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Jersey Duke

Quakertown, PA

#1 Jul 18, 2013
Not only are they recording all our phone calls, it has now come out that there are thousands of license plate cameras all over the country. This data is kept where? and by Whom? and for how long? The Duke just ordered some Photo Mask covers to distort their pictures!
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#2 Jul 18, 2013
More lies from the idiot who refers to himself in the third person.
Joe

Brooklyn, NY

#3 Jul 18, 2013
Jersey Duke wrote:
Not only are they recording all our phone calls, it has now come out that there are thousands of license plate cameras all over the country. This data is kept where? and by Whom? and for how long? The Duke just ordered some Photo Mask covers to distort their pictures!
A more accurate title for this thread should read, Corbett's State Police are tracking license plate numbers.
Yuck

Quakertown, PA

#4 Jul 18, 2013
Joe wrote:
More lies from the idiot who refers to himself in the third person.
And you don't work and in daddy's basement Kline. When you catch up with the rest of society, fine. Until then, go back in your hole.
Jersey Duke

Quakertown, PA

#5 Jul 18, 2013
Joe wrote:
More lies from the idiot who refers to himself in the third person.
The Duke says-Look up an article in the Wall St Journal and note that DHS under Janet from another Planet, gave $50 Million Dollars in grants to police departments all over the country to buy the equipment. Back to the basement hovel Kline!
Humid

Hatfield, PA

#6 Jul 18, 2013
Jersey Duke wrote:
<quoted text>
The Duke says-Look up an article in the Wall St Journal and note that DHS under Janet from another Planet, gave $50 Million Dollars in grants to police departments all over the country to buy the equipment. Back to the basement hovel Kline!
Why don't you do everyone a favor and provide a link to that web page.
dbar

Perkasie, PA

#7 Jul 18, 2013
http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2012/09/28/how-th...

"The Journal’s analysis shows the majority of plates were captured only once. The average plate was scanned three times during the two-year period."

hardly the Feds watching your every move.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000087239639...

"San Leandro, with a population of about 85,000, had one Federal Signal license-plate reader installed on a police car in 2008 and installed a newer, better one this year, says Police Chief Sandra Spagnoli. She says the technology has helped locate hundreds of stolen cars and solve other crimes.

Recently, she says, a homicide suspect from Las Vegas drove through town—and the scanner spotted his plate. "He took us on a pursuit, and we caught him," she says. "We would not have been able to do that without that system."

Her department plans to retain the data indefinitely, Ms. Spagnoli says. "It's irresponsible if you have something that could solve a crime in the future, and you've dumped it."

and they have been doing it for quite some time.

"Italian defense contractor Finmeccanica SpA introduced plate-recognition cameras to the U.S. in 2004 via its subsidiary, Elsag North America"

"Cynthia Lum, a professor at George Mason University, did a study in 2010 estimating that about 37% of large police departments were using plate readers"

so license plate readers are not new.
as to who has the data the private companies have no controls on who they sell data to.

"Soon he hopes to start selling access to his plate data to bail bondsmen, process servers, private investigators and insurers. "In the next five years, I hope my primary business will be data gathering," he says.

The plates scanned by people such as Mr. Griffin are contributed to Mr. Jackson's central MVTrac database. Mr. Jackson declined to be specific about the total number of scans in the database, but says, "We have [photographs of] a large majority" of registered vehicles in the U.S.

Until recently, rival company Vigilant Solutions, a subsidiary of Digital Recognition Network, provided a counter on its website tallying its plate-scanning database. The latest read: about 700 million scans.

DRN says on its website that it can "combine automotive data such as where millions of people drive their cars…with household income and other valuable information" so companies can "pinpoint consumers more effectively." DRN declined to comment.

