BEST high risk OBGYN
sayin

Crossville, TN

#41 Apr 21, 2013
URANIDIOT wrote:
<quoted text>
How many years of medical OR nursing school did you go through to come up with that opinion? Physicians LOVE nurse practitioners because they, on the whole, result in improved patient outcome! Nurse practitioners do not know as much as doctors, but they DO know as much about their specialty as any doctor. Many of them HAVE completed doctorate-level education. Maybe of them HAVE attended internships and residencies designed specifically for nurse practitioners. Doctors wouldn't be letting them work under their license if they didn't trust them.
All of this is true. It takes just as long to complete a DNP as it does to complete an MD and there are residency programs out there for nurse practitioners just like doctors. There is a push to make completion of DNP and residency mandatory for all NPs by 2025.

Medical school was not always a doctorate program. Physicians weren't always required to complete residency. In the UK, medical school is a bachelor degree program and a MD from over there is entirely comparable to an MD in the States which just goes to show that the number of years it takes to complete any given professional program is irrelevant to a point. The lines that have always existed between medical doctors and advanced practice nurses are becoming increasingly blurred. Many physicians welcome it. Others are intimidated by the fact that an entirely autonomous nurse practitioner, which is the way in which the healthcare field is trending, would be able to offer the exact same services at a fraction of the cost.
Anonymous

Cookeville, TN

#42 Apr 22, 2013
sayin wrote:
<quoted text>
All of this is true. It takes just as long to complete a DNP as it does to complete an MD and there are residency programs out there for nurse practitioners just like doctors. There is a push to make completion of DNP and residency mandatory for all NPs by 2025.
Medical school was not always a doctorate program. Physicians weren't always required to complete residency. In the UK, medical school is a bachelor degree program and a MD from over there is entirely comparable to an MD in the States which just goes to show that the number of years it takes to complete any given professional program is irrelevant to a point. The lines that have always existed between medical doctors and advanced practice nurses are becoming increasingly blurred. Many physicians welcome it. Others are intimidated by the fact that an entirely autonomous nurse practitioner, which is the way in which the healthcare field is trending, would be able to offer the exact same services at a fraction of the cost.
Sounds like you do not like the fact you could not get into medical school. I am not degrading NPs I am just stating they would not be taking care of me as high risk period. You can down play education all you want be any person on here knows the reality of many years of education combined with experience USUALLY brings better outcomes. I am not bad mouthing you let's be adults.
really

Cookeville, TN

#43 Apr 22, 2013
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>Sounds like you do not like the fact you could not get into medical school. I am not degrading NPs I am just stating they would not be taking care of me as high risk period. You can down play education all you want be any person on here knows the reality of many years of education combined with experience USUALLY brings better outcomes. I am not bad mouthing you let's be adults.
they didn't indicate anywhere that they were a np. does one have to be a member of any given group in order to defend it? of you beleive for a moment that nurse midwife is not qualified to care for high risk pregnancies, you're stuck in the 80's. time to come out from under that rock you've been living under for the past 33 years.
cav supporter

Cookeville, TN

#44 Apr 22, 2013
um yeah1212 wrote:
even tho 45 million americans equaling out to roughly 15% get them


I have to agree if you can't afford to buy groceries, how do you plan on being able to afford a child? Are the rest of us gonna pay for your kid as well as your groceries ?
Rabbi Rabinowitz

United States

#45 Apr 22, 2013
So much for acting like adults.
lol

United States

#46 Apr 22, 2013
Who in the world thinks a nurse practitioner or nurse midwife has anywhere near the same education or skills as an MD? I wouldn't see a nurse/midwife for anything other than routine care.

