Messianic Jews say they are persecute...

Messianic Jews say they are persecuted in Israel

There are 72039 comments on the Newsday story from Jun 21, 2008, titled Messianic Jews say they are persecuted in Israel. In it, Newsday reports that:

Safety pins and screws are still lodged in 15-year-old Ami Ortiz's body three months after he opened a booby-trapped gift basket sent to his family.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Newsday.

Voluntarist

United States

#60857 Oct 19, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
http://www.salon.com/2013/05/02/alex_jones_co...
Alex Jones: Conspiracy Inc.
Conspiracy theories can be big business. Here's how the multi-platform entrepreneur makes his millions
----------
"......Jones’ company broadcasts around the clock from his state-of-the art, 7,600-square-foot radio and TV studio that employs 15 people and cleared $1.5 million in revenue in 2009, according to a Texas Monthly profile. But a lot has changed since then. In 2011, he launched the Infowars Nightly News TV program to anchor his new subscriber TV network, which has expanded its lineup as traffic to his websites and general visibility has exploded, meaning his revenue is probably much bigger than it was just four years ago.....
.....So let’s go back to the scoreboard and try to add up our inexact, educated guesstimate into a grand total. On the very low end, we’d estimate a little over $1 million for Web,$215,000 for radio, and $1.5 million for paid subscribers for a not-too-shabby $2.7 million a year. On the high end, if we assume he pulls in the maximum $6 million on Web, another $450,000 on the radio (if his ad rates are at the top of their possible window), and he has 2.5 percent of his website visitors paying to subscribe, then we’re talking about more than $10 million a year. And none of this includes book sales, merch, speaking tours, promotional tie-ins, book and DVD royalties or any other revenue streams that might exist...."
Your point?

JOEL THUMBS UP

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#60858 Oct 19, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>

In the US it is quite common these days to have farmer markets set up within the urban areas. We can also buy organic produce in many regular supermarkets as well.

India would be wise to learn from us.
Organic foods should also be free of genetic modification.

Here, the more knowledgeable organic farmers have small pesticide free farms and follow certain creative kinds of growing produce which involve subjecting plants to certain ancient forms of classical music that're devoted to creating a fusion of mind-matter in the plants by generating harmonious rhythms...

In the smaller cities, farmers set up markets of fresh produce in urbanized areas selling fresh farm produce at extremely cheap rates - less than 1/4 a US dollar for a kg of any farm fresh produce.

In Bhubhaneshwar, Puri and Auroville and a few other places in India, I have seen the freshest and the most amazing array of farm fresh produce - greens, peppers, fruits, nuts, tubers, roots, edible, flowers, spices and grains bursting with life force and great beauty and the taste was wonderful, truly wonderful - I have not seen such a sight nor tasted such produce in any other market in the world that I have visited.

Markets in the bigger cities in India have a lot of catching up to do.

JOEL THUMBS UP

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#60859 Oct 19, 2013
Hugh,

Where are you?

I am going to a 24/7 coffee shop - Trattoria in the Taj Vivanta.

Bye.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60860 Oct 19, 2013
JOEL THUMBS UP wrote:
<quoted text>
Organic foods should also be free of genetic modification.
Here, the more knowledgeable organic farmers have small pesticide free farms and follow certain creative kinds of growing produce which involve subjecting plants to certain ancient forms of classical music that're devoted to creating a fusion of mind-matter in the plants by generating harmonious rhythms...
In the smaller cities, farmers set up markets of fresh produce in urbanized areas selling fresh farm produce at extremely cheap rates - less than 1/4 a US dollar for a kg of any farm fresh produce.
In Bhubhaneshwar, Puri and Auroville and a few other places in India, I have seen the freshest and the most amazing array of farm fresh produce - greens, peppers, fruits, nuts, tubers, roots, edible, flowers, spices and grains bursting with life force and great beauty and the taste was wonderful, truly wonderful - I have not seen such a sight nor tasted such produce in any other market in the world that I have visited.
Markets in the bigger cities in India have a lot of catching up to do.
In the US, certified organic includes nonGM, as well as a host of sustainable farming practices (i.e. its not just pesticide-free).

Heirloom produce is another frontier here as well. As well as locally grown (which may or may not be organic). There is an entire foodie movement with people called locovores.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60861 Oct 19, 2013
Voluntarist wrote:
<quoted text>
Your point?
Think harder. I know its tough.

“Act Interdimensional ly”

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#60862 Oct 19, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
In the US, certified organic includes nonGM, as well as a host of sustainable farming practices (i.e. its not just pesticide-free).
Heirloom produce is another frontier here as well. As well as locally grown (which may or may not be organic). There is an entire foodie movement with people called locovores.
I used heirloom seeds in my garden for two reasons -- they're reusable, unlike hybrids. And they typically come in a greater variety of breeds than the hybrids.
yehoshooah adam

Denver, CO

#60863 Oct 19, 2013
Rick Moss wrote:
<quoted text>
I used heirloom seeds in my garden for two reasons -- they're reusable, unlike hybrids. And they typically come in a greater variety of breeds than the hybrids.
rabbee: and if you use the seeds of any hybrid, you are most likely going to get some pretty crappy and disappointing results. but of course, splicing climbing roses on to an apple tree was kind of cute.

