State questions dual-credit courses a...

State questions dual-credit courses amid budget woes

There are 7 comments on the El Paso Times story from Feb 26, 2011, titled State questions dual-credit courses amid budget woes. In it, El Paso Times reports that:

Fifteen students in the Ysleta Independent School District received both high-school and college credit for their dance class.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at El Paso Times.

Kelley

Norcross, GA

#1 Feb 27, 2011
Where is the "academic value" in any class identified in the story?

There is none.

What a waste of our tax money.
whatever

Austin, TX

#2 Feb 27, 2011
just give the dual credit for history English all science classes
Sancho

El Paso, TX

#3 Feb 27, 2011
Everything is not all about reading and math. We teach the structure of the essay: intro, body, and conclusion, but in real life this type of essay is never read in magazines, journals, or professional writing.

We only use it in college writing. But yet we teach it and demand all students adhere to it. We teach Algebra to all students; 6 credits of college algebra, yet we never use algebra in real life. Unless you are an engineer or a math teacher, algebra is not a skill we use everyday. But yet we teach it and force students to learn it. Why?

We dance and move and play all of our lives. We dance to celebrate our victories and we sing and let the music take us far away for a few moments of mirth and bliss. We dance to the gods and with our mates, who sway and swivel and gyrate their torsos in tune to some ancient and lost mating ritual. We dance to feel alive, to feel our inner spirit pose and posture.

There are too many fat people in this world. More people need to do exercise, dance, and jump around. Just yesterday I witnessed a horrific spectacle when a 300 pound woman swayed her enormous behind and "danced" to "I gotta feeling" by the Black Eyed Peas.

I got the feeling that this is something that no innocent child should ever have to see. It was frightening and at the same time stupefying. It sent chills down my spine. Because I knew that naked, that dancing woman would be a horrendous sight.

Since: Jul 10

El Paso, TX

#4 Feb 27, 2011
The early college campuses do not offer athletics so I can see where dual credit would be a great option if there is advanced level of teaching that is not done on a regular campus. Getting credit otherwise is a waste of time and money. EPISD is pushing dual credit rather than AP because it saves money. A lot of it is done online and does not require a campus instructor. But when given a choice a lot of students would take the AP route or have an instructor teaching. It is not as black and white as seems. PE in college to me was fun and great way to stay in shape, meet new people, and learn some advanced techniques. This is where it should stay. The dual credit in sports is way to keep students enrolled in the sports classes so they can receive credit for graduation. A lot of students are not receiving credit for sports after the first 2 years. This can problem can be addressed in the different ways.
Student

El Paso, TX

#5 Feb 27, 2011
I am a result of Dual Credit education, and I credit my academic progress mainly because of these courses. When I entered into UTEP I was prepared and knew what to expect from my instructors. I was grateful to have these classes in high school because the school funded the tuition to pay for it. With Dual Credit, I learned that no one but myself would watch over my academic progress which is what they do in a university or college. I took an AP Government class in school as well, passed the class but not the test, and did not get college credit. I had to spend extra money for this class just to take a test that I did not pass. I ended up taking this class in college and got an A. What does that speak of the AP program that teachers push? Dual Credit has a 70 and above, you receive credit regardless. I got a 90-something in AP and my hardwork was not rewarded in college. Because of Dual Credit, I entered into the college scene with 18 credit hours that meant I had finished a semester and a half. Because of dual credit, I am graduating early by a year. Because of dual credit, I was comfortable with the pressures of college. Because of dual credit, I became interested in pursuing my education. Because of dual credit, I'm a Presidential Scholar, Dean's List Student and going to graduate with honors in my GPA. I credit these courses with the building blocks towards my future. I don't see how these are bad for schools, if a student is capable of performing in the college level, they should be allowed to take these courses a bit early.

