fried mush for breakfast anyone

fried mush for breakfast anyone

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Can not remember

Greensburg, KY

#1 Jul 17, 2010
I was remembering back when I was a young kid…
Ok, this is for the older crowd to answer. My Parents use to cook something we called fried mush. It was some sort of corn product I'm sure. They purchased it at the store and it was sold in rolls or blocks, I’m really not sure. They sliced it from a roll (?) like sausage and then fried it in a cast iron pan in some oil. Is this the correct name and is this product still being sold at the local stores? Respectful answers are welcomed.
Miss Mushy

Burkesville, KY

#2 Jul 17, 2010
Yes, you are correct, it is called mush. I have not seen mush sold in grocery stores around here. I used to buy it in the logs (like sausage) up north, but haven't ever seen it locally. You can make your own though. It has been a long since I have made it (I found the recipe on-line) but it is simply boiling corn meal and water for so long, then pouring it in a pan and letting it set up in the refrigerator if I remember correctly. You got me wanting it now, lol, I may just have to look that back up. Happy Mush Hunting!
ninja

Jamestown, KY

#3 Jul 18, 2010
Can not remember wrote:
I was remembering back when I was a young kid…
Ok, this is for the older crowd to answer. My Parents use to cook something we called fried mush. It was some sort of corn product I'm sure. They purchased it at the store and it was sold in rolls or blocks, I’m really not sure. They sliced it from a roll (?) like sausage and then fried it in a cast iron pan in some oil. Is this the correct name and is this product still being sold at the local stores? Respectful answers are welcomed.
had it for any meal .you get your water boiling and salted then mix your corn meal with a little water ,pour into the water and cook 2 or 3 min .pour into a bowl(a baking powder can is good)
set in frig till next day then slice and fry in bacon grease
this is really good
but make sure its thick enough when you take it up
um um good

Burkesville, KY

#4 Jul 18, 2010
Slice ,fry ,and serve with maple syrup and sausage links just like waffle or pancakes. its good for the body.
Can not remember

Greensburg, KY

#5 Jul 18, 2010
Thanks everyone! I located a recipe to try and wanted to share it with you all.

Ingredients
• 3 cups water
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 cup yellow cornmeal
• 1 tablespoon butter
Directions
1. In a medium saucepan, heat water to boiling. Reduce heat to medium; stir in salt and cornmeal. Cook, stirring regularly, until mixture is thick.
2. Spoon cornmeal mixture into a lightly greased 9x5 inch loaf pan. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
3. In the morning, melt butter in a skillet over medium high heat. Slice cornmeal mush into 1 inch wide slices. Cook in melted butter until golden brown on both sides.
old timer

Greensburg, KY

#6 Jul 19, 2010
This is the same thing older people calls Bulldog gravy except it is not fried.You us the same mixture just make gravy instead of letting it set
Gravy lover

Buffalo, TX

#7 Jul 19, 2010
My Grandparents spoke of bulldog gravy but I always thought they were talking about plain white flour breakfast gravy made with the drippings from bacon, ham or sausage.

Are you sure bulldog gravy is made with cornmeal?
old timer

Clarkson, KY

#8 Jul 19, 2010
Gravy lover wrote:
My Grandparents spoke of bulldog gravy but I always thought they were talking about plain white flour breakfast gravy made with the drippings from bacon, ham or sausage.
Are you sure bulldog gravy is made with cornmeal?
Yeah bulldog gravy was made with cornmeal.
ninja

Jamestown, KY

#9 Jul 20, 2010
old timer wrote:
<quoted text>Yeah bulldog gravy was made with cornmeal.
made with corn meal it was called meal gravy. bull dog gravy was what they called it made with flour
google answer

