Helping the poor in Guatemala

Helping the poor in Guatemala

There are 16 comments on the Sioux County Index/STPNS story from Feb 6, 2007, titled Helping the poor in Guatemala. In it, Sioux County Index/STPNS reports that:

Spending two weeks on a mission trip in a rural area of a very poor country 'was the right thing to do' for Glenda DeKoster.  She hopes that somehow she helped improve the lives, body and soul, of the ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Sioux County Index/STPNS.

luis from california

Los Angeles, CA

#1 Feb 7, 2007
It was really interesnting and thoughtful of your doctors and nurses to help the people of Guatemala. Thank you for caring for the poor.
lorenmollner

Jackson, CA

#2 Feb 10, 2007
I just adopted a baby girl from Mazatenango Guatemala where the group in your article went to help. I would love to be in touch.
Loren Mollner, [email protected]
Jay

Bay Minette, AL

#3 Feb 14, 2007
Thats great that you guys were able to bring people help for those 2 weeks. But what happens after you leave?

Also - isn't it unethical to promote/impose your religious views by attaching it to life-saving medical care?

I'm all about volunteering - but I think it should be done with respect to the people you're helping's culture and relgion and beliefs. I think you end up violating their rights by influencing a vulnerable population with health services and such.
Second Thoughts

Victorville, CA

#4 Feb 15, 2007
Jay wrote:
Thats great that you guys were able to bring people help for those 2 weeks. But what happens after you leave?
Also - isn't it unethical to promote/impose your religious views by attaching it to life-saving medical care?
I'm all about volunteering - but I think it should be done with respect to the people you're helping's culture and relgion and beliefs. I think you end up violating their rights by influencing a vulnerable population with health services and such.
I agree, maybe we should let them all die in the name of respecting their beliefs. God forbid we should impose our belief of helping them.
loren mollner

Portland, OR

#5 Mar 20, 2007
Jay wrote:
Thats great that you guys were able to bring people help for those 2 weeks. But what happens after you leave?
Also - isn't it unethical to promote/impose your religious views by attaching it to life-saving medical care?
I'm all about volunteering - but I think it should be done with respect to the people you're helping's culture and relgion and beliefs. I think you end up violating their rights by influencing a vulnerable population with health services and such.
Jay, you are right. Stay home and watch spongebob.
Vince

Minneapolis, MN

#6 Apr 1, 2007
No strings attached aid (medical in particular) is humanitarian, but if it comes with an agenda based on "saving" people to a form of Christian fundamentalism, then the aid is not genuine and is disrespectful of the autonomy and beauty of the indigenous peoples. It's not about staying home and watching television, it's about raising your voice in protest when Americans try to export their beliefs onto other people, which is arrogant.
Carlos Castellanos

Scarborough, Australia

#7 Apr 10, 2007
Vince, completely agree with your views. Agendas like this based on "saving" people are the kind of agendas that have created such distrust towards US people all across latin america. As a Guatemalan every time I see help comming from the US I can no longer avoid thinking what are they taking in exchange and normaly is a lot more that what they give... Bit sad.
jason baca

United States

#8 Apr 18, 2007
Vince, Carlos, Seems like you have some psychological issues against christianity.. I am chrisian, working with poor coffee farmers, I do not evangelize, but when I get to know them, they want to know why I am hear helping them in this desolate place..
God, simply enough, sent me, I am working on economic development, but then they want God, Motivation, and Reasons to help others unselfishly, not for self-gain, but the the gain of the people, I will show them how God wants them out of poverty, just like I do....
The suicide in Virginia, is because he didnt have God, if our society(USA) goes down hill, its because were losing God and not doing it ourselves...
Guatemala is a rich country now, with very happy poor people... Because they have God and peace in their heart.
patty

Somerset, NJ

#9 Dec 1, 2008
lorenmollner wrote:
I just adopted a baby girl from Mazatenango Guatemala where the group in your article went to help. I would love to be in touch.
Loren Mollner, [email protected]
I also adopted 2 sons from Guatemala. My oldest was born in Mazatenango. I would love to be in touch and see how all is going.
patty
Robert Bruce Banner

New York, NY

#10 Dec 1, 2008
jason baca wrote:
Vince, Carlos, Seems like you have some psychological issues against christianity.. I am chrisian, working with poor coffee farmers, I do not evangelize, but when I get to know them, they want to know why I am hear helping them in this desolate place..
God, simply enough, sent me, I am working on economic development, but then they want God, Motivation, and Reasons to help others unselfishly, not for self-gain, but the the gain of the people, I will show them how God wants them out of poverty, just like I do....
The suicide in Virginia, is because he didnt have God, if our society(USA) goes down hill, its because were losing God and not doing it ourselves...
Guatemala is a rich country now, with very happy poor people... Because they have God and peace in their heart.
Jason, your religious views are border line scary. I hope you realize the irony in what you've said. The main issues we face, not only as a nation, but as a planet stem from people who are fundamentalist, like you. People, who like you, blame every bad thing on lack of God and believe all good comes from God. This is really no different than then views of radical Islamist.

“Tin Foil Hat applied to lower ”

Since: Jul 08

Allegeny

#11 Dec 1, 2008
This is not a religious post , even that you have a viable point BRB. If God was to come down to Earth I would expect him to say "WTF are you doing wondering about me for? and not your planet and people" Second if there is a such all mighty God why do people look to "him" for answers? Maybe this is not his department. either rate if it is, he should have been out on his high exhaustive ass long ago for mismanagement. The one true GOD that rules this planet is the controller of GUNS/GOLD OIL and DRUGS.
megan vincent uk

Grimsby, UK

#12 Jan 22, 2009
yeh wotev
Frank

United States

#13 Feb 13, 2009
As you see those who abused others suffer in their last years you will come to realize that there is a God. A God which has no name but is the fulfillment of the cycle of life. If a person does good to other don't question is intention for perhaps God is using him for his purpose. Carma
Beaver Brownlee

Elkhorn, NE

#14 Feb 14, 2009
I do not believe in any sort of god at all. I do believe in helping others. I do believe in adoption, but I believe there is probably a child close to you NOT from another country that needs to be adopted first. These are my beliefs and not yours, as they should be. So long as you sleep well knowing that you have left local children without parents by choosing a child from some place else on earth. God forbid you help your own. And if you are pro-life and don't adopt just how shallow are your beliefs?
peggy

United States

#15 Feb 14, 2009
There are many ways to offer help, not the least of which is being honest, and trustworthy. There needs to be no propaganda, either religious or political. Just honest help. Being there, if they need or want us there. Trust is big. Who can they trust. Religion did nothing for the Mayans during the massacres. If anything the people were encouraged to turn the other cheek....until a few leaders understood that turning the other cheek was creating more death. But this blog is about hunger. The people need to know that they can trust, and they need to be respected for who they are, not expected to change to be who we think they should be. This is a long complex story and issue, but basically I would say that those who go in to help need to go in with no expectations.....just to feeling of wanting to help.
Wolf

Walnut Creek, CA

#16 May 28, 2011
I am kinda late adding my comment.
I was interested because our medical team will be visiting villages in the Mazatenango area in August. This is our first mission to that area, the previous nine were in Xela and Coatepeque.
We are Methodists, we dont have to preach the bible mainly because these poor Mayans are very religious Catholics

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