Randy Johnson

Portland, MI

#1 Oct 16, 2010
That painting brings back fond memories.
I first met Johnny Walker through Bob Lines. Johnny had hiked all of the Jenny Wiley Trail in eastern Kentucky and was contemplating a hike of the Appalachian Trail. He wanted my advice on the gear he was taking. I gave it. He ignored one of the more important pieces,(Ditch that huge bag of coffee and replace it with high-calorie food) and as a result got more than a little hungry on his first hike.
His approach to hiking the AT was one used by many other hikers as well; section hiking. Instead of trying to do the whole thing at once, section hikers spread an end to end hike over several years, usually hiking a week or two at a time. Johnny took his first step on the AT at its southern terminus on Springer Mountain in Georgia when he was 76 years old. I’m not sure how old he was when age and family concerns finally made him give up on his quest, but by that time he had made it as far as New Hampshire.
I hiked a few days with Johnny, covering the section from Carvers Gap in Tennessee’s Roan Mountain State Park, to Hampton, TN. I did uphills faster than he did, he downhills faster than I did, and we both did generally level sections at the same speed. Somewhere, I have a picture of Johnny making the climb out of Yellow Mountain Gap on the TN/NC line. Below him a small farmstead is visible. The only building remaining today is the barn which has been converted to a nice, and extremely large, trail shelter. The area around the farmstead was used for location shooting of an old Kurt Russell movie, Winter People.
But back to the painting.
I loved that house. Until the place was sold, and the contents auctioned off, I had always thought the bookcases - and there were many - were built in. I was really surprised to see them standing free the day of the auction. There are two buildings with weathered siding shown to the right of the painting. As I remember it, the closest one was the building Johnny referred to as his “pouting shed”. It had a nice stone fireplace. Among the décor was a spinning wheel that was 18th or early 19th century. The day of the auction I looked inside and noticed Johnny’s first pack, in poor condition, lying over in one corner.
I have his last pack, the only thing I bought at the auction. It will probably never happen, but I like to think that someday it will complete the journey that was interrupted at the Connecticut River years ago.
Observer

United States

#2 Oct 16, 2010
I can remember my grandmother talking about Johnny Walker and I wonder if it is the same person? How thoughtful of you to rescue the "pack".
Matt ledford

Rushville, IN

#3 Oct 16, 2010
Walker. Texas ranger.
Randy Johnson

United States

#4 Oct 16, 2010
Observer wrote:
I can remember my grandmother talking about Johnny Walker and I wonder if it is the same person? How thoughtful of you to rescue the "pack".
It probably was the same person.
I think Johnny passed away in June 2008. He was in his nineties. I was out on a hike at the time and missed the funeral.
Johnny was the owner of Walker’s Grocery in the Beeson’s area. That particular store was the subject of a thread within the last two weeks.
Most of us, during the course of a lifetime, get to know a handful of people who touch our lives and leave a positive impression that never fades with the passage of years. Johnny was one the people who touched my life.
Matt Ledford

Rushville, IN

#5 Oct 16, 2010
a Texas Ranger always gets his man.
Observer

United States

#6 Oct 16, 2010
Yes, Randy, that was him; she went to Walker's market.
Matt ledford

Rushville, IN

#7 Oct 16, 2010
Cause the eyes of the ranger are upon you, anything you do he's gonna see, when your on Texas look behind you, cause that's where the rangers gonna be.

“GO LITTLE VETTE”

Since: Mar 08

Location hidden

#8 Oct 16, 2010
Randy Johnson wrote:
That painting brings back fond memories.
I first met Johnny Walker through Bob Lines. Johnny had hiked all of the Jenny Wiley Trail in eastern Kentucky and was contemplating a hike of the Appalachian Trail. He wanted my advice on the gear he was taking. I gave it. He ignored one of the more important pieces,(Ditch that huge bag of coffee and replace it with high-calorie food) and as a result got more than a little hungry on his first hike.
His approach to hiking the AT was one used by many other hikers as well; section hiking. Instead of trying to do the whole thing at once, section hikers spread an end to end hike over several years, usually hiking a week or two at a time. Johnny took his first step on the AT at its southern terminus on Springer Mountain in Georgia when he was 76 years old. I’m not sure how old he was when age and family concerns finally made him give up on his quest, but by that time he had made it as far as New Hampshire.
I hiked a few days with Johnny, covering the section from Carvers Gap in Tennessee’s Roan Mountain State Park, to Hampton, TN. I did uphills faster than he did, he downhills faster than I did, and we both did generally level sections at the same speed. Somewhere, I have a picture of Johnny making the climb out of Yellow Mountain Gap on the TN/NC line. Below him a small farmstead is visible. The only building remaining today is the barn which has been converted to a nice, and extremely large, trail shelter. The area around the farmstead was used for location shooting of an old Kurt Russell movie, Winter People.
But back to the painting.
I loved that house. Until the place was sold, and the contents auctioned off, I had always thought the bookcases - and there were many - were built in. I was really surprised to see them standing free the day of the auction. There are two buildings with weathered siding shown to the right of the painting. As I remember it, the closest one was the building Johnny referred to as his “pouting shed”. It had a nice stone fireplace. Among the décor was a spinning wheel that was 18th or early 19th century. The day of the auction I looked inside and noticed Johnny’s first pack, in poor condition, lying over in one corner.
I have his last pack, the only thing I bought at the auction. It will probably never happen, but I like to think that someday it will complete the journey that was interrupted at the Connecticut River years ago.
Randy it sounds like you two had some quality time together. It is so sad that when someone passes all their things are just scattered throughout the world and nothing is left but memories. At least you have one precious memento from his wonderful life
Matt ledford

