Drug compromise is wrong?

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Sheesh

Corsicana, TX

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#1
Jun 9, 2011
 

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http://corsicanadailysun.com/opinion/x1677345...

I respectfully disagree with Oliver Sheehan's opinion on this. I know it's a warm, fuzzy, and politically comfortable opinion to hold in a small town, but the fact is that most of the drug crimes are DUE TO the prohibition of drugs.

This is the same kind of overblown hand-wringing fear that predicted our children would all be drunks or be killed in car accidents if Corsicana legalized beer and wine sales in the city limits.

It didn't happen.

Drug dealers don't card customers. They don't care. It's more difficult for our kids to get alcohol than drugs. Alcohol is safely behind the counter, for adults only.

I think we all agree that prohibition didn't work with alcohol. It was very expensive, created organized crime, and ruined countless lives of otherwise law-abiding, tax paying citizens.

Prohibition doesn't work with drugs, either.
Think about it

Corsicana, TX

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#2
Jun 10, 2011
 
Every comprehensive, objective government commission that has studied the 
issue over the past four decades has recommended that adults should not be 
criminalized for using marijuana.
All drugs are potentially harmful; marijuana is no exception. But by any 
reasonable health standard, marijuana is comparable to alcohol: It’s less 
addictive, far less toxic, and unlike alcohol, marijuana does not make users 
aggressive and violent.
Marijuana prohibition has caused far more harm than marijuana use itself: 
draining precious criminal justice resources from our communities, making it 
difficult to keep marijuana from our children, and destroying the lives and 
families of otherwise law-abiding citizens.
We've been down the prohibition path with alcohol, and it failed miserably. 
Drinking declined a bit, but any benefits were swamped by a huge increase in 
crime and violence generated when prohibition handed the liquor market over 
to gangsters. Crime bosses got rich, the murder rate skyrocketed, the 
prisons filled and deaths from tainted booze soared (after all, you can't 
enforce purity standards on a banned product). We're seeing the same results 
from marijuana prohibition today.
Prohibition has never stopped people from using marijuana, which is the 
largest cash crop in the country and in many places is more widely available 
than alcohol. It just gives criminals and violent gangs an exclusive 
franchise on marijuana sales contributing to border violence, unsafe 
products, and exploitation of children.
Taxing and regulating marijuana would make our communities safer: Removing 
marijuana from the criminal market would free up police time so officers 
could focus on violent crimes, property crimes, and people who drive under 
the influence of alcohol, marijuana, or any other substance. Tax dollars 
would be used to incarcerate real criminals who threaten public safety.
Taxing and regulating marijuana would save taxpayer dollars and generate 
revenue: Each year, the government spends $7-8 billion to arrest and lock up 
nonviolent marijuana users. Taxing marijuana would generate billions in 
government revenue instead of profits for drug dealers. Marijuana 
prohibition is even having a negative impact on our national parks and 
forests. We now have Mexican drug cartels growing millions of plants on 
federal land. This wouldn’t be happening if marijuana were sold in a legal, 
regulated market. A regulated system of producing marijuana would help 
American farmers rather than criminal cartels.
Each year, more arrests are made for marijuana possession than for all 
violent crimes combined. Marijuana arrests in the U.S. now average close to 
850,000 a year – that's one arrest every 37 seconds. And 89% of these 
arrests are for possession, not sale or manufacture.
A recent Gallup poll showed 46% of Americans in favor of making marijuana 
legal for adults, an all-time record. Yet the support in Congress to end 
this failed policy is almost nil. As we see time and time again the public 
is ahead of the politicians in realizing that prohibition is a failed and 
harmful policy, but together we can change that.
From http://www.fearlesscampaign.com/drugpolicy/pa...
Think about it

Corsicana, TX

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#3
Jun 10, 2011
 
Reposting to make it easier to read (I hope):

Every comprehensive, objective government commission that has studied the 
issue over the past four decades has recommended that adults should not be 
criminalized for using marijuana.

All drugs are potentially harmful; marijuana is no exception. But by any 
reasonable health standard, marijuana is comparable to alcohol: It’s less 
addictive, far less toxic, and unlike alcohol, marijuana does not make users 
aggressive and violent.
Marijuana prohibition has caused far more harm than marijuana use itself: 
draining precious criminal justice resources from our communities, making it 
difficult to keep marijuana from our children, and destroying the lives and 
families of otherwise law-abiding citizens.

