No Fracking In Eastern Pennsylvania!

No Fracking In Eastern Pennsylvania!

Posted in the Coopersburg Forum

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bethwhistler

Quakertown, PA

#1 Oct 4, 2012
I'm disappointed in Governor Corbett, for whom I voted, because of the bad fracking agenda being pushed onto the Delaware River watershed area. Very few jobs are created with this industry and a great deal of destruction occurs to the environment.

I wouldn't be surprised if the freak earthquake we had last year wasn't a consequence of the fracking going on in the western regions of Pennsylvania and other locations in the eastern shale.

This must stop before we destroy our fresh water supply. Once you've cracked the protective layers and let these toxins escape, there's not way to repair or reverse the damage. There is no requirement for the energy companies to release what chemicals they are using to the public so who knows what's being dumped and/or transported into the lands surrounding our neighborhoods, farmlands, and communities?

Here's just one informative link from geology.com : http://geology.com/articles/marcellus-shale.s...

Video regarding Marcellus Shale:
&fe ature=related

Claims by the fracking industry are that the rock is cracked so far below the surface that it does not affect the water table from which we access our drinking water but this is not true. Take a look at the "Gasland" video on YouTube.

Here's a very recent video from Colorado. Is this what we have to look forward to? http://www.youtube.com/watch...
i luv this area

Quakertown, PA

#2 Oct 4, 2012
This is a monstrously bad way to mine. This has to stop. But, a few entitled individuals who profit from the practice have already caused irreversible damage for generations to come. What were they thinking? Oh, that's right. A quick buck. Please stop now.
bethwhistler

Quakertown, PA

#3 Oct 4, 2012
Several experts are claiming the widespread lack of accessible/drinkable water supply in 62% of the USA is not just being caused by drought/lack of rainfall but by the massive use of water being taken from rivers and other water sources for the purpose of fracking.

Why don't the frackers recycle their own contaminated water to do their dirty work instead of what remains of our freshwater supply? What will happen when the Delaware River runs dry and all our wells and springs have fracking gas and chemicals in them?

Do the wealthy frackers have their own private source of clean water that we don't know about? If not, they're killing themselves and their descendants along with the rest of us.
Get REAL

Allentown, PA

#4 Oct 4, 2012
Oh no, the crazy greenies are out.... Gas is close to $4 dollars a gallon and unemployment is over 8 percent. We need energy and jobs. Drill Baby Drill!!!!!
bethwhistler

Quakertown, PA

#5 Oct 4, 2012
One of my sons said, "We'll have to buy bottled water," which made me realize that the same jerks who own the fracking operations also own bottled water companies. So, when they've destroyed public access to fresh drinking water, we'll be forced to purchase their bottled water. It's a win-win for the fracking-bottled water conglomerate!
Jersey Duke

Quakertown, PA

#7 Oct 4, 2012
Fracking is safe and has never caused any problem with drinking water. Who is behind the anti- fracking hysteria-- Russia, the oil shieks, Hugo Chavez, etc. The last thing they want is for the US to be energy independent!!! You anti-fracking losers are being used like puppets.
smiley

Saint Clair, PA

#8 Oct 4, 2012
Jersey Duke wrote:
Fracking is safe and has never caused any problem with drinking water. Who is behind the anti- fracking hysteria-- Russia, the oil shieks, Hugo Chavez, etc. The last thing they want is for the US to be energy independent!!! You anti-fracking losers are being used like puppets.
Too bad I didnt take photos of the creek that runs thriugh Owrlds End State Park.

A scummy layer floating on top, areas of the creek dirty, others clean..very low water level.

Hey if fracking comes down your way us "crackers" can then call u folkls "frackers"...
too funny...

doesnt feel so good when the shoe is on the other foot, does it?

They destroyed the coal regions and if theres money in it the gov is involved too.
Theyre all linng their pockets.

Add to the mix, the foreigners who are involved in these projects.
Sightings of Chinese pulling up in Limos at the potential gas sites...