"He says the plate trackers are simply shooting video in public, something that is perfectly legal. "I take absolute exception to any government telling me that I can't go into public and take video," Mr. Jackson says. "That's taking my freedoms away." He estimates his company has snapped "hundreds of millions" of photos of plates nationwide."

so when you drive down a public street anyone can snap your plates.
the police have plenty of legitimate uses for the license plate readers.
the private companies are more likely to abuse the data than anyone else.
Jersey Duke

Quakertown, PA

#8 Jul 18, 2013
dbar wrote:
http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/20 12/09/28/how-the-wall-street-j ournal-obtained-the-license-pl ate-data/
"The Journal’s analysis shows the majority of plates were captured only once. The average plate was scanned three times during the two-year period."
hardly the Feds watching your every move.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000087239639...
"San Leandro, with a population of about 85,000, had one Federal Signal license-plate reader installed on a police car in 2008 and installed a newer, better one this year, says Police Chief Sandra Spagnoli. She says the technology has helped locate hundreds of stolen cars and solve other crimes.
Recently, she says, a homicide suspect from Las Vegas drove through town—and the scanner spotted his plate. "He took us on a pursuit, and we caught him," she says. "We would not have been able to do that without that system."
Her department plans to retain the data indefinitely, Ms. Spagnoli says. "It's irresponsible if you have something that could solve a crime in the future, and you've dumped it."
and they have been doing it for quite some time.
"Italian defense contractor Finmeccanica SpA introduced plate-recognition cameras to the U.S. in 2004 via its subsidiary, Elsag North America"
"Cynthia Lum, a professor at George Mason University, did a study in 2010 estimating that about 37% of large police departments were using plate readers"
so license plate readers are not new.
as to who has the data the private companies have no controls on who they sell data to.
"Soon he hopes to start selling access to his plate data to bail bondsmen, process servers, private investigators and insurers. "In the next five years, I hope my primary business will be data gathering," he says.
The plates scanned by people such as Mr. Griffin are contributed to Mr. Jackson's central MVTrac database. Mr. Jackson declined to be specific about the total number of scans in the database, but says, "We have [photographs of] a large majority" of registered vehicles in the U.S.
Until recently, rival company Vigilant Solutions, a subsidiary of Digital Recognition Network, provided a counter on its website tallying its plate-scanning database. The latest read: about 700 million scans.
DRN says on its website that it can "combine automotive data such as where millions of people drive their cars…with household income and other valuable information" so companies can "pinpoint consumers more effectively." DRN declined to comment.
"He says the plate trackers are simply shooting video in public, something that is perfectly legal. "I take absolute exception to any government telling me that I can't go into public and take video," Mr. Jackson says. "That's taking my freedoms away." He estimates his company has snapped "hundreds of millions" of photos of plates nationwide."
so when you drive down a public street anyone can snap your plates.
the police have plenty of legitimate uses for the license plate readers.
the private companies are more likely to abuse the data than anyone else.
Another invasion of privacy, that you libs love.
dbar

Perkasie, PA

#9 Jul 18, 2013
Jersey Duke wrote:
<quoted text>
Another invasion of privacy, that you libs love.
and somehow you expect privacy on a public street.
city police departments are the biggest users and yet they are dwarfed by the private companies invading your privacy as you claim.
curios how the private companies with no legal requirements on how they use data are missing from your complaint. as usual your blind hatred of the President will allow you to blame him for the city of Philadelphia using license plate readers to tow people owing money on parking tickets for example.
or cops scanning plates due to an amber alert.
tsk-tsk
Jersey Duke

Quakertown, PA

#10 Jul 18, 2013
dbar wrote:
<quoted text>
and somehow you expect privacy on a public street.
city police departments are the biggest users and yet they are dwarfed by the private companies invading your privacy as you claim.
curios how the private companies with no legal requirements on how they use data are missing from your complaint. as usual your blind hatred of the President will allow you to blame him for the city of Philadelphia using license plate readers to tow people owing money on parking tickets for example.
or cops scanning plates due to an amber alert.
tsk-tsk
There is no blind hatred of Obama. He has earned it.
dbar

Perkasie, PA

#11 Jul 18, 2013
Jersey Duke wrote:
<quoted text>
There is no blind hatred of Obama. He has earned it.
if by "earned" you mean all the crackpot theories from alex jones and the dregs of wnd.
LOL.

blaming the President for the past and current use of license plate readers is just one example of your hatred.
Info

Quakertown, PA

#12 Jul 18, 2013
Joe and dbar, the ACLU disagrees with you...

