Saturated Fat Affects More Than Your ...

Saturated Fat Affects More Than Your Cholesterol

There are 19 comments on the Kansas City InfoZine story from May 30, 2006, titled Saturated Fat Affects More Than Your Cholesterol. In it, Kansas City InfoZine reports that:

By Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN - Recent studies remind us that the goal of eating less fat should focus on saturated fat.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Kansas City InfoZine.

David Brown

Kalispell, MT

#1 Jun 3, 2006
I am a nutrition science analyst. Experimental evidence I'm familiar with indicates that it is the corresponding level of supportive nutrients that determines what level of saturated fat can be safely consumed. A rat experiment by Naimi, S., et al, published in the Journal of Nutrition, 86:325, 1965, demonstrated that a high butter diet (65 percent of total calories) "did not produce changes in blood cholesterol nor result in cardiovascular lesions, as other data had led them to expect." In this particular experiment, animals consumed "20 percent protein (casin) and generous vitamin and mineral supplements..."
The authors concluded, "We are confident that other dietary factors did protect these rats, and that only in the absence of sufficient supportive nutrients are obesity and high fat and high cholesterol diets associated with atherosclerosis and heart disease in the human population."
The above material is quoted from the references and notes at the back of "Nutrition Against Disease" by Roger J. Williams, PhD. The corresponding text found on page 81 reads, "No discussion of heart disease would be complete without mention of the question of saturated fats. It has come to be almost an orthodox position that if one wishes to protect oneself against heart disease, one should avoid eating saturated (animal) fats. While this idea may not be entirely in error, it is misleading in its emphasis. The evidence shows that high fat consumption, when accompanied by plenty of the essential nutrients which all the cells need, does NOT cause atherosclerosis or heart disease."
Heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and many other disease can be either caused or agrivated through failure to supply all of the biochemicals required for body building and tissue repair. In other words, including significant amounts of "empty" calories of any sort (fat, sugar, starch, alcohol), calories that do not have sufficient nutrients needed for energy release and waste removal, causes the body to use up stores of biochemicals that could have been used to support proper brain function, digestion, immune system maintenance, etc.
A more recent comment by Dr. Laura Corr published in the European Heart Journal (1997) 18, 18-22 reads as follows:
"Ask almost any member of the general public about a diet which would reduce their chance of heart disease and the reply is the same:'a low fat diet.' On closer questioning, this means a diet with a reduction in cholesterol and saturated 'animal' fats, i.e. less meat, butter, milk, and cheese. Most national and international recommendations for the prevention of heart disease, whether for promary prevention of or for patients who have developed the clinical manifestations of heart disease, have made dietary restriction of total and saturated fats and cholesterol the primary advice and often the sine qua non (meaning the essential, crucial, or indispensible ingredient without which something would be impossible) in relation to all other forms of management. To this extent they are to be congratulated that the message seems to be so universally accepted. Unfortunately, the available trials provide little support for such recommendations and it may be that far more valuable messages for the dietary and non dietary prevention of coronary heart disease are getting lost in the immoderate support of the low-fat diet." (The fully referenced text of Dr. Corr's article, entitled "The low fat/low cholesterol diet is ineffective," can be viewed at http://www.omen.com/corr.html )
As for me, I have been eating a diet rich in saturated fat since about 1980. At age 59, I take no medications and my cholesterol, at 207, is in the desirable range where the death rate from all causes is lowest. Death rate rises for cholesterol values below 200 and above 240.

David Brown
RAZWELL

Clinton Township, MI

#2 Jun 18, 2006
NO RANDOMIZED TOGHTLY CONTROLLED CLINCIAL TRIAL HAS EVER SHOWN ANY REDUCTION AT ALL IN CVD MORTALITY FROM SATURATED FAT RESTRICTION OR CHOLESTEROL LOWERING
RAZWELL

Clinton Township, MI

#3 Jun 18, 2006
Rick

Las Vegas, NV

#4 Jun 24, 2006
David,
Would mind if I keep a copy of you post and use it elsewhere?
Thanks,
Rick
David Brown

Kalispell, MT

#5 Jun 28, 2006
Rick wrote:
David,
Would mind if I keep a copy of you post and use it elsewhere?
Thanks,
Rick
Hi Rick, Have at it.