We've been down the prohibition path with alcohol, and it failed miserably. 
Drinking declined a bit, but any benefits were swamped by a huge increase in 
crime and violence generated when prohibition handed the liquor market over 
to gangsters. Crime bosses got rich, the murder rate skyrocketed, the 
prisons filled and deaths from tainted booze soared (after all, you can't 
enforce purity standards on a banned product). We're seeing the same results 
from marijuana prohibition today.

Prohibition has never stopped people from using marijuana, which is the 
largest cash crop in the country and in many places is more widely available 
than alcohol. It just gives criminals and violent gangs an exclusive 
franchise on marijuana sales contributing to border violence, unsafe 
products, and exploitation of children.

Taxing and regulating marijuana would make our communities safer: Removing 
marijuana from the criminal market would free up police time so officers 
could focus on violent crimes, property crimes, and people who drive under 
the influence of alcohol, marijuana, or any other substance. Tax dollars 
would be used to incarcerate real criminals who threaten public safety.

Taxing and regulating marijuana would save taxpayer dollars and generate 
revenue: Each year, the government spends $7-8 billion to arrest and lock up 
nonviolent marijuana users. Taxing marijuana would generate billions in 
government revenue instead of profits for drug dealers. Marijuana 
prohibition is even having a negative impact on our national parks and 
forests. We now have Mexican drug cartels growing millions of plants on 
federal land. This wouldn’t be happening if marijuana were sold in a legal, 
regulated market. A regulated system of producing marijuana would help 
American farmers rather than criminal cartels.

Each year, more arrests are made for marijuana possession than for all 
violent crimes combined. Marijuana arrests in the U.S. now average close to 
850,000 a year – that's one arrest every 37 seconds. And 89% of these 
arrests are for possession, not sale or manufacture.

A recent Gallup poll showed 46% of Americans in favor of making marijuana 
legal for adults, an all-time record. Yet the support in Congress to end 
this failed policy is almost nil. As we see time and time again the public 
is ahead of the politicians in realizing that prohibition is a failed and 
harmful policy, but together we can change that.
Mr Wisdom

Irving, TX

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#4
Jun 11, 2011
 
Sheesh wrote:
http://corsicanadailysun.com/o pinion/x1677345907/Drug-compro mise-is-wrong
I respectfully disagree with Oliver Sheehan's opinion on this. I know it's a warm, fuzzy, and politically comfortable opinion to hold in a small town, but the fact is that most of the drug crimes are DUE TO the prohibition of drugs.
This is the same kind of overblown hand-wringing fear that predicted our children would all be drunks or be killed in car accidents if Corsicana legalized beer and wine sales in the city limits.
It didn't happen.
Drug dealers don't card customers. They don't care. It's more difficult for our kids to get alcohol than drugs. Alcohol is safely behind the counter, for adults only.
I think we all agree that prohibition didn't work with alcohol. It was very expensive, created organized crime, and ruined countless lives of otherwise law-abiding, tax paying citizens.
Prohibition doesn't work with drugs, either.
These primitive people will never understand even if you show them the facts Mr. Sheesh. Alcohol was a problem until they legalize it. Every time you make something illegal the gangsters will profit. People will use drugs even if they are illegal. Drugs: tobacco, alcohol, pills…
Mr Wisdom

Irving, TX

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#5
Jun 11, 2011
 
Sheesh wrote:
http://corsicanadailysun.com/o pinion/x1677345907/Drug-compro mise-is-wrong
I respectfully disagree with Oliver Sheehan's opinion on this. I know it's a warm, fuzzy, and politically comfortable opinion to hold in a small town, but the fact is that most of the drug crimes are DUE TO the prohibition of drugs.
This is the same kind of overblown hand-wringing fear that predicted our children would all be drunks or be killed in car accidents if Corsicana legalized beer and wine sales in the city limits.
It didn't happen.
Drug dealers don't card customers. They don't care. It's more difficult for our kids to get alcohol than drugs. Alcohol is safely behind the counter, for adults only.
I think we all agree that prohibition didn't work with alcohol. It was very expensive, created organized crime, and ruined countless lives of otherwise law-abiding, tax paying citizens.
Prohibition doesn't work with drugs, either.
Marijuana is a soft drug. Alcohol is a hard drug and is legal. Why?
The physical and social damage of tobacco and alcohol is worst than the damage caused by heroine and cocaine.
I’m not for the legalization of more hard drugs but for Marijuana.
Mr Wisdom

