Coplay looks to Whitehall for fire help

Coplay looks to Whitehall for fire help

There are 23 comments on the The Morning Call story from Jul 4, 2008, titled Coplay looks to Whitehall for fire help. In it, The Morning Call reports that:

Whitehall Township and Coplay Borough officials have agreed to discuss the township taking over firefighting in the borough.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Morning Call.

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
WOW

Bethlehem, PA

#1 Jul 4, 2008
OH WELL

Since: Feb 07

Walnutport, PA

#2 Jul 4, 2008
For the saftey and protection of the Coplay residents, having Whitehall Fire is about the only solution to this mess. I sure hope the members of the fire company can sleep at night. The Coplay borough residents have them to thank for this mess!
comment

Seoul, Korea

#3 Jul 4, 2008
Coplay just merge with Whitehall Township. I have posted on her many examples of why merging is necessary and this is one of them, basic public safety. After the 5 largest cities, there then are 2563 municipalities with an average population 779. A population of 779 is only 12 distinct family lineages. Is it truly necessary to have a municipality for 12 seperate distinct extended families?

If Pennsylvania is to be competitive from a services delivery, governance, and tax level, it has to get under 1000 municipalities. This would be an average municipality of 1900 residents or approximately 60 distinct family lineages. The eradication of duplication, cost efficiencies, tax base expansion, and potential for attracting qualified personnel are all reason this step has to be taken. This issue can not be ignored for another 50 years. The reality is that these small boroughs can not survive, nor can very small townships.

In Pennsylvania, the power and responsibility for land use planning and controls lies exclusively with county and local governments, as granted by the Pennsylvania Municipalities Planning Code and the respective municipal and county codes. Plumbing, electrical, fire safety or building codes are also enacted and enforced at the local level.

Municipalities in Pennsylvania are self-governing and taxing units that consist of cities, boroughs, and townships. There are 67 counties and 2,568 municipalities in Pennsylvania. The median population of a municipality is 1,800 (but take out 5 largest cities and the median is only 778). When broken down further, roughly 61% or 1,566 municipalities have a population of less than 2,500 people, 31% or 799 municipalities
have a population between 2,500 and 9,999 people, and the remaining 203 municipalities have a population greater than 10,000.

The four largest municipalities are the cities of Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Erie, and Allentown. Fifty-one or 76% of Pennsylvania’s
counties have more than 50% of their municipalities with populations of less than 2,500. These are primarily non-eastern counties. All of the municipalities in Forest, Fulton,
Sullivan, and Susquehanna Counties have populations of less than 2,500 people.

Increasing attention towards quality of life issues such as public health, safety, and land use is placing a greater burden on Pennsylvania’s large number of very small municipalities. They just cannot afford themselves in a modern society, nor have large enough population base to draw trained professionals for many roles in governance. In response, a number of small municipalities have merged or
consolidated. A merger is a boundary change where one unit goes out of existence and is absorbed by another, usually larger unit. Consolidation is a boundary change action where the corporate lives of two or more units terminate upon their combination to create a new and different municipal corporate entity.

Enacted in 1994, the Municipal
Consolidation or Merger Act provides the first uniform statutory process for combining municipalities.

Since 1945, twenty four of Pennsylvania’s municipalities have merged or consolidated with another municipality. Seven or approximately 30% of these boundary changes occurred in the 1990s. At least one merger or consolidation has occurred in 22 out of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties. Erie and Warren Counties have experienced the most merger
activity with two mergers in each county since 1945. Most of the other mergers and consolidations occurred in the Southeast and Southwest, accounting for 6 and 7 municipality boundary changes, respectively.
truth