You would have to be nuts to use a nurse midwife...
Anonymous

Cookeville, TN

#47 Apr 22, 2013
lol wrote:
Who in the world thinks a nurse practitioner or nurse midwife has anywhere near the same education or skills as an MD? I wouldn't see a nurse/midwife for anything other than routine care.
You would have to be nuts to use a nurse midwife...
I am with you bc guess what they are not qualified to do c- sections either! So if something happens during labor you get to wait for them to call the doc and SOMETIMES every second counts. No way on high risk pt. They are great for normal deliveries and great with helping docs w pt load and routine care.
Lulz

Crossville, TN

#48 Apr 22, 2013
lol wrote:
Who in the world thinks a nurse practitioner or nurse midwife has anywhere near the same education or skills as an MD? I wouldn't see a nurse/midwife for anything other than routine care.
You would have to be nuts to use a nurse midwife...
Tell that to the MDs who train them.
interesting take

Crossville, TN

#49 Apr 22, 2013
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>I am with you bc guess what they are not qualified to do c- sections either! So if something happens during labor you get to wait for them to call the doc and SOMETIMES every second counts. No way on high risk pt. They are great for normal deliveries and great with helping docs w pt load and routine care.
MD training: 4 years udergrad + 4 years professional + Internship/residency/fellowshi p
DNP training: 4 years undergrad + 4 years professional + Internship/residency/fellowshi p

Somewhere in the land of obtuseness, a village is missing its idiot.
Cytochrome

Crossville, TN

#50 Apr 22, 2013
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>I am with you bc guess what they are not qualified to do c- sections either! So if something happens during labor you get to wait for them to call the doc and SOMETIMES every second counts. No way on high risk pt. They are great for normal deliveries and great with helping docs w pt load and routine care.
Guess what: Just because somebody can DO something doesn't mean they're good at it. OB/GYNs aren't known for having impeccable surgical skills. With the exception of a small minority, their surgical training is minimal and their technique is sloppy. Over a four year residency they spend probably 11-12 months in the OR and very few programs include ICU rotations as part of their residency. OB/GYN is by far the most lacking surgical specialty out there so don't be so quick to assume that they're more prepared than an advanced practice nurse. Yes they get to hold a scalpel but in all other regards, they provide no additional benefits when compared to a nurse nurse practitioner.
As a gas man myself, I am privileged enough to witness surgeries on all services - and OB/GYN is the worst as far as technical skill is concerned. The slightest surgical gaffe, and 2-3 liters of blood later, they end up calling in a second pair of hands and most of the time I pray for a random PGY-3 or PGY-4 general surgery resident to come in and fix the problem.
In fact, if my wife should ever need a pelvic exoneration, or a hysterectomy, or anything else having to do with the girly bits, I would rather her be worked on by a general surgeon...but that's an aside.
I stand by the other remarks left here. There is absolutely nothing wrong with nurse midwives taking on high risk patients. Physicians who see high risk patients, and those who don't, will not share their practice with people who can't be trusted to not injure or kill somebody. I find it strange that you would be so quick to dismiss the skills of a nurse practitioner when physician assistants are able to perform 80% of a physician's duties with only a bachelor's degree.
hannibal

United States

#51 Apr 22, 2013
Cytochrome wrote:
<quoted text>
Guess what: Just because somebody can DO something doesn't mean they're good at it. OB/GYNs aren't known for having impeccable surgical skills. With the exception of a small minority, their surgical training is minimal and their technique is sloppy. Over a four year residency they spend probably 11-12 months in the OR and very few programs include ICU rotations as part of their residency. OB/GYN is by far the most lacking surgical specialty out there so don't be so quick to assume that they're more prepared than an advanced practice nurse. Yes they get to hold a scalpel but in all other regards, they provide no additional benefits when compared to a nurse nurse practitioner.
As a gas man myself, I am privileged enough to witness surgeries on all services - and OB/GYN is the worst as far as technical skill is concerned. The slightest surgical gaffe, and 2-3 liters of blood later, they end up calling in a second pair of hands and most of the time I pray for a random PGY-3 or PGY-4 general surgery resident to come in and fix the problem.
In fact, if my wife should ever need a pelvic exoneration, or a hysterectomy, or anything else having to do with the girly bits, I would rather her be worked on by a general surgeon...but that's an aside.
I stand by the other remarks left here. There is absolutely nothing wrong with nurse midwives taking on high risk patients. Physicians who see high risk patients, and those who don't, will not share their practice with people who can't be trusted to not injure or kill somebody. I find it strange that you would be so quick to dismiss the skills of a nurse practitioner when physician assistants are able to perform 80% of a physician's duties with only a bachelor's degree.
I love your "girls bits" remark. Made me laugh.