Irving, TX

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#6
Jun 11, 2011
 
Sheesh wrote:
http://corsicanadailysun.com/o pinion/x1677345907/Drug-compro mise-is-wrong
I respectfully disagree with Oliver Sheehan's opinion on this. I know it's a warm, fuzzy, and politically comfortable opinion to hold in a small town, but the fact is that most of the drug crimes are DUE TO the prohibition of drugs.
This is the same kind of overblown hand-wringing fear that predicted our children would all be drunks or be killed in car accidents if Corsicana legalized beer and wine sales in the city limits.
It didn't happen.
Drug dealers don't card customers. They don't care. It's more difficult for our kids to get alcohol than drugs. Alcohol is safely behind the counter, for adults only.
I think we all agree that prohibition didn't work with alcohol. It was very expensive, created organized crime, and ruined countless lives of otherwise law-abiding, tax paying citizens.
Prohibition doesn't work with drugs, either.
Billions of dollars (new taxes).
Billions of dollars in savings (jail).
Billions of dollars in savings by allowing the consumers to be respectful citizens and no 3rd class citizens because they were caught smoking.
Have you realize that Mr. Cotten is not favor because if they legalize them we would not need as many cops.
Who are the lobbies that always fight the legalization?
Jail, cops, alcohol and tobacco lobbies.
They don’t want to lose their piece of the pie.
Sheesh

Corsicana, TX

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#7
Jun 12, 2011
 
“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”~ Albert Einstein

Just say now.
Michael J

Corsicana, TX

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#8
Jun 13, 2011
 

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Four reasons to legalize:

Encouraged criminality: The Department of Justice reported that in 2009, "mid-level and retail drug distribution in the United States was dominated by more than 900,000 criminally active gang members" representing more than 20,000 U.S. gangs.

Institutional hypocrisy: President Obama has admitted to using illegal drugs, President George W. Bush coyly would not say and President Bill Clinton said he didn't inhale. A drug conviction could have curtailed their careers, yet all three presidents were drug warriors in the White House.

Deprived revenue: Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron estimated in 2008 that legalizing drugs could save federal, state and local governments $44 billion per year, while taxing drugs could yield an added $33 billion.

Limiting individual rights: Allow me to quote Neill Franklin, a former Baltimore narcotics cop and executive director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition. "President Obama needs to think about where he would be right now had he been caught with drugs as a young black man. It's probably not in the Oval Office, so why does he insist on ramping up a drug war that needlessly churns other young black men through the criminal justice system?" LEAP will release a report this week that addresses Franklin's concerns.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi...
Sheesh

Corsicana, TX

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#9
Jun 24, 2011
 

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“A Prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded.”
-- Abraham Lincoln
Mr Wisdom

Irving, TX

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#10
Jun 24, 2011
 

Judged:

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Sheesh wrote:
“A Prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded.”
-- Abraham Lincoln
Do people even know about the founders and the principles?
Just saying man…
Sheesh

Corsicana, TX

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#11
Jul 1, 2011
 
“Even if one takes every reefer madness allegation of the prohibitionists at face value, marijuana prohibition has done far more harm to far more people than marijuana ever could.” -- William F. Buckley Jr.
Sheesh

Corsicana, TX

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#12
Jul 3, 2011
 
Love to hear from someone who disagrees on this. Do you think the war on drugs is working and must be continued? Anyone?
Mr Wisdom

Irving, TX

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#13
Jul 5, 2011
 
Sheesh wrote:
Love to hear from someone who disagrees on this. Do you think the war on drugs is working and must be continued? Anyone?
They are too busy at church praying and condemning the sinners…
Sheesh

Corsicana, TX

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#14
Jul 19, 2011
 
Again, I'd love to hear from someone who disagrees on this. Do you think the war on drugs is working and must be continued? Anyone? I know some of you are out there.
Mr Wisdom

Irving, TX

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#15
Jul 19, 2011
 
Sheesh wrote:
Again, I'd love to hear from someone who disagrees on this. Do you think the war on drugs is working and must be continued? Anyone? I know some of you are out there.
Brother the elections are gone. You are not going to hear from them anymore. And the “hard core religious fanatics” of this town (80%) just think you are plain wrong…
They are happy with their tobacco, alcohol and their legal heroine (pills)…
So…

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