Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.

There are 81691 comments on the The Cincinnati Enquirer story from Jan 5, 2011, titled Hundreds of birds die in western Ky.. In it, The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that:

MURRAY, Ky. - State wildlife officials say "several hundred" dead birds were found near the Murray State University campus last week.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Cincinnati Enquirer.

kevin

Louisa, KY

#92303 Sep 2, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
Is it still in the freezer?
*Cheshire cat grin*... Yep!

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92304 Sep 2, 2013
kevin wrote:
<quoted text>*Cheshire cat grin*... Yep!
Then if my shoe is in the freezer --- where's the tequila bottle?
the mad poet

Nashville, IN

#92305 Sep 2, 2013
Holy hell...this conversation is actually interesting. Why have I not looked at it before. I am intensely fascinated by history, especially history of this region.

I grew up in Livingston county and my father would take me around and show me places that had colorful history. My favorite trip was when we took a copy of Satan's Ferryman and looked up several locations that were used by the Ford's Ferry Gang.

Even as an adult I'll occasionally do the same thing though in Paducah. I think I may have ran a boyfriend off by insisting that he join me on my history walks. I am going to school soon and have yet to decide my major. I dearly wish I could do something involving history but I haven't come across any viable or certain careers along those lines.

That's that for my two cents...keep on being fascinating, lovely people..
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92307 Sep 2, 2013
the mad poet wrote:
Holy hell...this conversation is actually interesting. Why have I not looked at it before. I am intensely fascinated by history, especially history of this region.
I grew up in Livingston county and my father would take me around and show me places that had colorful history. My favorite trip was when we took a copy of Satan's Ferryman and looked up several locations that were used by the Ford's Ferry Gang.
Even as an adult I'll occasionally do the same thing though in Paducah. I think I may have ran a boyfriend off by insisting that he join me on my history walks. I am going to school soon and have yet to decide my major. I dearly wish I could do something involving history but I haven't come across any viable or certain careers along those lines.
That's that for my two cents...keep on being fascinating, lovely people..
Your two cents is invaluable. I assume you mean Livingston County Kentucky. The home of Andrew Jackson Smith who escaped slavery to fight for his freedom and was only one of 17 African Americans (and the only one from kentucky) that was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and that not until it was belatedly awarded by President Bill Clinton in 2001. He had traveled to Massachuttes and enlisted in the 55th regiment. The 55th and it's sister regiment (the 54th) led the charge on Fort Wagner on Morris Island South Carolina and was depicted in the movie "Glory". Smith carried the flags when the colorbearer fell. Two miles of Kentucky Hwy 453 is named the "Andrew Jackson Smith Memorial Highway" and is just north of the LBL, where the highway becomes the TRACE. Good Luck with your studies and your choice of careers.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92310 Sep 2, 2013
the mad poet wrote:
Holy hell...this conversation is actually interesting. Why have I not looked at it before. I am intensely fascinated by history, especially history of this region.

I grew up in Livingston county and my father would take me around and show me places that had colorful history. My favorite trip was when we took a copy of Satan's Ferryman and looked up several locations that were used by the Ford's Ferry Gang.

Even as an adult I'll occasionally do the same thing though in Paducah. I think I may have ran a boyfriend off by insisting that he join me on my history walks. I am going to school soon and have yet to decide my major. I dearly wish I could do something involving history but I haven't come across any viable or certain careers along those lines.

That's that for my two cents...keep on being fascinating, lovely people..
History comes alive and walks through your mind and tingles your senses when Wolf tells a story---
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92311 Sep 2, 2013
* My above reference to 17 African Americans receiving the Congressional Medal of Honor was discussing only the CIVIL War and the stories are from "Hidden History of Kentucky in the Civil War" by Berry Craig.
the mad poet

Nashville, IN

#92312 Sep 2, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
<quoted text>
Your two cents is invaluable. I assume you mean Livingston County Kentucky. The home of Andrew Jackson Smith who escaped slavery to fight for his freedom and was only one of 17 African Americans (and the only one from kentucky) that was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and that not until it was belatedly awarded by President Bill Clinton in 2001. He had traveled to Massachuttes and enlisted in the 55th regiment. The 55th and it's sister regiment (the 54th) led the charge on Fort Wagner on Morris Island South Carolina and was depicted in the movie "Glory". Smith carried the flags when the colorbearer fell. Two miles of Kentucky Hwy 453 is named the "Andrew Jackson Smith Memorial Highway" and is just north of the LBL, where the highway becomes the TRACE. Good Luck with your studies and your choice of careers.
I didn't know that story. I do remember walking through the top of the Smithland cemetery back towards the Fort Smith battlements and asking about the little graves that are a little ways from the others. Several of them show dates of service as well as the dates of the births and deaths. My grandmother told me that they were black soldiers.