Rushville, IN

#9 Oct 16, 2010
The unsuspecting stranger, have better know the truth of wrong from right.
Elizabeth Kuhn

Memphis, TN

#10 Feb 24, 2011
Johnny Walker was my great grandfather. I wish I had known him better. I was probably ten years old the last time I saw him. His widow, Winnie, passed away this morning, and it set me to looking up more information about them both. Is there anyone who could point me toward more information about them? I would especially like to know more about their younger days, and their relationship/marriage, and their interests, what they liked to do for fun. Obviousely Great Grandpa loved to hike, but that was late in his life. I know he had a grocery store for a while, but not much else. I got to see the farm a few times, but I was too young to ask these questions, then. Any help would be appreciated.:-)
Randy Johnson wrote:
That painting brings back fond memories.
I first met Johnny Walker through Bob Lines. Johnny had hiked all of the Jenny Wiley Trail in eastern Kentucky and was contemplating a hike of the Appalachian Trail. He wanted my advice on the gear he was taking. I gave it. He ignored one of the more important pieces,(Ditch that huge bag of coffee and replace it with high-calorie food) and as a result got more than a little hungry on his first hike.
His approach to hiking the AT was one used by many other hikers as well; section hiking. Instead of trying to do the whole thing at once, section hikers spread an end to end hike over several years, usually hiking a week or two at a time. Johnny took his first step on the AT at its southern terminus on Springer Mountain in Georgia when he was 76 years old. I’m not sure how old he was when age and family concerns finally made him give up on his quest, but by that time he had made it as far as New Hampshire.
I hiked a few days with Johnny, covering the section from Carvers Gap in Tennessee’s Roan Mountain State Park, to Hampton, TN. I did uphills faster than he did, he downhills faster than I did, and we both did generally level sections at the same speed. Somewhere, I have a picture of Johnny making the climb out of Yellow Mountain Gap on the TN/NC line. Below him a small farmstead is visible. The only building remaining today is the barn which has been converted to a nice, and extremely large, trail shelter. The area around the farmstead was used for location shooting of an old Kurt Russell movie, Winter People.
But back to the painting.
I loved that house. Until the place was sold, and the contents auctioned off, I had always thought the bookcases - and there were many - were built in. I was really surprised to see them standing free the day of the auction. There are two buildings with weathered siding shown to the right of the painting. As I remember it, the closest one was the building Johnny referred to as his “pouting shed”. It had a nice stone fireplace. Among the décor was a spinning wheel that was 18th or early 19th century. The day of the auction I looked inside and noticed Johnny’s first pack, in poor condition, lying over in one corner.
I have his last pack, the only thing I bought at the auction. It will probably never happen, but I like to think that someday it will complete the journey that was interrupted at the Connecticut River years ago.
Observer

Orange, VA

#11 Feb 24, 2011
So sorry for your loss. I remember my grandmother talking about Johnny, but I cannot remember any details other than the name sure sticks with me for some reason.

Where is that farm, picture, located?
Lynn

Bloomington, IN

#12 Jul 9, 2013
Elizabeth Kuhn wrote:
Johnny Walker was my great grandfather. I wish I had known him better. I was probably ten years old the last time I saw him. His widow, Winnie, passed away this morning, and it set me to looking up more information about them both. Is there anyone who could point me toward more information about them? I would especially like to know more about their younger days, and their relationship/marriage, and their interests, what they liked to do for fun. Obviousely Great Grandpa loved to hike, but that was late in his life. I know he had a grocery store for a while, but not much else. I got to see the farm a few times, but I was too young to ask these questions, then. Any help would be appreciated.:-)
<quoted text>
I know all about John Walker and his life-if you care to e-mail me at [email protected]
Lynn

Bloomington, IN

#13 Jul 9, 2013
Elizabeth Kuhn wrote:
Johnny Walker was my great grandfather. I wish I had known him better. I was probably ten years old the last time I saw him. His widow, Winnie, passed away this morning, and it set me to looking up more information about them both. Is there anyone who could point me toward more information about them? I would especially like to know more about their younger days, and their relationship/marriage, and their interests, what they liked to do for fun. Obviousely Great Grandpa loved to hike, but that was late in his life. I know he had a grocery store for a while, but not much else. I got to see the farm a few times, but I was too young to ask these questions, then. Any help would be appreciated.:-)
<quoted text>
There is a book called Memories of My Grandfather by Cynthia Long that tells all about John Walker's life, marriage, kids, fun etc. You can find the book at Barnes and Nobles or other book stores.

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