Dave
Observer

United States

#6 Jun 28, 2006
David Brown wrote:
I am a nutrition science analyst. Experimental evidence I'm familiar with indicates that it is the corresponding level of supportive nutrients that determines what level of saturated fat can be safely consumed. A rat experiment by Naimi, S., et al, published in the Journal of Nutrition, 86:325, 1965, demonstrated that a high butter diet (65 percent of total calories) "did not produce changes in blood cholesterol nor result in cardiovascular lesions, as other data had led them to expect." In this particular experiment, animals consumed "20 percent protein (casin) and generous vitamin and mineral supplements..."
The authors concluded, "We are confident that other dietary factors did protect these rats, and that only in the absence of sufficient supportive nutrients are obesity and high fat and high cholesterol diets associated with atherosclerosis and heart disease in the human population."
A rat. Think about what you're saying. Humans are not rats.

That's like them claiming that second-hand smoke can kill people. The tests are done on animals. Usually SMALL animals. Well sure, the second-hand smoke is gonna kill these small animals when they're forced to breathe mass quantities of it 24/7.

They need to start doing these tests on HUMANS. Oh, but that would be inhumane. Yet we subject defenseless animals to horrible testing.
Eileen

AOL

#7 Jul 11, 2006
I've been on a Low carb diet for over three years, have lost 60 lbs, reduced my blood pressure and cholesteral to normal limits. Nobody can tell me that low fat diets work. If they did, people would stay on them and we'd all be thin. Take a look around you - everybody is fat! The food pyramid is a sham.
Observer

United States

#8 Jul 11, 2006
Carbs don't make you fat. Excess calories make you fat. You can count carbs and fat and protein till you're blue in the face, but it boils down to calories. Most carby foods have lots of calories. When you reduce carbs you reduce calories.

However, high fat diets don't necessarily make you fat as long as you're taking in fewer calories than your body needs. But if you eat high fat, you gonna have a higher risk of heart disease, whether you lose weight or not.

You can't do just low fat. You have to do EVERYTHING in moderation and take in fewer calories than your body burns.
Diva

AOL

#9 Aug 1, 2006
DON'T KNOW IF ANY OF YOU PEOPLE HERD OF THE BOOK, EAT RIGHT FOR YOUR BLOOD TYPE..NOW YOU WOULD BE SURPISE THE FOOD THAT YOU HAVE BEEN EATING THAT HAS BEEN MAKEING YOU GAIN WEIGHT .IT IS NOT A DIET IT'S EATING RIGHT FOODS FOR YOUR BLOOD TYPE
David Brown

Tendoy, ID

#10 Aug 18, 2006
Observer wrote:
Carbs don't make you fat. Excess calories make you fat. You can count carbs and fat and protein till you're blue in the face, but it boils down to calories. Most carby foods have lots of calories. When you reduce carbs you reduce calories.
However, high fat diets don't necessarily make you fat as long as you're taking in fewer calories than your body needs. But if you eat high fat, you gonna have a higher risk of heart disease, whether you lose weight or not.
You can't do just low fat. You have to do EVERYTHING in moderation and take in fewer calories than your body burns.
It's not that simple. Each of us is physiologically and biochemically unique. Some are sensitive to caloric intake. Others are not.
When you think about it, the digestive system exists outside the body. Swallow a hard object and it passes out with fecal matter a day or so later. Likewise, few or many calories of energy pass through the digestive tract without being absorbed.
Researchers in Africa have measured up to 60 percent calorie excretion. In the USA with our low fiber intake, the average caloric absorption is estimated at 80 percent.
Life is not fair. There are people who love to eat but gain weight easily because their digestive tracts are extremely efficient at breaking down and absorbing calories. Others, who love to eat, cannot gain weight no matter what because they, likely, have fewer receptor sites or less absorptive surface area in their gut. I'm one of those. If I eat a lot, I simply have more bowel movements.
David Brown

Tendoy, ID

#11 Aug 18, 2006
Observer wrote:
<quoted text>
A rat. Think about what you're saying. Humans are not rats.
That's like them claiming that second-hand smoke can kill people. The tests are done on animals. Usually SMALL animals. Well sure, the second-hand smoke is gonna kill these small animals when they're forced to breathe mass quantities of it 24/7.
They need to start doing these tests on HUMANS. Oh, but that would be inhumane. Yet we subject defenseless animals to horrible testing.
Good point. Scientists generally don't test saturated fats on humans for fear that arteries will instantly clog and the subjects will experience heart attacks. Just kidding!