United States

#4 Jul 5, 2008
comment wrote:
Coplay just merge with Whitehall Township. I have posted on her many examples of why merging is necessary and this is one of them, basic public safety. After the 5 largest cities, there then are 2563 municipalities with an average population 779. A population of 779 is only 12 distinct family lineages. Is it truly necessary to have a municipality for 12 seperate distinct extended families?
If Pennsylvania is to be competitive from a services delivery, governance, and tax level, it has to get under 1000 municipalities. This would be an average municipality of 1900 residents or approximately 60 distinct family lineages. The eradication of duplication, cost efficiencies, tax base expansion, and potential for attracting qualified personnel are all reason this step has to be taken. This issue can not be ignored for another 50 years. The reality is that these small boroughs can not survive, nor can very small townships.
In Pennsylvania, the power and responsibility for land use planning and controls lies exclusively with county and local governments, as granted by the Pennsylvania Municipalities Planning Code and the respective municipal and county codes. Plumbing, electrical, fire safety or building codes are also enacted and enforced at the local level.
Municipalities in Pennsylvania are self-governing and taxing units that consist of cities, boroughs, and townships. There are 67 counties and 2,568 municipalities in Pennsylvania. The median population of a municipality is 1,800 (but take out 5 largest cities and the median is only 778). When broken down further, roughly 61% or 1,566 municipalities have a population of less than 2,500 people, 31% or 799 municipalities
have a population between 2,500 and 9,999 people, and the remaining 203 municipalities have a population greater than 10,000.
The four largest municipalities are the cities of Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Erie, and Allentown. Fifty-one or 76% of Pennsylvania’s
counties have more than 50% of their municipalities with populations of less than 2,500. These are primarily non-eastern counties. All of the municipalities in Forest, Fulton,
Sullivan, and Susquehanna Counties have populations of less than 2,500 people.
Increasing attention towards quality of life issues such as public health, safety, and land use is placing a greater burden on Pennsylvania’s large number of very small municipalities. They just cannot afford themselves in a modern society, nor have large enough population base to draw trained professionals for many roles in governance. In response, a number of small municipalities have merged or
consolidated. A merger is a boundary change where one unit goes out of existence and is absorbed by another, usually larger unit. Consolidation is a boundary change action where the corporate lives of two or more units terminate upon their combination to create a new and different municipal corporate entity.
Enacted in 1994, the Municipal
Consolidation or Merger Act provides the first uniform statutory process for combining municipalities.
Since 1945, twenty four of Pennsylvania’s municipalities have merged or consolidated with another municipality. Seven or approximately 30% of these boundary changes occurred in the 1990s. At least one merger or consolidation has occurred in 22 out of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties. Erie and Warren Counties have experienced the most merger
activity with two mergers in each county since 1945. Most of the other mergers and consolidations occurred in the Southeast and Southwest, accounting for 6 and 7 municipality boundary changes, respectively.
You wasted your time typing this. No one wants to read this crap. Why don't you go merge with the town next to you. I'm sure you'd love to not have your independence, or not have your opinion matter. Please stop posting here. No one likes you, or the 300 other posts you have written.
ooo

AOL

#5 Jul 5, 2008
I thought it was well typed and everything sounds good to me.....The bottom line, "truth" does not want a change.........

fatboy2

“rockin pandas”

Since: Mar 07

Whitehall

#6 Jul 5, 2008
The Truth actually knows the situation and comment is not even close to it. The fact still remains that the residents gave money and time thinking this was there town's fire company just to learned they were robbed by deception. It is time to turn this around and get back what is rightfully owned by the good people of Coplay
ooo wrote:
I thought it was well typed and everything sounds good to me.....The bottom line, "truth" does not want a change.........

fatboy2

“rockin pandas”

Since: Mar 07

Whitehall

#7 Jul 5, 2008
wow good grammer. I need coffee

Since: Feb 07

Walnutport, PA

#8 Jul 5, 2008
fatboy2 wrote:
The Truth actually knows the situation and comment is not even close to it. The fact still remains that the residents gave money and time thinking this was there town's fire company just to learned they were robbed by deception. It is time to turn this around and get back what is rightfully owned by the good people of Coplay
<quoted text>
Which brings up the big question. Just where is all this money that was donated by people who thought it was too help fund the Fire Dept. The residents of Coplay should demand to have this answered.
John

AOL

#9 Jul 5, 2008
Labyrinth wrote:
For the saftey and protection of the Coplay residents, having Whitehall Fire is about the only solution to this mess. I sure hope the members of the fire company can sleep at night. The Coplay borough residents have them to thank for this mess!
Over the last ten years or so, several volunteer fire companies in Pennsylvania have consolidated. Among them include Morgantown and Elverson (now known as Twin Valley), Morrisville Boroughs two stations (now The Morrisville Fire Department), and Bristol Borough's consolidation of stations 25 and 53 (now both station 53). In this day of fewer volunteers and rising operating expenses, consolidation could be the only way for these all volunteer organizations to survive.
Red Baron

Bangor, PA

#10 Jul 5, 2008
truth wrote:
<quoted text>
You wasted your time typing this. No one wants to read this crap. Why don't you go merge with the town next to you. I'm sure you'd love to not have your independence, or not have your opinion matter. Please stop posting here. No one likes you, or the 300 other posts you have written.
Your incorrect, I enjoy the posting. Its factually correct and solidifies the need for various forms of local and county government to reconsider how the business of public services is delivered. Give it a chance.
comment

Seoul, Korea

#11 Jul 6, 2008
I offer only discussion points for survival. I guess Truth would not take my advice, if I offered him a life vest and a place on a row boat as the unsinkable Titanic went down.

He also is entitled to his opinion, but his conjecture that no one cares is erroneous. The people who do care are the ones in these small place who repeatedly see lack of opportunity, higher taxes, and lower public service levels.

Is it that wrong to suggest that a municipal organizational structure that changes average municipality size from 800 to 1800 that would provide for a pool of talented firemen, policemen, municipal workers and have services and a more stable tax base is not a warranted discussion?