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#52 Apr 22, 2013
cav supporter wrote:
<quoted text>
I have to agree if you can't afford to buy groceries, how do you plan on being able to afford a child? Are the rest of us gonna pay for your kid as well as your groceries ?
Once again, let me repeat since you obviously only read what you want. When i got pregnant, and had each of my children,I had a good job, working roughly 60-65 hours a week. Shit happens, peopleget laid off. Get off your high horse
Anonymous

Cookeville, TN

#53 Apr 22, 2013
interesting take wrote:
<quoted text>
MD training: 4 years udergrad + 4 years professional + Internship/residency/fellowshi p
DNP training: 4 years undergrad + 4 years professional + Internship/residency/fellowshi p
Somewhere in the land of obtuseness, a village is missing its idiot.
Then why can't they practice without being under MD? Maybe you got lost
smile

Crossville, TN

#54 Apr 22, 2013
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>Then why can't they practice without being under MD? Maybe you got lost
They're getting to that point. Change takes time. Give it a damn minute, jeeze. It took osteopathic physicians over 100 years to gain the level of recognition they have today and they didn't even start from scratch. Nursing is an entirely different field based around an entirely different model. You also have to take into consideration the fact that it was traditionally "women's work" so even though it's been around as a profession since the 17th century, it didn't start evolving into a terminal profession until the 50's when a female nurse and a male doctor collaborated and coined the idea of advanced practice nursing.
Diesel

Crossville, TN

#55 Apr 22, 2013
Cytochrome wrote:
<quoted text>
OB/GYNs aren't known for having impeccable surgical skills...if my wife should ever need [OB surgery] I would rather her be worked on by a general surgeon...but that's an aside.
That may be, but the truth is that general surgeons are lower than GYNs because GYNs are the specialists in pelvic and vaginal surgery, whereas general surgeons are now left with mostly minor/routine abdominal procedures.
gensurg

Crossville, TN

#56 Apr 23, 2013
Diesel wrote:
<quoted text>
That may be, but the truth is that general surgeons are lower than GYNs because GYNs are the specialists in pelvic and vaginal surgery, whereas general surgeons are now left with mostly minor/routine abdominal procedures.
I recently did a liver resection and hepaticojejunostomy for locally extensive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder on a 65 year old man. Why don't you tell that couple that his surgery was more minor than his wife's hysterectomy? They might beg to differ.

When the gynecologists do a resection for cancer which requires retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, guess who they call to scrub the case with them and keep them out of trouble? You're looking at him.

(wow. didn't realize so many educated people lurked on these forums lol)
need input

Cookeville, TN

#57 Apr 24, 2013
To set the record straight. I discussed my pregnancy options before my husband and I tried to conceive with my Vandy Dr.. And if I could still take my meds while pregnant. I work a full time job and have insurance with my employer. Not on any state assistance! I knew about the medication. I was just fishing to see if they had prior experience or knowledge of my condition and meds.
Never

Crossville, TN

#58 Apr 24, 2013
need input wrote:
my husband and I tried to conceive with my Vandy Dr
Glad to see you're doing your part to help give homes to the hundreds of thousands of children in the foster system (/sarcasm)
need input

Cookeville, TN

#59 Apr 24, 2013
Never wrote:
<quoted text>
Glad to see you're doing your part to help give homes to the hundreds of thousands of children in the foster system (/sarcasm)
Since you are such the worried citizen. How many foster children do you have?
Never

Crossville, TN

#60 Apr 24, 2013
need input wrote:
<quoted text>
Since you are such the worried citizen. How many foster children do you have?
None. But I also don't have any children of my own and haven't spent thousands of dollars trying to force my body to give birth when there is a surplus of unwanted children who will never have a family.

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