As far as jobs go, those workers are very well paid. I met a few families involved in it. They chase the work throughout the country moving along with the gas companies.
I was told by one man that his 19 yr old son working as a laborer was paid starting rate of 1500.00 a week, no exp. full benefits(co. pd insurance too)
dbar

Perkasie, PA

#9 Oct 4, 2012
Jersey Duke wrote:
Fracking is safe and has never caused any problem with drinking water. Who is behind the anti- fracking hysteria-- Russia, the oil shieks, Hugo Chavez, etc. The last thing they want is for the US to be energy independent!!! You anti-fracking losers are being used like puppets.
maybe in your own little bubble there is no problem with fracking.
in the real world
try
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/05/18/chesape...

"The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection fined Chesapeake $900,000 for contaminating water supplies inBradford County, a busy drilling area in the prolific Marcellus shale gas formation,"

"Tuesday’s action stems from complaints that gas near drilling wells had seeped into the drinking water.

The agency began an investigation in February 2010 after receiving complaints from residents about drinking water near Chesapeake shale gas drilling sites. The agency concluded that contamination was caused by improper well casing and cementing, allowing seepage from non-shale shallow gas formations.

“The water well contamination fine is the largest single penalty DEP has ever assessed against an oil and gas operator,” said Mike Krancer, secretary for the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)."
bethwhistler

Quakertown, PA

#10 Oct 5, 2012
I love our Delaware River, I love the woods and cliffs and creeks that run all through our area. I love hiking and seeing the beautiful bluebirds and wildlife and enjoying the safe, clean environment in which we still live.

For ten years-worth of gas and a few greedy people adding another million dollars to their pockets, we are destroying more of God's creation.

Don't you have children or grandchildren "Jersey Duke" or "RINO" or "Get Real?" Won't it be sad for them when they go to show their children where the Delaware River used to be before it dried up? They'll wonder what it was like to drink water from the faucet.

Or do you guys think the asteroid coming by the earth in 2014 will wipe us all out anyway so it's a non-issue?

I'd rather have little material wealth and live in a clean, beautiful world than be rich and live in a desolate, toxic wasteland. It all depends on your perspective and yours is very different from mine.

I don't see why you need to attack people or be a jerk just because someone holds a different opinion than yours.
smiley

Saint Clair, PA

#12 Oct 5, 2012
RINOHatER wrote:
<quoted text>
Bit of a Drama Queen there, Beth. Lighten up and live for the Boobies :-)
Maybe u should take a ride up along route 11 beginning in harrisburg.
As u drive along note how low the river is. further north u will see creek beds, river tributries that once flowed with beautiful crystal clear waters look more like small streams with a scummy film floating on top.

Where do you think that water is headed? Do you know?
Info

Quakertown, PA

#13 Oct 5, 2012
bethwhistler wrote:
One of my sons said, "We'll have to buy bottled water," which made me realize that the same jerks who own the fracking operations also own bottled water companies. So, when they've destroyed public access to fresh drinking water, we'll be forced to purchase their bottled water. It's a win-win for the fracking-bottled water conglomerate!
So, Coca-Cola and Pepsico are now in the fracking business?

Too funny!

Are you going to have a conniption of Romney starts drilling in ANWR--where NOTHING lives?

http://www.snopes.com/politics/gasoline/anwr....
smiley

Saint Clair, PA

#15 Oct 5, 2012
RINOHatER wrote:
<quoted text>
I can tell you that I am in Wiiliamsport as we speak. The Heart of Frack country. Been living with these guys all week. Water doesn't look very low here. Maybe Ron Paul can help you out.
What makes Williamsport the heart of Frack country?

the branch of the Susq coming from Williamsport is west branch.