Elizabethtown, KY

#10 Jul 20, 2010
Food and The Great Depression
by Lynn Kerrigan
"Often the number of meals was cut from three to two a day. Guests were no longer invited for dinner. Milk consumption was reduced, fresh fruit virtually disappeared, eggs took the place of meat, drippings stood in for butter. Families fell back on their historic staples: pasta and beans for Italian-Americans, corn meal for Southern blacks and whites, and beans and pancakes for Northern native-born whites. The most common complaint was about the monotony of these diets; that the fruits, meats and delicacies that added variety had disappeared." —Harvey Levenstein. Paradox of Plenty. A Social History of Eating in Modern America.(New York, Oxford Univ. Press. 1993)
Food riots broke out in small towns across America as hungry crowds shouted "We want food. We will not let our children starve." Severe drought dried up crops over much of the South. Alabama sharecroppers got by on their 3M diet-meat (salt-pork) corn meal and molasses. Al Capone opened a Chicago breadline. America is shocked to hear about people fighting for rotten food in St. Louis garbage dumps.********* An Appalachian coal miner's luncheon often consisted of beans and "bulldog gravy" (flour, water and grease), accompanied by a "water sandwich" (stale bread soaked in lard and water).******** One Appalachian food-saving strategy had the children eat on alternate days. People are evicted from their homes for non-payment of rent. Shantytowns comprised of large crates sprouted in large cities to house the booming homeless population. 90,000 businesses failed completely. 15 million people lost their jobs. The ones who were lucky enough to keep working saw their wages cut in half. 20,000 people committed suicide. 10,000 banks collapsed, losing 2 million dollars in deposits. The economic catastrophe known as The Great Depression and its impact on life defies description.
Capt Ron

Canton, MI

#11 Jul 24, 2010
Can not remember wrote:
I was remembering back when I was a young kid…
Ok, this is for the older crowd to answer. My Parents use to cook something we called fried mush. It was some sort of corn product I'm sure. They purchased it at the store and it was sold in rolls or blocks, I’m really not sure. They sliced it from a roll (?) like sausage and then fried it in a cast iron pan in some oil. Is this the correct name and is this product still being sold at the local stores? Respectful answers are welcomed.
Have you had any luck finding the mush at a store?
Can not remember

Elizabethtown, KY

#12 Jul 24, 2010
I really haven't had time to look yet. Most of my grocery trips are short and sweet these days. Have you located mush in a store?
Capt Ron

Canton, MI

#13 Jul 25, 2010
Can not remember wrote:
I really haven't had time to look yet. Most of my grocery trips are short and sweet these days. Have you located mush in a store?
Not yet.
Can not remember

Mammoth Cave, KY

#14 Jul 29, 2010
I wish one of the local places like OK Country Cooking would offer it on the menu.
Kat

Milwaukee, WI

#15 Oct 14, 2012
Capt Ron wrote:
<quoted text>
Have you had any luck finding the mush at a store?
I know that as of a few years ago a company in Wisconsin made it. I am from Wisconsin but found it at a publix in Florida!
Wondering

Tampa, FL

#16 Oct 15, 2012
Is this the same as polenta? It is often used on Food Network. You buy it in a roll, slice it and sauté it.
gawd nooo

AOL

#17 Oct 16, 2012
scuttlebutt says that just maybe,...
the ' circle r' will soon put it back on the menu
yummy!
Known Fact

Cape Canaveral, FL

#18 Dec 12, 2012
I can remember my Mon and Dad talking about what they called mush. I am 75 yrs old it was before my time. My folks lived on a farm in Virginia and they grew a lot of corn and pretty much had to live on it. They made mush (corn meal gravy for breakfast)They had a milk cow for milk and butter and chickens for eggs. they grew cane to make molasses. Oh and they made moonshine from the corn too.I guess on the farm my folks had it better than city dwellers. That is all I know of corn meal mush.
me me

Columbia, KY

#19 Dec 12, 2012
bulldog gravy is made out of frying ham and pouring coffee in it.it aint made with cornmeal
me me

Columbia, KY

#20 Dec 12, 2012
country ham and pour coffee in it. it is so delicious ive ate it plenty of times.

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