Incumbent, newcomer win seats on Cabr...

Incumbent, newcomer win seats on Cabrillo board

There are 3 comments on the Santa Cruz Sentinel story from Nov 4, 2010, titled Incumbent, newcomer win seats on Cabrillo board. In it, Santa Cruz Sentinel reports that:

Both the winners in Tuesday's election for two seats on the Cabrillo Community College Board of Trustees turned in sizeable victories, a sign of the broad support the victors had from current and former board members, administration and labor groups.

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Peter Finegan

Santa Cruz, CA

#1 Nov 4, 2010
Dangerous buildings at Cabrillo Community College
While attending Cabrillo College ten years ago in Santa Cruz County and writing for college newspaper, I noticed serious structural problems with several campus buildings, especially the gymnasium and high-tech center, which could pose a serious hazard to its occupants if a devastating earthquake should occur. seismic tombs. Given what I have learned, no one can make structures impervious to the devastating effects of an earthquake, however, when problems are identified with integrity, pubI have written to the two previous college presidents regarding this serious problem, yet my complaints have merely resulted in a cosmetic cover-up of what could become colossal lic institutions can certainly mitigate potential harm to life and limb.
Specifically, I observed contiguous cracking through the brick stack walls that stretched from the floor to the ceiling in both structures. Before the college white-washed the interior walls inside the gym, the contiguous cracking through the brick stacks and mortar could be seen upon regular intervals approximately six inches away on both sides of the prepressed I-beams that are attached to these brick walls. The same situation presented itself inside the high-tech center, where the college apparently "solved" the problem by softly abrading the cracking and covering it up with some mortar plastering.
As I watch the college spend another round of public bond money on new structures, while neglecting these serious seismic safety issues, I would like to postulate a serious theory that might convince the college to take another hard look at past decisions and coerce the state of California to believe that this critical issue is not unique to just Cabrillo College.
My theory is that the structural steel within these brick stacks are compromised much like an aging person suffering from osteoporosis. Let me quickly explain alkaline chlorosis that I believe is afflicting this structures, many which were built 45-55 years ago during the public building boom embarked by the former California governor Edmund Brown.
Unsealed masonry structures such as the gym and high-tech center at Cabrillo, absorb air and moisture, and such buildings and structures in close proximity to ocean air are prone to an excess intake of salt chlorides.
Sucking in these chlorides like a sponge, the structural rebar becomes more alkaline, and slowly deteriorates the rebar. The interior steel flakes away in sequential layers, and eventually makes the steel separate from the cement.
The end result is that the steel framework which ties these brick stacks together is compromised, the structure loses ductility (ability to flex or stretch with subtle or dramatic movement), and the buildings, without the original integrity of the steel rebar skeleton, are prone to catastrophic collapse of these brick stacks should a large enough earthquake occur. I believe the cracking that I previously observed may be a combination of both alkaline chlorosis and physical movement caused by the Loma Prieta quake of 1989. I believe that at the time of the 1989 earthquake the full effects of alkaline chlorosis had not been fully consummated because it typically takes about fifty years for the full manifestation of this chemical and physical process, and in 1989, the college was just thirty years old. When building engineers were conducting failure analysis of the Cypress Freeway collapse in 1989, alkaline chlorosis was identified as the primary underlying cause of destruction. The cement overpass was not sealed with moisture barrier, much like the apartment structures that "pancaked" in Kobe, Japan after the earthquake there.
Peter Finegan

Santa Cruz, CA

#2 Nov 4, 2010
While attending Cabrillo College ten years ago in Santa Cruz County and writing for college newspaper, I noticed serious structural problems with several campus buildings, especially the gymnasium and high-tech center, which could pose a serious hazard to its occupants if a devastating earthquake should occur. I have written to the two previous college presidents regarding this serious problem, yet my complaints have merely resulted in a cosmetic cover-up of what could become colossal seismic tombs. Given what I have learned, no one can make structures impervious to the devastating effects of an earthquake, however, when problems are identified with integrity, public institutions can certainly mitigate potential harm to life and limb.
Specifically, I observed contiguous cracking through the brick stack walls that stretched from the floor to the ceiling in both structures. Before the college white-washed the interior walls inside the gym, the contiguous cracking through the brick stacks and mortar could be seen upon regular intervals approximately six inches away on both sides of the prepressed I-beams that are attached to these brick walls. The same situation presented itself inside the high-tech center, where the college apparently "solved" the problem by softly abrading the cracking and covering it up with some mortar plastering.
As I watch the college spend another round of public bond money on new structures, while neglecting these serious seismic safety issues, I would like to postulate a serious theory that might convince the college to take another hard look at past decisions and coerce the state of California to believe that this critical issue is not unique to just Cabrillo College.
My theory is that the structural steel within these brick stacks are compromised much like an aging person suffering from osteoporosis. Let me quickly explain alkaline chlorosis that I believe is afflicting this structures, many which were built 45-55 years ago during the public building boom embarked by the former California governor Edmund Brown.
Unsealed masonry structures such as the gym and high-tech center at Cabrillo, absorb air and moisture, and such buildings and structures in close proximity to ocean air are prone to an excess intake of salt chlorides.
Sucking in these chlorides like a sponge, the structural rebar becomes more alkaline, and slowly deteriorates the rebar. The interior steel flakes away in sequential layers, and eventually makes the steel separate from the cement.
The end result is that the steel framework which ties these brick stacks together is compromised, the structure loses ductility (ability to flex or stretch with subtle or dramatic movement), and the buildings, without the original integrity of the steel rebar skeleton, are prone to catastrophic collapse of these brick stacks should a large enough earthquake occur. I believe the cracking that I previously observed may be a combination of both alkaline chlorosis and physical movement caused by the Loma Prieta quake of 1989. I believe that at the time of the 1989 earthquake the full effects of alkaline chlorosis had not been fully consummated because it typically takes about fifty years for the full manifestation of this chemical and physical process, and in 1989, the college was just thirty years old. When building engineers were conducting failure analysis of the Cypress Freeway collapse in 1989, alkaline chlorosis was identified as the primary underlying cause of destruction. The cement overpass was not sealed with moisture barrier, much like the apartment structures that "pancaked" in Kobe, Japan after the earthquake there.
Take A Lesson

Watsonville, CA

#3 Nov 8, 2010
PVUSD Trustrees should study up and take a lesson on the "open and trust" concept with employees, taxpayers, parents, and students.

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