Travel up to areas near Worlds End, Eagles Mere, Dushore, Sullivan county
The creeks up there are awfully low.
I have been visiting that area for a few decades, and I have never seen those creeks so low...not until the fracking began.
And its not just low water levels, its pollution...
some places it looks oily others its a froathy scum...
Wow

Quakertown, PA

#16 Oct 5, 2012
US definately needs to be energy independent and it can do that IF people want to, gov't won't matter. It's the people that have the power to make that happen. There is no doubt about that.

As to bottled water,... I always thought it funny how many neighbors from foreign countries only had bottled water trucked in weekly.
smiley

Saint Clair, PA

#17 Oct 5, 2012
Not all bottled water companies are in the business of water for fracking.

The state permits only so many gallons of water daily that a bottler can draw.

I did however recall reading a story of man who owned property next to a creek.
He was granted permission to withdraw water for fracking!

I dont view him as having the same rights to that water as someone who has an actual spring on their property.

In PA, the extraction of water for bottlers is considered agricultural.
I have a friend who owns several springs.

With the one spring, the Susquehanna River Basin Commission allows him 200,000 gallons per day! He bottles private label from that spring.

Still alot of water if u think about it, but certainly must be alot less than the fracking uses.
BTW, his water comes from springs on the properties he owns.
Wow

Quakertown, PA

#18 Oct 5, 2012
A University of Texas study led by Charles G. Groat listed water contamination and consumption, blowouts, explosions, spill management, atmospheric emissions, and health effects as associated problems.[17] The UT study described the environmental impact of each part of the hydraulic fracturing process, which included:
Drill pad construction and operation
Construction, integrity, and performance of the wellbores
Injection of the fluid once it is underground (which proponents consider the actual "fracking")
Flowback of the fluid back towards the surface
Blowouts, often unreported, which spew hydraulic fracturing fluid and other byproducts across surrounding area
Integrity of other pipelines involved
Disposal of the flowback, including waste water and other waste products

All but the injection stage were reported to be sources of contamination.[17][56][57]

Because hydraulic fracturing originated in the United States,[58] its history is more extensive there than in other regions. Most environmental impact studies have therefore taken place there.

In 2011 a Duke University study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences examined methane in groundwater in PENNSYVANIA and New York states overlying the Marcellus Shale and the Utica Shale. It determined that groundwater tended to contain much higher concentrations of methane near fracking wells, with potential explosion hazard; the methane's isotopic signatures and other geochemical indicators were consistent with it originating in the fracked deep shale formations, rather than any other source.[69]
Wow

Quakertown, PA

#19 Oct 5, 2012
The New York Times has reported radiation in hydraulic fracturing wastewater released into rivers in Pennsylvania.[81] It collected data from more than 200 natural gas wells in Pennsylvania and has posted a map entitled Toxic Contamination from Natural Gas Wells in Pennsylvania. Sand containing gamma-emitting tracer isotopes is used to trace and measure fractures.[22] Individuals exposed to high enough levels of radiation may experience symptoms of acute radiation syndrome, including fatigue, leukopenia, fever, diarrhea, vomiting, nose bleeds, dizziness, disorientation, low blood pressure, seizures, and tremors.[82] The Times stated "never-reported studies" by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and a "confidential study by the drilling industry" concluded that radioactivity in drilling waste cannot be fully diluted in rivers and other waterways.[83] Despite this, as of early 2011 federal and state regulators did not require sewage treatment plants that accept drilling waste (which is mostly water) to test for radioactivity. In Pennsylvania, where the drilling boom began in 2008, most drinking-water intake plants downstream from those sewage treatment plants have not tested for radioactivity since before 2006.[81] The New York Times reporting has been criticized by aggrieved parties,[84] but one venerable science writer has taken issue with one instance of the newspaper's presentation and explanation of its calculations regarding dilution,[85] charging that a lack of context made the article's analysis uninformative.[86]
According to a Times report in February 2011, wastewater at 116 of 179 deep gas wells in Pennsylvania "contained high levels of radiation," but its effect on public drinking water supplies is unknown because water suppliers are required to conduct tests of radiation "only sporadically".[87] The New York Post stated that the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection reported that all samples it took from seven rivers in November and December 2010 "showed levels at or below the normal naturally occurring background levels of radioactivity", and "below the federal drinking water standard for Radium 226 and 228."[88] However the samples taken by the state at at least one river,(the Monongahela, a source of drinking water for parts of Pittsburgh), were taken upstream from the sewage treatment plants accepting drilling waste water.[89]
In Pennsylvania, much of this wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations is processed by public sewage treatment plants. However, many sewage plants say that they are incapable of removing the radioactive components of this waste, which is often released into major rivers. Industry officials, though, claim that these levels are diluted enough that public health is not compromised.[81] This is a major concern as it provides the possibility for radioactive waste to enter into public water supplies.
The New York Times has implicated the DEP in industry-friendly inactivity, requesting rather than requiring them to handle their own flowback waste rather than sending it to public water treatment facilities.[90] However, former Pennsylvania DEP Secretary John Hanger, who served under Gov. Ed Rendell (D), has affirmed that municipal drinking water throughout the state is safe, but added that the environmentalists were accurate in stating that Pennsylvania's water treatment plants were not equipped to treat hydraulic fracturing water.[91]
Wow

