Richland Twp SUV at St Isidore's for ...

Richland Twp SUV at St Isidore's for personal use? Maybe...

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Interesting

Quakertown, PA

#1 Feb 13, 2013
Rather odd, or not.

Someone was using the white SUV to go to Ash Wednesday mass at 4:30 today.

St. Izzy's is in Milford. There was no "official" reason it should have been there.

Unfortunately, I didn't see who was using it. It was in the back parking lot where the rcycling bins are, but up near the main drive into the lot.
Convent

Hatfield, PA

#2 Feb 13, 2013
Interesting wrote:
Rather odd, or not.
Someone was using the white SUV to go to Ash Wednesday mass at 4:30 today.
St. Izzy's is in Milford. There was no "official" reason it should have been there.
Unfortunately, I didn't see who was using it. It was in the back parking lot where the rcycling bins are, but up near the main drive into the lot.
So why didn't you wait around and take the guy's picture?
Eating Out

Allentown, PA

#3 Feb 13, 2013
Go choke on some more "man meat" Interesting! You're a BEYATCH...
Interesting

Quakertown, PA

#4 Feb 13, 2013
Convent wrote:
<quoted text>So why didn't you wait around and take the guy's picture?
I was already in my car and stuck in all the exit traffic when I noticed it.

I'm just curious as to what "official" business Richland had with church after hours.

This stinks of bad Friday fish to me.
interesting

Quakertown, PA

#5 Feb 13, 2013
And you have the balls to just come from church.

Why do you care?
Howabout drop dead.
Convent

Hatfield, PA

#6 Feb 14, 2013
Interesting wrote:
<quoted text>
I was already in my car and stuck in all the exit traffic when I noticed it.
I'm just curious as to what "official" business Richland had with church after hours.
This stinks of bad Friday fish to me.
Ever since Orloff got in, there's been all kinds of back room deals and looking the other way on stuff like this. It isn't going to change until a lot of people get pissed off about it and vote him out.
NoBama

Mechanicsville, VA

#7 Feb 14, 2013
Convent wrote:
<quoted text>Ever since Orloff got in, there's been all kinds of back room deals and looking the other way on stuff like this. It isn't going to change until a lot of people get pissed off about it and vote him out.
Yep, the township and water authority just use the official vehicles as their own. Nobody seems to care. I know they're not insured for it. Just more lawsuits waiting to happen. Orloff? He'll get re-elected. Only the scum that backs him vote. A shame really.
Interesting

Quakertown, PA

#8 Feb 14, 2013
interesting wrote:
And you have the balls to just come from church.
Why do you care?
Howabout drop dead.
Why do I care?

I pay taxes in Richland and if this vehicle is involved in an accident, after hours, we'd be open to a lawsuit for that reason...it was used for personal use and not official business.

I wish I had seen who was driving because I would contact the township office and ask why.

Nice comment.."drop dead."

We're you the one driving it???
OMG

Lansdale, PA

#9 Feb 14, 2013
This stuff only seems to go on when gas prices go up. Leeching off the taxpayer is the name of their game. I do hope they get into an accident,it may wake the people up when the twp. freeloaders dig deeper into the taxpayers pockets. Infact I hope they run into me, because I'll sue the hell out of them.
Convent

Hatfield, PA

#10 Feb 14, 2013
Interesting wrote:
<quoted text>
Why do I care?
I pay taxes in Richland and if this vehicle is involved in an accident, after hours, we'd be open to a lawsuit for that reason...it was used for personal use and not official business.
I wish I had seen who was driving because I would contact the township office and ask why.
Nice comment.."drop dead."
We're you the one driving it???
I'm sure the township has a blanket insurance policy that covers anyone driving any of their vehicles in or out of the township. If the policy doesn't cover personal use, they'll just make up some kind of "official business".
Typical Quakertown

Philadelphia, PA

#11 Feb 14, 2013
A few words on the committee that actually decides this whole thing
Editor's note: This file has been updated to include all games through Tuesday, Feb. 12.

The NCAA tournament selection committee has come a long way.
By which I mean: We know what the NCAA tournament selection committee is, we know what it does, we know whom it comprises.
These may seem like baseline expectations. But for years the process gave off the same vague vibe as the back room at a mid-century political party convention, replete with middle-aged white men smoking cigars, slapping backs and haggling over tournament bids with as minimal rigor as possible. And then everyone played golf.
That (probably) wasn't the case, but the point is, to the outside observer, that's what it felt like. Fans didn't know how these things worked. Dark insinuations -- of committee members jobbing rival programs or coaches they didn't like; of members not being "basketball people" and thus casual about the entire enterprise -- were easy to make.
It's not so easy anymore. In recent years, the NCAA -- led by former VP Greg Shaheen -- has made great strides in increasing transparency of the selection process. Every year it invites various media members to participate in a mock bracket exercise, which is one part education and one part simulation, and is no less nerdy than your average "Dungeons and Dragons" game. It's easy to get a feel for the mechanics of the process, to see how the NCAA organizes its information, to understand how all of these discrete decisions come together in the course of just a few days.
Plus, the committee members are no longer opaque. Far from it. Indeed, the committee chair is always very visible, and not only on the Selection Sunday post-reveal grilling. In recent years, committee chairs have begun participating in conference calls and taking media interviews far before the bracket is due. Current chair Mike Bobinski appeared on Andy Katz and Seth Greenberg's college basketball podcast Monday, where he talked extensively about his philosophy on the committee. On Wednesday afternoon, he will conduct his first conference call with the media.
You still hear some of the old conspiracy talk from time to time.(The Washington Post's John Feinstein has remained stubbornly convinced the process can't be transparent until the actual committee room has cameras in it.) And not every committee chair is good at articulating the specific reasons behind certain decisions.(Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith was particularly frustrating on this front.)
But the bottom line is both media members and fans can now understand NCAA tournament selection in ways we never could before. The process, to a large extent, has been demystified. That allows us to be more exacting with our criticisms, sure -- and we'll have a lot more of those before the 2013 Bubble Watch finishes its work -- but it also allows us to recognize that, at the end of the day, it's just a bunch of people in a room trying to figure out college basketball. We can all identify with that.
Without further ado, here's your second edition of the 2013 Watch.(Last week's first edition covered the season recap need-to-knows. From here on out, we'll be focusing on the latest weekly results.)
Typical Quakertown

