awhile. Lot's of friendly people, great bookstore cafe (Everyday Books), the Victorian Lady was a great hangout, the big old houses have history and charm, as do the old thread mills. Everything was there: 2 universities, great restaurants, a great dance club (can't remember the name, but it was pretty large with great live music), a cinema, lots of stores on Main Street, great architecture, an antiques auction, lots of musicians, affordable housing, diverse population. Yeah, I loved that town.
Dave Smith

United States

#9 Feb 29, 2008
It's a funny war.

Connecticut spends more money
on incarsurating non voilent drug offenders then on higher education.

Shame on you!

I'm in Willimantic all the time because I live here too.

And everybody that I know
believes it's phony war
for by you socialists!
You socialists on the right
and the left are control freaks.
Get an education you hillbillies
and grow up.

This ain't the 1980's anymore.

The War on drugs is a war on people.

Sounds like you need to go to prison to get your education.

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#10 Feb 29, 2008
Oh yeah, I forgot to mention the beautiful topography of hilly Willy....
Dave Smith wrote:
It's a funny war.
Connecticut spends more money
on incarsurating non voilent drug offenders then on higher education.
Shame on you!
I'm in Willimantic all the time because I live here too.
And everybody that I know
believes it's phony war
for by you socialists!
You socialists on the right
and the left are control freaks.
Get an education you hillbillies
and grow up.
This ain't the 1980's anymore.
The War on drugs is a war on people.
Sounds like you need to go to prison to get your education.
ECHO...

ECHo...

ECho...

Echo...

echo....
Angry Mom

Greenfield, MA

#11 Feb 29, 2008
It has lessened since the new police chief has been there. She is doing a great job. But, the place is filled with drugs and it is no easy task to get rid of them. It took a long time to get so dirty and it will take a long time to clean it up.
WhoLeo

United States

#12 Feb 29, 2008
I live in Willimantic and it is not just in this town, yes the dealers and the drugs are here thanks in terms to the many programs we offer.
But, if you do read the newspapers, a good portion of this people getting arrested come from the surrounding towns. Funny, no one ever mentions this fact.
tootrue

New Haven, CT

#13 Feb 29, 2008
So they're going to close all of the saloons and arrest the alcohol drinkers? All of these cops will probably go to a bar to celebrate the latest "drug war" victory...
Suspicious cars

Storrs Mansfield, CT

#14 Feb 29, 2008
The article says that "Officers have been serving warrants and pulling over suspicious cars since Feb. 15." Good, I'm glad they are serving warrnats but I thought that the cops had to have a reason to pull over a car (motor vehicle violation, light out illegally etc). Sounds like the cops don't play by the rules or the reporter did not do a good job of explaining what is happening. I hope it is the latter.
Willi Drugs

Willimantic, CT

#15 Feb 29, 2008
Dave Smith wrote:
It's a funny war.
Connecticut spends more money
on incarsurating non voilent drug offenders then on higher education.
Shame on you!
I'm in Willimantic all the time because I live here too.
And everybody that I know
believes it's phony war
for by you socialists!
You socialists on the right
and the left are control freaks.
Get an education you hillbillies
and grow up.
This ain't the 1980's anymore.
The War on drugs is a war on people.
Sounds like you need to go to prison to get your education.
Yes, an education could indeed go a long way. In fact, this is evidenced by your choice of spelling for the word "incarcerated". In your case, funding for education would be of paramount concern should I have been your father.

"War on the people" is also a phrase typically chosen by “would-be” anarchist who wish to have the rules made by AND governing our society changed so that they may continue their unacceptable and illegal behaviors. Case in point – drug abusers and dealers.

Should these wards of the state ( gang members, drug addicts, inmates, etc…) decide they would like to "tune in" and "drop out" of society (Leary reference – late 1960’s – early 1970’s) with their insatiable hunger for mind altering substances, then by all means, let them!
Gather them all up and place them in alternative housing that is secured so they can’t interact with the rest of society. Let them govern themselves, feed themselves and see if they can – ib fact – develop a viable, thriving society to compete with the rest of the country and the world. We – those that have long become tired of these people strain on our economy and their tearing of our social fabric - simply shouldn't be forced to fit the bill any longer.... They will be isolated from stealing from us further. We will no longer pay for them and society can hum along without the burden of what would have otherwise – in the past (pre-1950’s)– been dealt with in a much more direct and severe manner. A sort of “Social Darwinism”, if you would.

Hillbilly - by the way - refers to those Indigenous to the Appalachian mountain region of the United States. More specifically, those living within the Tennessee Valley, West Virginia and Kentucky areas of the Mid-Atlantic South.
Perhaps, being a Connecticut resident, you would be better served selecting the term "swamp Yankee" instead?

While you are busy selecting reading material to study your "war on the people", perhaps a good book on English grammar and American History could provide you with the basic educational requirement to further your quest?
Willi Drugs

Willimantic, CT

#16 Feb 29, 2008
WhoLeo wrote:
I live in Willimantic and it is not just in this town, yes the dealers and the drugs are here thanks in terms to the many programs we offer.
But, if you do read the newspapers, a good portion of this people getting arrested come from the surrounding towns. Funny, no one ever mentions this fact.
If you were to speak to the Police Officers and even those arrested, those that you read about coming from other towns - they are migrating out of Willimantic and into the low income housing areas of Ashford, Chaplin, Wondham, etc... in an effort to AVOID arrest while still being close enough to downtown Willi to ply their trade!