Quakertown, PA

#20 Oct 5, 2012
Current Pennsylvania DEP Secretary Michael Krancer serving under Gov. Tom Corbett (R) has denied that untreated wastewater is being discharged into the state's waterways.[92] It has been observed that Corbett received over a million dollars in gas industry contributions,[93] more than all his competitors combined, during his election campaign.[94] The New York Times reported that regulations are lax in Pennsylvania.[81] The oil and gas industry is generally left to police itself in the case of accidents. Unannounced inspections are not made by regulators: the companies report their own spills, and create their own remediation plans.[81] A recent review of the state-approved plans found them to appear to be in violation of the law.[81] Treatment plants are still not equipped to remove radioactive material and are not required to test for it.[81] Despite this, in 2009 the Ridgway Borough's public sewage treatment plant, in Elk County, PA, facility was sent wastewater containing radium and other types of radiation at at 275-780 times the drinking-water standard. The water being released from the plant was not tested for radiation levels.[81] Part of the problem is that growth in waste produced by the industry has outpaced regulators and state resources.[81] It should be noted that "safe drinking water standards" have not yet been set for many of the substances known to be in hydrofracturing fluids or their radioactivity levels,[81] and their levels are not included in public drinking water quality reports.[95]

makes me want to build my own filter, buy Iodine tabs, and boil water
Wow

Quakertown, PA

#21 Oct 5, 2012
According to a Times report in February 2011, wastewater at 116 of 179 deep gas wells in Pennsylvania "contained high levels of radiation," but its effect on public drinking water supplies is unknown because water suppliers are required to conduct tests of radiation "only sporadically".[87] The New York Post stated that the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection reported that all samples it took from seven rivers in November and December 2010 "showed levels at or below the normal naturally occurring background levels of radioactivity", and "below the federal drinking water standard for Radium 226 and 228."[88] However the samples taken by the state at at least one river,(the Monongahela, a source of drinking water for parts of Pittsburgh), were taken upstream from the sewage treatment plants accepting drilling waste water.[89]

In Pennsylvania, much of this wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations is processed by public sewage treatment plants. However, many sewage plants say that they are incapable of removing the radioactive components of this waste, which is often released into major rivers. Industry officials, though, claim that these levels are diluted enough that public health is not compromised.[81] This is a major concern as it provides the possibility for radioactive waste to enter into public water supplies.