I have ancestors on both sides of my family who were slave women so for a time I was very fascinated with the amount of mulattoes and quadroons that were produced in the state of Kentucky. I wrote a short story in high school about a boy who was deeply unsettled about his father selling off the mixed children he had sired with his slave women.

I do have a complaint about Kentucky history though. There is so much more material about the eastern and central portions of the state than there is about western Kentucky. The period of time I am most fascinated with is the 1770's through 1800 in Smithland. It was a rough and violent frontier town with a bad reputation. I know that there must be so many fascinating stories from that time period but they have either been lost forever or have yet to be uncovered.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92313 Sep 2, 2013
the mad poet wrote:
<quoted text>I didn't know that story. I do remember walking through the top of the Smithland cemetery back towards the Fort Smith battlements and asking about the little graves that are a little ways from the others. Several of them show dates of service as well as the dates of the births and deaths. My grandmother told me that they were black soldiers.

I have ancestors on both sides of my family who were slave women so for a time I was very fascinated with the amount of mulattoes and quadroons that were produced in the state of Kentucky. I wrote a short story in high school about a boy who was deeply unsettled about his father selling off the mixed children he had sired with his slave women.

I do have a complaint about Kentucky history though. There is so much more material about the eastern and central portions of the state than there is about western Kentucky. The period of time I am most fascinated with is the 1770's through 1800 in Smithland. It was a rough and violent frontier town with a bad reputation. I know that there must be so many fascinating stories from that time period but they have either been lost forever or have yet to be uncovered.
There was a PBS special that was called "Mixed Race America" that had some fascinating stories from the civil war era. Does the area you are interested in have a local history museum. These are often small rooms in the back of a building; however, I have found a few that really have interesting collections.
Anne

United States

#92314 Sep 2, 2013
Keep up the history lesson! I'm enjoying the stories also !
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92315 Sep 2, 2013
@Mad Poet. The main problem with recorded history of Central and Eastern Kentucky being more prevalent than the Western portions falls back to simply being more populated following the American Revolution. Many of the Central Kentucky counties were not even established until the late 1790s or early 1800s, while Eastern Kentucky is older.

The time frame prior to 1800 for the Western sections mainly involves stories of river pirates and Indian raids... yes, very violent but sadly not well researched or recorded.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92317 Sep 2, 2013
Miss E Font wrote:
<quoted text>
There was a PBS special that was called "Mixed Race America" that had some fascinating stories from the civil war era. Does the area you are interested in have a local history museum. These are often small rooms in the back of a building; however, I have found a few that really have interesting collections.
The Kentucky STATE Historical Society in Frankfort and those of the individual counties have numerous collections available for research.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92318 Sep 2, 2013
It's so quiet---
Wolf is probably sleeping having great dreams about history and dog is holding his bladder for a few more hours. Imposter is fishing and relaxing and Anne is looking at Pinterest.
Shhhh you wake them--- you have to play with them
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92320 Sep 3, 2013
I have been up with the dog and reading about Kentucky and Tennessee during the Civil War where I learned that the western countiies in those 2 states were more pro-Confederate than pro-Union. I always considered the reverse to be the case.

An unsuccessful Convention was even held in Mayfield to merge counties from those areas to become a new Confederate state but was abandonned after Tenn. seceded.

"Orphaned" Ky. rebel sympathizers then went to Tennessee to enlist and "Orphaned" east Tennessee pro-union residents came to Camp Dick Robinson in Garrard County ky. to enlist, where many died from an outbreak of measels.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92321 Sep 3, 2013
My interest (some may even call it an obsession but that does not deter me) in the Civil War era is an attempt at finding my own identity since my grandmother was the daughter of a Union soldier and her husband (my grandfather) was the son of a Confederate.

Plus I live near two historically significant areas, that being Camp Dick Robinson where the Tenn. Orphaned Union sympathizers had enlisted and not far on from there on the north side of the Kentucky river is Camp Nelson where over 10,000 African-Americans were enlisted and trained after the Emancipation Proclamation freed any that joined, but did not free their wives and children that became camp refugees and were evicted from the camp where many starved.

One has to wonder how torn those former claves were as whether to fight for their own freedom versus concern for their starving families?
Anne

United States

#92322 Sep 3, 2013
This waking up at 3:30 Is for the birds!! Lol I'm glad I could grab a couple more hours shut eye!

While I've enjoyed the history stories on here, I'm not a genuine history buff. A couple years ago the job landed us in Maryland and I spent time meandering the country highways. Imagine my surprise when I pulled into a state park and there flew that confederate flag!! A confederate memorial park at lookout point. Then the time I spent in the panhandle of West Virginia was chock full of the confederate history and tours. For whatever reason I had mistakenly believed that area to be all union.