“Act Interdimensional ly”

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#60864 Oct 19, 2013
yehoshooah adam wrote:
<quoted text>
rabbee: and if you use the seeds of any hybrid, you are most likely going to get some pretty crappy and disappointing results. but of course, splicing climbing roses on to an apple tree was kind of cute.
It appears you don't know any more about gardening than you do about Judaism.

Allow me to "educate" you. Hybrids and Heirlooms are both cross-pollinated and are produced exactly in the same manner, natural cross-pollination of like species.

The term hybrids is normally applied to commercially produced seeds that are often sterile in the next generation, rendering the seed unusable for replanting. Commercial hybrids are bred specifically to produce uniform results and disease resistance. This allows farmers and gardeners to get consistent results and not have to put such an emphasis on rotating planting areas. The sterility of the seeds is also a commercial benefit because the gardener must continuously purchase new seed. However, breeding for taste and appearance are not a priority as they don't really effect commercial viability.

Heirloom seeds are also commercially cross-pollinated (although many gardeners do it as a hobby) and are typically not sterile so the seeds can be reused over several generations. The goal of heirloom cross breeding is to improve taste and appearance (I have raised chocolate brown tomatoes for example) with less emphasis on uniformity or disease resistance. I was successfully able to raise tomatoes in hot, humid Singapore (hard to do) by using heirlooms developed for growth in the deep South and Hawaii.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60865 Oct 19, 2013
Rick Moss wrote:
<quoted text>
I used heirloom seeds in my garden for two reasons -- they're reusable, unlike hybrids. And they typically come in a greater variety of breeds than the hybrids.
They also taste nothing like even the best store grown produce. In a league of their own.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60866 Oct 19, 2013
yehoshooah adam wrote:
<quoted text>
rabbee: and if you use the seeds of any hybrid, you are most likely going to get some pretty crappy and disappointing results. but of course, splicing climbing roses on to an apple tree was kind of cute.
I have an apple tree in my yard that has 4 different types of apples on it.
Voluntarist

United States

#60867 Oct 19, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
Think harder. I know its tough.
Infowars.com is a news site just like msnbc.com
except Alex Jones doesn't alter video footage like Rachel Maddow

JOEL THUMBS UP

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#60868 Oct 20, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>

In the US, certified organic includes nonGM, as well as a host of sustainable farming practices (i.e. its not just pesticide-free).
Heirloom produce is another frontier here as well. As well as locally grown (which may or may not be organic). There is an entire foodie movement with people called locovores.
Organic foods should have the following characteristics -

1) Non-GM

2) Pesticide free

3) Soils should be well aerated and enriched using compost/cow dung/vermiculture.

4) Plants should be non-hybrid types unless cross pollination with compatible organic/natural types takes place.

5) Sowing/watering/composting/har vesting operations should be done manually using locally available labor.

6) Produce should be stored in containers made of organic/natural materials like clay/mud, straw, leaves, jute, bamboo, wood, etc, and organic preservatives like the leaves of neem and tulsi or turmeric pods, etc, should be placed in the containers with the produce/grains.

7) Farms should be irrigated using seasonal rainwater or using well water/ground water drawn from from the organic field itself that has been tested for contaminants.

8) Plants may subjected to soulful strains of instrumental/vocal classical music with proven therapeutic/mood uplifting effects.

PS:

The specialty stores that I frequent here stock local organic produce as well as food stuffs from the best organic farms from around the world.

In many ways, I find the local organic produce superior in taste, feel, appearance, texture and health-giving properties than the foreign organic foods.

Besides, I find the local animal breeds like cows, goats, etc more benign, more natural, more soothing to look at and their milk better tasting and more beneficial than the animals and dairy that I have seen and tasted abroad and which are available in the specialty stores here.

Is it that the vibes of a place, its ancient culture based on sublime mind-matter teachings and the aura of the people who handle the stuff serve as contributing factors in making me notice these stark differences between local produce, local animals and local dairy and their foreign counterparts?- I think so.

I prefer staying and eating food at a simple villagers house than in any of the 5 star hotels in India and abroad - many villagers here use organic principles a lot in their every day life and they mostly live in lush green surroundings in clean houses where the emphasis is on soothing traditions, hygiene, respect for elders, eugenic practices sans incest/inbreeding/hypogamy, and loving and harmonious family atmosphere where divorce, pre-marital/extra-marital sex and provocative dressing are shunned. They make use of very little plastic and use a lot of traditional materials like earthen/copper jars to store water, bronze plates for eating, bio-gas for cooking, etc.

These fundamental differences are very clear to my consciousness.