wtf
wtfrack
bethwhistler

Quakertown, PA

#22 Oct 5, 2012
Wow wrote:
The New York Times has reported radiation in hydraulic fracturing wastewater released into rivers in Pennsylvania.[81] It collected data from more than 200 natural gas wells in Pennsylvania and has posted a map entitled Toxic Contamination from Natural Gas Wells in Pennsylvania. Sand containing gamma-emitting tracer isotopes is used to trace and measure fractures.[22] Individuals exposed to high enough levels of radiation may experience symptoms of acute radiation syndrome, including fatigue, leukopenia, fever, diarrhea, vomiting, nose bleeds, dizziness, disorientation, low blood pressure, seizures, and tremors.[82] The Times stated "never-reported studies" by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and a "confidential study by the drilling industry" concluded that radioactivity in drilling waste cannot be fully diluted in rivers and other waterways.[83] Despite this, as of early 2011 federal and state regulators did not require sewage treatment plants that accept drilling waste (which is mostly water) to test for radioactivity. In Pennsylvania, where the drilling boom began in 2008, most drinking-water intake plants downstream from those sewage treatment plants have not tested for radioactivity since before 2006.[81] The New York Times reporting has been criticized by aggrieved parties,[84] but one venerable science writer has taken issue with one instance of the newspaper's presentation and explanation of its calculations regarding dilution,[85] charging that a lack of context made the article's analysis uninformative.[86]
According to a Times report in February 2011, wastewater at 116 of 179 deep gas wells in Pennsylvania "contained high levels of radiation," but its effect on public drinking water supplies is unknown because water suppliers are required to conduct tests of radiation "only sporadically".[87] The New York Post stated that the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection reported that all samples it took from seven rivers in November and December 2010 "showed levels at or below the normal naturally occurring background levels of radioactivity", and "below the federal drinking water standard for Radium 226 and 228."[88] However the samples taken by the state at at least one river,(the Monongahela, a source of drinking water for parts of Pittsburgh), were taken upstream from the sewage treatment plants accepting drilling waste water.[89]
In Pennsylvania, much of this wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations is processed by public sewage treatment plants. However, many sewage plants say that they are incapable of removing the radioactive components of this waste, which is often released into major rivers. Industry officials, though, claim that these levels are diluted enough that public health is not compromised.[81] This is a major concern as it provides the possibility for radioactive waste to enter into public water supplies.
The New York Times has implicated the DEP in industry-friendly inactivity, requesting rather than requiring them to handle their own flowback waste rather than sending it to public water treatment facilities.[90] However, former Pennsylvania DEP Secretary John Hanger, who served under Gov. Ed Rendell (D), has affirmed that municipal drinking water throughout the state is safe, but added that the environmentalists were accurate in stating that Pennsylvania's water treatment plants were not equipped to treat hydraulic fracturing water.[91]
Exactly!!! Thank you for posting this.
bethwhistler

Quakertown, PA

#23 Oct 5, 2012
Info wrote:
<quoted text>
So, Coca-Cola and Pepsico are now in the fracking business?
Too funny!
Are you going to have a conniption of Romney starts drilling in ANWR--where NOTHING lives?
http://www.snopes.com/politics/gasoline/anwr....
Huh? Who's talking about Coke and Pepsi? Who's talking about the desert?

I'm concerned about my own "backyard" and the beautiful Delaware River. I'm concerned what's going to be seeping into the natural springs and well water in our area.

We don't even know what chemicals the frackers use and they're not required to inform the public.

Are the frackers going to give a list to our water testing facilities that test our drinking water for contaminants?

Will our water facilities, Quakertown Borough and Bucks County Water Authority, have the ability to properly test, monitor, warn and/or remove contaminants that enter our water supply?

How often will those tests be done? Some of the tests we currently have reported to us are only done every few years. A lot can happen to our water supply in a few days or months when fracking retaining tanks crack and leak.

We wonder why so many children are being born with autism, Asperger's, and ADHD in the past 40 years. Do you think it may possibly be due to all the chemicals in our plastics, gasoline additives, and other unsuspected everyday items?

I don't think it's being overly dramatic to be concerned about our freshwater supply. There's only a limited amount and once we've contaminated it all, how do you propose we remove those contaminants?

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