The ACLU has revealed that police are using license plate scanners to "amass massive and unregulated databases that can be used to track law-abiding citizens as their go about their daily lives," CBS reports.

Cameras mounted on police cars and overpasses record your license plate number and location. Millions or perhaps even billions of such records are created each year: In Maryland alone, 85 million license plate records were captured in 2012.

The records are checked against "hot lists" of stolen cars. But the data is then stored indiscriminately, regardless of whether the vehicle has been involved in a crimes, and its use is unregulated.

"License plate reader databases open the door to abusive tracking, enabling anyone with access to pry into the lives of his boss, his ex-wife, or his romantic, political, or workplace rivals," the report warns.

The license plate trackers can also be abused to target political groups. Police departments could use the cameras to record and investigate "Tea Party groups, anti-abortion protesters, or the political opposition of a sheriff running for re-election," suggests the report.
dbar

Perkasie, PA

#13 Jul 18, 2013
Info wrote:
Joe and dbar, the ACLU disagrees with you...
The ACLU has revealed that police are using license plate scanners to "amass massive and unregulated databases that can be used to track law-abiding citizens as their go about their daily lives," CBS reports.
Cameras mounted on police cars and overpasses record your license plate number and location. Millions or perhaps even billions of such records are created each year: In Maryland alone, 85 million license plate records were captured in 2012.
The records are checked against "hot lists" of stolen cars. But the data is then stored indiscriminately, regardless of whether the vehicle has been involved in a crimes, and its use is unregulated.
"License plate reader databases open the door to abusive tracking, enabling anyone with access to pry into the lives of his boss, his ex-wife, or his romantic, political, or workplace rivals," the report warns.
The license plate trackers can also be abused to target political groups. Police departments could use the cameras to record and investigate "Tea Party groups, anti-abortion protesters, or the political opposition of a sheriff running for re-election," suggests the report.
suggests the report.

and you forget the biggest problem is private companies doing the data collection.
if anyone would keep track of any groups you mention it would be them.
hired for opposition research. or to get back at an ex-spouse.
again the biggest problem is you have no privacy rights on a public street.
local and State police are the primary government groups using license plate data for reasonable police matters.
for example should the state be prevented from putting the license plate numbers of the cars owned by a person convicted of DUI
so removing that crime enforcement capability accomplishes what aim?
and aside from computers making it easier there is no real difference from a police officer writing down license numbers of people attending a klan meeting or a quaker meeting.
Inquiring Mind

Quakertown, PA

#14 Jul 18, 2013
I've noticed that TV broadcasts always have license plate numbers "fuzzed" out. Must be a legal privacy-related reason why, although I don't think the public has access to DMV records.

License plate photos have been in use at toll booths and parking garages for years and location info on anybody using GPS, OnStar-type services, and cellphone apps is being recorded and stored for a certain period of time. Any expectation of privacy is a thing of the past. This is just the tip of the iceberg.
Humid

Hatfield, PA

#15 Jul 19, 2013
Jersey Duke wrote:
<quoted text>
Another invasion of privacy, that you libs love.
These are companies invading privacy to make money, which conservatives love.
Jersey Duke

Quakertown, PA

#16 Jul 19, 2013
I agree that the photos taken in the public street are not an invasion of privacy in themselves, but when they are collected and kept so that your movement about the country can be reconstructed that is going too far.
Humid

Hatfield, PA

#17 Jul 19, 2013
Jersey Duke wrote:
I agree that the photos taken in the public street are not an invasion of privacy in themselves, but when they are collected and kept so that your movement about the country can be reconstructed that is going too far.
It's been going on for years. If your car was stolen and they found it with this system, you wouldn't have a problem with it. Even one of the groups you hate the most, the ACLU doesn't have a big problem with it.
Humid

Hatfield, PA

#18 Jul 19, 2013
http://www.mcall.com/news/nationworld/pennsyl...

LICENSE-PLATE SCANNERS COLLECTING DATA ON MILLIONS OF U.S. DRIVERS
ACLU: Cops collect info on drivers from license-plate scanners. Lehigh Valley has them.