Good Morning! It's going to be a great day!! I'm starting to plan my northern trip and I hope I hit the most colorful time of year! Those endless mountains give quite the show!! Gettysburg is a planned stop. Then I always enjoy Lancaster county. This year I'm traveling alone so I get to see what I want, for as long as I want!!

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#92323 Sep 3, 2013
Anne wrote:
This waking up at 3:30 Is for the birds!! Lol I'm glad I could grab a couple more hours shut eye!

While I've enjoyed the history stories on here, I'm not a genuine history buff. A couple years ago the job landed us in Maryland and I spent time meandering the country highways. Imagine my surprise when I pulled into a state park and there flew that confederate flag!! A confederate memorial park at lookout point. Then the time I spent in the panhandle of West Virginia was chock full of the confederate history and tours. For whatever reason I had mistakenly believed that area to be all union.

Good Morning! It's going to be a great day!! I'm starting to plan my northern trip and I hope I hit the most colorful time of year! Those endless mountains give quite the show!! Gettysburg is a planned stop. Then I always enjoy Lancaster county. This year I'm traveling alone so I get to see what I want, for as long as I want!!
I love my fall foliage trips. WV Babcock state park with the gristmill is a favorite and Ohio/Pennsylvania areas are nice. I want to see Vermont but haven't accomplished that yet. Time to head to work, maybe retirement will render me capable of seeing Vermont.
Till then--- heigh ho heigh ho. Off to work I go
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92324 Sep 3, 2013
@Anne.. West Virginia became a state when it seceded from Virginia and that panhandle area still had many loyalities to old Virginia. The main issues being centered around the farming of the Shenandoah Valley versus the industrial coal mining region where many of the coal miners did not really care about the slave issue but supported the Southern cause since they feared that the freed slaves would take away their employment.

Maryland (a slave state) was the other border state besides Kentucky where the Emancipation Proclamation did not apply. Lincoln did not want to antagonize those two states to further push them into the Confederacy since they were already significantly divided. The Proclamation only applied to those states that had already seceded. Lincoln was quoted as saying that he would wish to have GOD on his side, but he must have Kentucky.

Gettysburg will be a good visit. I have been there twice and there were many Southern loyalties there as well even though it was considered a northern state. Even in some of the extreme north, there were many divided loyalties (and riots) stemming from the fear of the slaves gaining their freedom. Conversely, there were many Union loyalities in the South. It has never been a clear cut dividing line.
Tollesboro Guy

Lexington, KY

#92327 Sep 3, 2013
Ancient Wolf wrote:
@Anne.. West Virginia became a state when it seceded from Virginia and that panhandle area still had many loyalities to old Virginia. The main issues being centered around the farming of the Shenandoah Valley versus the industrial coal mining region where many of the coal miners did not really care about the slave issue but supported the Southern cause since they feared that the freed slaves would take away their employment.
Maryland (a slave state) was the other border state besides Kentucky where the Emancipation Proclamation did not apply. Lincoln did not want to antagonize those two states to further push them into the Confederacy since they were already significantly divided. The Proclamation only applied to those states that had already seceded. Lincoln was quoted as saying that he would wish to have GOD on his side, but he must have Kentucky.
Gettysburg will be a good visit. I have been there twice and there were many Southern loyalties there as well even though it was considered a northern state. Even in some of the extreme north, there were many divided loyalties (and riots) stemming from the fear of the slaves gaining their freedom. Conversely, there were many Union loyalities in the South. It has never been a clear cut dividing line.
Speaking of KY history, many people forget we have a museum at beautiful Blue Licks Stat Park http://parks.ky.gov/parks/resortparks/blue_li...
Sadly, Daniel Boone's son was killed and is buried there. My wife is a native of Robertson county,(smallest county in the state)and attended Deming H.S. which burned to the ground shortly after the new (County School ) opened up, right outside the city limits so revenue flows to the county now, not the city. It is a beautiful park with full amenities (swimming pool, picnic pavilions, playgrounds, RV full service area & hiking trails)
A nice little bit of history right on HWY 68 towards Lexington from maysville.
Anne

United States

#92329 Sep 3, 2013
@AW. My better half had the opportunity to visit Gettysburg about a month ago and is encouraging me to spend a little time there. So that's in my plans. The day he spent there he kept texting me pics of everything that caught his attention. Lol.
@tollesboro guy. I've always enjoyed traveling around kentucky! We've used campers, tents and motels when we've traveled and hope to do a lot more traveling in the near future.
Ancient Wolf

Lexington, KY

#92330 Sep 4, 2013
@Mad Poet... a bit of Smithland... After Grant captured Paducah, he sent troops to Smithland where they set up 2 cannon breastworks overlooking the high ground at Smithland. Those breastworks were collectively known as Fort Smith and the larger breastworks was razed many years ago, but the smaller one survives on a wooded hilltop overlooking Livingston Central High School.

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