Philadelphia, PA

#12 Feb 14, 2013
A few words on the committee that actually decides this whole thing
Editor's note: This file has been updated to include all games through Tuesday, Feb. 12.

The NCAA tournament selection committee has come a long way.
By which I mean: We know what the NCAA tournament selection committee is, we know what it does, we know whom it comprises.
These may seem like baseline expectations. But for years the process gave off the same vague vibe as the back room at a mid-century political party convention, replete with middle-aged white men smoking cigars, slapping backs and haggling over tournament bids with as minimal rigor as possible. And then everyone played golf.
That (probably) wasn't the case, but the point is, to the outside observer, that's what it felt like. Fans didn't know how these things worked. Dark insinuations -- of committee members jobbing rival programs or coaches they didn't like; of members not being "basketball people" and thus casual about the entire enterprise -- were easy to make.
It's not so easy anymore. In recent years, the NCAA -- led by former VP Greg Shaheen -- has made great strides in increasing transparency of the selection process. Every year it invites various media members to participate in a mock bracket exercise, which is one part education and one part simulation, and is no less nerdy than your average "Dungeons and Dragons" game. It's easy to get a feel for the mechanics of the process, to see how the NCAA organizes its information, to understand how all of these discrete decisions come together in the course of just a few days.
Plus, the committee members are no longer opaque. Far from it. Indeed, the committee chair is always very visible, and not only on the Selection Sunday post-reveal grilling. In recent years, committee chairs have begun participating in conference calls and taking media interviews far before the bracket is due. Current chair Mike Bobinski appeared on Andy Katz and Seth Greenberg's college basketball podcast Monday, where he talked extensively about his philosophy on the committee. On Wednesday afternoon, he will conduct his first conference call with the media.
You still hear some of the old conspiracy talk from time to time.(The Washington Post's John Feinstein has remained stubbornly convinced the process can't be transparent until the actual committee room has cameras in it.) And not every committee chair is good at articulating the specific reasons behind certain decisions.(Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith was particularly frustrating on this front.)
But the bottom line is both media members and fans can now understand NCAA tournament selection in ways we never could before.
dbar

Perkasie, PA

#13 Feb 14, 2013
Interesting wrote:
<quoted text>
Why do I care?
I pay taxes in Richland and if this vehicle is involved in an accident, after hours, we'd be open to a lawsuit for that reason...it was used for personal use and not official business.
I wish I had seen who was driving because I would contact the township office and ask why.
Nice comment.."drop dead."
We're you the one driving it???
just for info.
what is stopping you from calling the township office and asking who was driving a township vehicle as you state?
you are concerned about it so why not ask?
Yasir

Philadelphia, PA

#15 Feb 17, 2013
White SUV? Maybe the cop was on a break and used it for a positive reason. Call Feeko to voice your issue. If I was a boss, that wouldn't concern me. If I'm not mistaken, the township border is Portzer Rd, that church is literally on the border. You people really need to consider seeking help.
Interesting

Quakertown, PA

#16 Feb 18, 2013
Yasir wrote:
White SUV? Maybe the cop was on a break and used it for a positive reason. Call Feeko to voice your issue. If I was a boss, that wouldn't concern me. If I'm not mistaken, the township border is Portzer Rd, that church is literally on the border. You people really need to consider seeking help.
It wasn't a police vehicle. I was white and and "Richland Township" printed on the side. The RTWA has a white Explorer, don't they?
Shloppy

Quakertown, PA

#17 Feb 18, 2013
Convent wrote:
<quoted text>I'm sure the township has a blanket insurance policy that covers anyone driving any of their vehicles in or out of the township. If the policy doesn't cover personal use, they'll just make up some kind of "official business".
What kind of "Official Business" will they make up when one of their family members gets killed in a crash?
Yasir

Philadelphia, PA

#18 Feb 18, 2013
If I'm not mistaken, I believe that several townships in the upper end share resources.
Aimee

Allentown, PA

#19 Feb 18, 2013
Since it was Ash Wednesday...maybe he stopped to get ashes. Maybe it was on the way home....maybe someone should not complain on here till they complain to the "higher up's"...then complain on here with what happened.
Have a super sparkley day!
Yasir

Philadelphia, PA

#20 Feb 18, 2013
Aimee, one of the smart ones. Most likely a Qtown implant.
Info

Quakertown, PA

#21 Feb 18, 2013
Yasir wrote:
If I'm not mistaken, I believe that several townships in the upper end share resources.
Milford has its own water authority, so, no sharing there.

Fire and emergency services are shared in case of large situations.

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