Law enforcement agencies are using license-plate scanners designed to track down criminals to build databases detailing the whereabouts of millions of U.S. drivers, the American Civil Liberties Union says in a new report.

Police in Allentown, Bethlehem, Easton and elsewhere in the Lehigh Valley use or plan to use the scanners, which quickly photograph passing cars and analyze their license numbers to check against lists of cars sought in investigations.

The ACLU report summarized the advocacy group's 2012 investigation into the way law enforcement agencies collect and store data from license-plate readers, which are typically installed alongside roads or on police cars.

The ACLU's review of documents from 38 states and Washington, D.C., found that the systems are also often used to log databases of information — photos, plate numbers, time and location — gathered by the cameras over months or even years from all the passing cars, not just select ones.

"I think [people] fail to appreciate the tremendous scope of tracking which can occur using license-plate readers," said Catherine Crump, the report's main author. "We've never before lived in a society where you couldn't go out the door without the government knowing where you went."

Pennsylvania State Police used 25 license-plate scanners statewide from 2009 until last year, when the units were returned to the Pennsylvania Auto Theft Prevention Authority, which had provided them for a trial period.

Two of those cameras were deployed in the Lehigh Valley, having been installed on patrol cars based at Troop M, Bethlehem. Though stolen vehicles were the prime target, officials said the units also were used for other investigations.

Pennsylvania state police Lt. Jeffrey Hopkins said earlier this year there were no immediate plans for state police to purchase cameras of their own. Their use had been of limited value in finding stolen vehicles. For example, of 3.3 million plates scanned in 2011, only 30 stolen vehicles were identified.

The Easton and Bethlehem police departments each acquired one scanner recently through a federal grant program, Easton Mayor Sal Panto Jr. said Thursday.

Easton officers are learning how to use the system and expect to deploy it in coming weeks. The city initially plans to target residents who haven't paid parking fines, but the system could be used for other enforcement, the mayor said.

"I don't have any concerns" about violating citizens' privacy or civil liberties, Panto said. "We'll use whatever technology we can to keep the city safe" while maintaining "fair and consistent" application of the laws, he said.

The scanners also are used locally for parking enforcement, including in Allentown. The city Parking Authority's cameras are tailored specifically to recognize parked vehicles that have exceeded their stay in limited-time zones.

Unlike scanners used by police, the Parking Authority's readers are not linked to law enforcement or transportation department databases, according to authority Executive Director Tamara Dolan.

Wednesday's ACLU report, based on documents the organization's affiliates received from local police departments through 587 requests under the Freedom of Information Act, gives new fodder to the growing debate over the scope of the U.S. government's surveillance.

Law enforcement authorities say gathering data on the comings and goings of U.S. drivers is a valuable resource for speedier investigations, including future ones.
Humid

Hatfield, PA

#19 Jul 19, 2013
page 2

The ACLU said it does not oppose the use of license-plate readers in fighting crime, but worries about the massive systems of location tracking being too broad and ripe for abuse, be it personal by individual officers or political by institutions.

"While it is legitimate to use license-plate readers to identify those who are alleged to have committed crimes, the overwhelming majority of people whose movements are monitored and recorded by these machines are innocent, and there is no reason for the police to be keeping records on their movements," the group said in its report.

According to the report, "only a fraction of 1 percent" of license-plate scans done by the readers are hits for cars of interest to law enforcement, and fewer lead to an arrest.

How long law enforcement authorities keep the records from license-plate scanners varies. Some agencies, such as the Ohio State Highway Patrol or the Minnesota State Patrol, quickly delete data on regular passers-by, the report says.

In other jurisdictions, such as Tiburon, Calif., or Burbank, Ill, the data are kept for less than a month. In New Jersey, the law requires storage for five years. In some jurisdictions, such as Yonkers in New York and Mesquite in Texas, the retention is indefinite, according to the report.
Jersey Duke

Quakertown, PA

#20 Jul 19, 2013
Humid wrote:
<quoted text>It's been going on for years. If your car was stolen and they found it with this system, you wouldn't have a problem with it. Even one of the groups you hate the most, the ACLU doesn't have a big problem with it.
If you read the last post you put up the ACLU agrees with me.

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