GThey recently found a suspect - suspected of murder - living "quietly" in a large apartment complex on the Southeatern side of Ashford who elected to move their to avoid those officers that recognized him so readily.
Willi Drugs

Willimantic, CT

#17 Feb 29, 2008
Suspicious cars wrote:
The article says that "Officers have been serving warrants and pulling over suspicious cars since Feb. 15." Good, I'm glad they are serving warrnats but I thought that the cops had to have a reason to pull over a car (motor vehicle violation, light out illegally etc). Sounds like the cops don't play by the rules or the reporter did not do a good job of explaining what is happening. I hope it is the latter.
Again, you are right. There is a need for probable cause. Interestingly enough however, many in the Willimantic area are fully aware of the connection of those in the "Willimantic Car Club" and the PR Prison gang, NETA's.

Just as you see gang members on television flash their gang signs using their hands - in a effort to obtain recognition my their fellow gang members - many suspect the car club logo on the little Honda's and Toyota's is a similar gang affiliation.

Gang symbols - which mark gang territory and reflect membership - are always changing in an effort to allude detection by authorities. They have just simply chosen a "mobile" means of identification in this case.
Willi Drugs

Willimantic, CT

#18 Feb 29, 2008
timemachinist wrote:
<quoted text>
An excellent description of the inevitable results of prohibition.
Thank you - but I was actually using this to describe the social and interpersonal decay of the area involved to demonstrate the lacl of personal responsibility as well as lack of respect for mutually agreed upon social order.......
Here

Harwinton, CT

#19 Feb 29, 2008
Steven_G_Erickson wrote:
I get to freeze, homeless out in the woods in Vermont.
Homeless yet you have a computer plenty of time to write endless dribble regarding most articles in the Courant. Shouldn't you be reading and commenting on the articles in the Reformer or Eagle Times? Get a life.

Regarding Willi... It's a pit. The End.
Bob

Newington, CT

#20 Feb 29, 2008
Willi Drugs wrote:
<quoted text>
...
GThey recently found a suspect - suspected of murder -...
perhaps you need a good book on English spelling... GTHEY (sp?)... we can't all be professors professor

“Fallen Angel”

Since: Jan 07

New England

#21 Feb 29, 2008
Willi Drugs wrote:
<quoted text>
Thank you - but I was actually using this to describe the social and interpersonal decay of the area involved to demonstrate the lacl of personal responsibility as well as lack of respect for mutually agreed upon social order.......
If there is a lack of respect for the order then by definition it is not "mutually agreed upon" but rather imposed. And of course prohibition laws are the opposite of personal responsibility, they are totalitarian attempts to make life decisions for the population, according to standards that are hypocritical and with methods that are sadistic. By this I mean the powerful people keep their own vices under legal regulation while criminalizing the vices of minority subcultures (not necessarily racial, but cultural minorities, in this case being of a different drug culture than the whiskey-drinking, cigar-smoking, Prosac-popping, Viagra-enjoying majority drug subculture). Sadistic in the sense of denying any legal regulation to the minority drug market, maximizing the dangers of the drugs and the trade, and then tearing those people from their families and careers in order to put them in violent, degrading, disease-ridden prisons.

The way to eliminate street dealers and mafia wholesalers and all the crime associated with such, and to virtually eliminate accidental poisonings and overdoses, would be to replace prohibition with a legally-regulated market wherein licensed (ie, educated) consumers would purchase their regullated (ie, known doseages and purities, clearly labeled) drugs from licensed (ie, with more to lose than gain from selling to minors) dealers in places where counseling or treatment referals are always discretely and respectfully available on request.

After all, the supermarkets selling beer and cigarettes, the convenience stores selling cigars, the liquor stores selling Vodka, the pharmacies selling Viagra --these are all recreational drugs being sold without the crime and adulterations and criminal stigma, and society and individuals would only be worse off if these drugs were prohibited, just as society and individuals will be better off when these illegal drugs are finally placed under legal regulation.
EX Waterbury Resident

East Hartford, CT

#22 Feb 29, 2008
Willi Drugs wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, an education could indeed go a long way. In fact, this is evidenced by your choice of spelling for the word "incarcerated". In your case, funding for education would be of paramount concern should I have been your father.
"War on the people" is also a phrase typically chosen by “would-be” anarchist who wish to have the rules made by AND governing our society changed so that they may continue their unacceptable and illegal behaviors. Case in point – drug abusers and dealers.
Should these wards of the state ( gang members, drug addicts, inmates, etc…) decide they would like to "tune in" and "drop out" of society (Leary reference – late 1960’s – early 1970’s) with their insatiable hunger for mind altering substances, then by all means, let them!
Gather them all up and place them in alternative housing that is secured so they can’t interact with the rest of society. Let them govern themselves, feed themselves and see if they can – ib fact – develop a viable, thriving society to compete with the rest of the country and the world. We – those that have long become tired of these people strain on our economy and their tearing of our social fabric - simply shouldn't be forced to fit the bill any longer.... They will be isolated from stealing from us further. We will no longer pay for them and society can hum along without the burden of what would have otherwise – in the past (pre-1950’s)– been dealt with in a much more direct and severe manner. A sort of “Social Darwinism”, if you would.
Hillbilly - by the way - refers to those Indigenous to the Appalachian mountain region of the United States. More specifically, those living within the Tennessee Valley, West Virginia and Kentucky areas of the Mid-Atlantic South.
Perhaps, being a Connecticut resident, you would be better served selecting the term "swamp Yankee" instead?
While you are busy selecting reading material to study your "war on the people", perhaps a good book on English grammar and American History could provide you with the basic educational requirement to further your quest?
An excellent response but unfortunately he won't understand what you're saying so I'll be it into words he can understand, he's an idiot.

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