Since: Jul 10

El Paso, TX

#6 Feb 28, 2011
Student wrote:
I am a result of Dual Credit education, and I credit my academic progress mainly because of these courses. When I entered into UTEP I was prepared and knew what to expect from my instructors. I was grateful to have these classes in high school because the school funded the tuition to pay for it. With Dual Credit, I learned that no one but myself would watch over my academic progress which is what they do in a university or college. I took an AP Government class in school as well, passed the class but not the test, and did not get college credit. I had to spend extra money for this class just to take a test that I did not pass. I ended up taking this class in college and got an A. What does that speak of the AP program that teachers push? Dual Credit has a 70 and above, you receive credit regardless. I got a 90-something in AP and my hardwork was not rewarded in college. Because of Dual Credit, I entered into the college scene with 18 credit hours that meant I had finished a semester and a half. Because of dual credit, I am graduating early by a year. Because of dual credit, I was comfortable with the pressures of college. Because of dual credit, I became interested in pursuing my education. Because of dual credit, I'm a Presidential Scholar, Dean's List Student and going to graduate with honors in my GPA. I credit these courses with the building blocks towards my future. I don't see how these are bad for schools, if a student is capable of performing in the college level, they should be allowed to take these courses a bit early.
Dual credit was good for you. The point of this action is that some school districts were using dual credit to give credit in sports. Credit is only given for PE for 1.5 semesters and they were trying to find a way to continue to give credit for say "staying in football" This is what is being questioned. Dual credit form great instructors is good. But some online courses do not meet the rigor of the classroom. I have taught at the university level, the course I am teaching now. It was not a community college but a large university. It it meets college standards then go for it. A study by Texas A&M showed students that took AP Statistics performed better on the same test than their freshman counterparts at A&M. That is why they grant a 2 credit. What you learned in Government translated to the course in college. I have this happen so many times. One student told me that without a hard AP course in Chemistry, she never would have received that A in college.
Aldol

Cambridge, MA

#7 Feb 28, 2011
Student wrote:
I am a result of Dual Credit education, and I credit my academic progress mainly because of these courses. When I entered into UTEP I was prepared and knew what to expect from my instructors. I was grateful to have these classes in high school because the school funded the tuition to pay for it. With Dual Credit, I learned that no one but myself would watch over my academic progress which is what they do in a university or college. I took an AP Government class in school as well, passed the class but not the test, and did not get college credit. I had to spend extra money for this class just to take a test that I did not pass. I ended up taking this class in college and got an A. What does that speak of the AP program that teachers push? Dual Credit has a 70 and above, you receive credit regardless. I got a 90-something in AP and my hardwork was not rewarded in college. Because of Dual Credit, I entered into the college scene with 18 credit hours that meant I had finished a semester and a half. Because of dual credit, I am graduating early by a year. Because of dual credit, I was comfortable with the pressures of college. Because of dual credit, I became interested in pursuing my education. Because of dual credit, I'm a Presidential Scholar, Dean's List Student and going to graduate with honors in my GPA. I credit these courses with the building blocks towards my future. I don't see how these are bad for schools, if a student is capable of performing in the college level, they should be allowed to take these courses a bit early.
Perhaps this actually showcases the dichotomy of AP classes and Dual Credit, such that many of our students are being lulled into the sense that dual credit is the best means but it is not. Rather than encouraging them to pursue the harder of the two most choose to get by on dual credit, which is often times a computer based course as opposed to working with an actual instructor, to get credit that is only useful at EPCC or UTEP. Yes, this is a good, and guaranteed way to get credit if you plan to stay in El Paso, but why shouldn't we be telling them to work beyond that. For anyone who chooses to study outside of El Paso that miraculous dual credit becomes a hindrance, most colleges will not grant you credit for it even in Texas, a few exceptions being the UTs. Instead they will tell you to take the AP test, and with good reason. It may be hard, but that is what real college classes are supposed to be like, if not even harder, and you have to show that you have the proper preparation to handle it and get credit for it. In my humble opinion, we need to improve the quality of AP classes, fund the tests better for students, and help them wise up to the harsh reality of dual credit's applicability.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

College Station Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Looking for an old friend (Mar '11) Apr 19 Asherville 5
Woodys Boutique Apr 17 Tank 2
Swingers (Sep '17) Apr 10 austincpl 2
what gangs are active in west Bryan and north B... (Feb '16) Mar 30 collegestation890 9
News Snook Volunteer Fire Chief & Alleged Girlfriend... (Sep '13) Mar '18 Seven eleven 2
Aggies 73 friars 69 Mar '18 Thomas 1
katherine d. smith-spirit mom? (Oct '16) Feb '18 Jessica 5

College Station Jobs

Personal Finance

College Station Mortgages