The average municipal borders in any county in PA was draw up pre-Civil War and pre-trains. They were set based on walking distances in a day. I think 150 years later much has changed.
truth

United States

#12 Jul 6, 2008
comment wrote:
I offer only discussion points for survival. I guess Truth would not take my advice, if I offered him a life vest and a place on a row boat as the unsinkable Titanic went down.
He also is entitled to his opinion, but his conjecture that no one cares is erroneous. The people who do care are the ones in these small place who repeatedly see lack of opportunity, higher taxes, and lower public service levels.
Is it that wrong to suggest that a municipal organizational structure that changes average municipality size from 800 to 1800 that would provide for a pool of talented firemen, policemen, municipal workers and have services and a more stable tax base is not a warranted discussion?
The average municipal borders in any county in PA was draw up pre-Civil War and pre-trains. They were set based on walking distances in a day. I think 150 years later much has changed.
I have an idea....Why don't you move to coplay then become active in the community and bring up your ideas. If all you're going to do is sit behind your computer somewhere else, I don't give a crap about your opinion.
Bushwacker

AOL

#13 Jul 6, 2008
Maybe they could get Bethlehem firefighters?

fatboy2

“rockin pandas”

Since: Mar 07

Whitehall

#14 Jul 6, 2008
Now that's not nice. Usually you play well with others. He has done some research and just offered an option to consider. I feel bad he plays golf in Korea and Japan and is still bored enough to do all of this research. I propose rather than anger just consider what may be driving this guy. I wish him well.
truth wrote:
<quoted text>
I have an idea....Why don't you move to coplay then become active in the community and bring up your ideas. If all you're going to do is sit behind your computer somewhere else, I don't give a crap about your opinion.
Hurray for Hollywood

AOL

#15 Jul 6, 2008
wizard5by5

Breinigsville, PA

#16 Jul 6, 2008
Wow talk about the loss of what this is about. It is about certain families feeling they own the fire department and the building that we served in for years. My best bet is to join Hokey when they come up with an agreement. When the social club runs an event if any of my neighbors go to it they should be ashamed for helping the people that destroyed our fire department. The company gives a bad name to being a volunteer fireman in Coplay because they make us look like a greedy bunch of a$$holes which most of us are not. But a few families feel like they are owed and need a playhouse to feel good about themselves. Guess what your neighbors look down on all of you who park in that lot.
truth

United States

#17 Jul 7, 2008
wizard5by5 wrote:
Wow talk about the loss of what this is about. It is about certain families feeling they own the fire department and the building that we served in for years. My best bet is to join Hokey when they come up with an agreement. When the social club runs an event if any of my neighbors go to it they should be ashamed for helping the people that destroyed our fire department. The company gives a bad name to being a volunteer fireman in Coplay because they make us look like a greedy bunch of a$$holes which most of us are not. But a few families feel like they are owed and need a playhouse to feel good about themselves. Guess what your neighbors look down on all of you who park in that lot.
The only problem with hokey is that they have already accepted some "boys" from the family that initially depleted the original fire company of it's funds.
truth

United States

#18 Jul 7, 2008
fatboy2 wrote:
Now that's not nice. Usually you play well with others. He has done some research and just offered an option to consider. I feel bad he plays golf in Korea and Japan and is still bored enough to do all of this research. I propose rather than anger just consider what may be driving this guy. I wish him well.
<quoted text>
Thanks for noticing I'm usually adult like on this forum! I just get a little sick and tired of people who have no idea wht is going on sitting at home behing their computers offering opinions on subjects they have no true knowledge of!!!
WOW

Harleyville, SC

#19 Jul 7, 2008
truth wrote:
<quoted text>
The only problem with hokey is that they have already accepted some "boys" from the family that initially depleted the original fire company of it's funds.
Yeah but there is ACCOUNTABILITY in Whitehall.This isn't a little mom and pop shop like coplay, there are actually more than 2 families at a station. As always, When the debate is over slander becomes the tool of the loser.
No Mercy

Nazareth, PA

#20 Jul 7, 2008
truth wrote:
<quoted text>
You wasted your time typing this. No one wants to read this crap. Why don't you go merge with the town next to you. I'm sure you'd love to not have your independence, or not have your opinion matter. Please stop posting here. No one likes you, or the 300 other posts you have written.
Whats the matter?
Did he make your brain work to read it all?
Why did you?
Doesn't your slide at the right side of your screen work so that you can glide past is?

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Coplay Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Barack Obama, our next President (Nov '08) 3 min TSM 1,345,658
News Thousands Protest Roe V. Wade Decision (Jan '08) 39 min Kathwynn 310,636
Review: 3 Diamond Property Management (Feb '13) 13 hr Benjino 14
News Allentown Parking Authority does more than enfo... (Jul '09) Feb 2 Ben 21
Huge Turd Found in Stall of Nightclub Bathroom Feb 2 Kenny 11
Is 40 Below the best club in the Lehigh Valley?? (Apr '08) Feb 2 Kenny 96
News Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski: State of our city... Feb 2 Richard Kranium 2
More from around the web

Personal Finance

Coplay Mortgages