A recent experiment conducted in Australia and published in the August 15, 2006 issue of the "Journal of the American College of Cardiology" involved a comparison of saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat. Unfortunately, saturated-fat-phobic scientists interpreted the results backwards. They learned that the hi-unsaturated fat meal increased the sort of HDL cholesterol that fights inflammation more than did saturated fat. Quoting from the conclusion, "Consumption of saturated fats reduces the anti-inflammatory potential of HDL... In contrast, the anti-inflammatory activity of HDL improves after consumption of polyunsaturated fat."
Actually, the opposite of reduces is increases, not improves. So read that, "... the anti-inflammatory activity of HDL increases after consumption of polyunsaturated fat." Why the increase? Is it because polyunsaturated fat tends to produce inflammation and the body responds by producing more HDL with anti-inflammatory properties? If this be the case, seems to me, for this portion of the research at least, the finding was interpreted backwards.

To conclude this, if consensus of opinion is the proper test for truth, I'm in grave peril because I've been consuming a diet high in saturated fat for more than two decades. If, however, experimental science and experience have validity, I've little to worry about. My body mass index is 19.

David Brown
Kalispell, MT
Ratfink

Perth, Australia

#12 Oct 15, 2006
I know plenty of humans rats. But your comments are ridiculous. but if you really believe in what you say, why not put your hand up and volunteer. There is plenty of other reseach going on too. What about bubonic Plague, HIV, Cancer, I'm sure they would find something to inject you with.
Ratfink

Perth, Australia

#13 Oct 15, 2006
I know plenty of Humans that would fall into the category of a Rat. But "Observer" should put his or her hand up and volunteer to take the place of the rat. I'm sure the reseachers would find something to inject, like HIV,Cancer Cells, Bubonic Plague and stuff.
Observer

Mcdonough, GA

#14 Dec 4, 2006
Ratfink wrote:
I know plenty of Humans that would fall into the category of a Rat. But "Observer" should put his or her hand up and volunteer to take the place of the rat. I'm sure the reseachers would find something to inject, like HIV,Cancer Cells, Bubonic Plague and stuff.
Your comments are just plain cruel.

How do you know I don't already have a disease like cancer? And for that matter, how could wish something like that one someone?

My comments were sincere and not at all cruel and unjust or directed at anyone in particular.
Annie

Missoula, MT

#15 Dec 11, 2006
How do you become a nutrition science analyst??
What are your credentials?
David Brown

Tendoy, ID

#16 Feb 8, 2007
Annie wrote:
How do you become a nutrition science analyst??
What are your credentials?
One becomes a nutrition science analyst by comparing conflicting explanations and studying the data (evidence) supplied by the people who formulate them. When no data is available, the explanation likely has no merit.

I am an autodidact. I have no credentials. Nutrition science analyst is merely descriptive of what I do.
Truth Teller

Wembley, UK

#17 Nov 21, 2014
FAT DOESN'T MAKE YOU FAT - REFINED CARBOHYDRATES DO!
ADA 2014

Romeoville, IL

#19 Dec 16, 2014
This article is being reviewed by the food investigation department.
BAIRD26081988

London, UK

#20 Oct 18, 2015
Saturated fat DOESN'T cause heart disease. The scare was based on a biased and faulty study, the Seven Countries Study, which scientist Ancel Keys produced in the 1950s. He deliberately omitted France and the Inuit countries which ate a very high fat diet and had extremely low rates of heart disease. Similarly, he left out nations whose diets were very low in saturated fat yet had a high incidence of heart disease.
How can margarine for example, which is GREY before it's dyed yellow, be healthier than a natural product like butter or lard?

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