JOEL THUMBS UP

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#60869 Oct 20, 2013
The CAMBRIAN EXPLOSION is the Big Bang of Biology - in a relatively short time span, the major phyla emerged fully formed. Could this indicate what I have been saying all along - that life forms are graded materializations of typal principles that inhere in the universal conscious energy fields? Otherwise, how does one explain the short time period of the Cambrian Explosion during which the major phyla emerged fully formed? Evolutionary forces of the epigenetic kind have shaped how these phyla showed variations since the Cambrian Explosion as each species sought to manifest its intrinsic sentient and material potential that has resulted in the kind of living creatures that we see now everywhere around us and which includes man. All scientific talk of how sentience arose from insentient matter and of how all the lifeforms evolved from a single sentient cell over billions of years by gene variation and natural selection are in most ways paradoxical and illogical.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60870 Oct 20, 2013
JOEL THUMBS UP wrote:
<quoted text>
Organic foods should have the following characteristics -
Certified organic in the US is much more complicated and comprehensive. See http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ams.fetchTemp...

Thats said, the organic paradigm has some serious flaws, the most most obvious being its ideological rigidity against pesticides.
A better approach (in my opinion) which is is also more science based is Integrated Pest Management - which allows a limited amount of pesticide usage provided that there is scouting and monitoring beforehand, and the setting up of pest tolerance levels before pesticide usage.

The IPM movement by far has resulted in a MUCH larger decrease in the use of pesticides worldwide than the organic movement

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60871 Oct 20, 2013
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/factsheets/ipm....

What is IPM?
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is an effective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management that relies on a combination of common-sense practices. IPM programs use current, comprehensive information on the life cycles of pests and their interaction with the environment. This information, in combination with available pest control methods, is used to manage pest damage by the most economical means, and with the least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment.
The IPM approach can be applied to both agricultural and non-agricultural settings, such as the home, garden, and workplace. IPM takes advantage of all appropriate pest management options including, but not limited to, the judicious use of pesticides. In contrast, organic food production applies many of the same concepts as IPM but limits the use of pesticides to those that are produced from natural sources, as opposed to synthetic chemicals.
Top of page

How do IPM programs work?

IPM is not a single pest control method but, rather, a series of pest management evaluations, decisions and controls. In practicing IPM, growers who are aware of the potential for pest infestation follow a four-tiered approach. The four steps include:

Set Action Thresholds
Before taking any pest control action, IPM first sets an action threshold, a point at which pest populations or environmental conditions indicate that pest control action must be taken. Sighting a single pest does not always mean control is needed. The level at which pests will either become an economic threat is critical to guide future pest control decisions.

Monitor and Identify Pests
Not all insects, weeds, and other living organisms require control. Many organisms are innocuous, and some are even beneficial. IPM programs work to monitor for pests and identify them accurately, so that appropriate control decisions can be made in conjunction with action thresholds. This monitoring and identification removes the possibility that pesticides will be used when they are not really needed or that the wrong kind of pesticide will be used.

Prevention
As a first line of pest control, IPM programs work to manage the crop, lawn, or indoor space to prevent pests from becoming a threat. In an agricultural crop, this may mean using cultural methods, such as rotating between different crops, selecting pest-resistant varieties, and planting pest-free rootstock. These control methods can be very effective and cost-efficient and present little to no risk to people or the environment.

Control
Once monitoring, identification, and action thresholds indicate that pest control is required, and preventive methods are no longer effective or available, IPM programs then evaluate the proper control method both for effectiveness and risk. Effective, less risky pest controls are chosen first, including highly targeted chemicals, such as pheromones to disrupt pest mating, or mechanical control, such as trapping or weeding. If further monitoring, identifications and action thresholds indicate that less risky controls are not working, then additional pest control methods would be employed, such as targeted spraying of pesticides. Broadcast spraying of non-specific pesticides is a last resort.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60872 Oct 20, 2013
Voluntarist wrote:
<quoted text>
Infowars.com is a news site just like msnbc.com
except Alex Jones doesn't alter video footage like Rachel Maddow
"news" site?

Come on.

Wake up - all you are doing is making the guy more rich. Dobt be a lemming.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60873 Oct 20, 2013
Rick Moss wrote:
<quoted text>
It appears you don't know any more about gardening than you do about Judaism.
Allow me to "educate" you. Hybrids and Heirlooms are both cross-pollinated and are produced exactly in the same manner, natural cross-pollination of like species.
The term hybrids is normally applied to commercially produced seeds that are often sterile in the next generation, rendering the seed unusable for replanting. Commercial hybrids are bred specifically to produce uniform results and disease resistance. This allows farmers and gardeners to get consistent results and not have to put such an emphasis on rotating planting areas. The sterility of the seeds is also a commercial benefit because the gardener must continuously purchase new seed. However, breeding for taste and appearance are not a priority as they don't really effect commercial viability.
Heirloom seeds are also commercially cross-pollinated (although many gardeners do it as a hobby) and are typically not sterile so the seeds can be reused over several generations. The goal of heirloom cross breeding is to improve taste and appearance (I have raised chocolate brown tomatoes for example) with less emphasis on uniformity or disease resistance. I was successfully able to raise tomatoes in hot, humid Singapore (hard to do) by using heirlooms developed for growth in the deep South and Hawaii.
I was going to ask how you garden in Singapore. My stereotype of your island nation is that you live on the 20th floor of a high rise, and that the only green space for gardening is way out on the periphery. And that you are too far for Burpee.

JOEL THUMBS UP

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#60876 Oct 20, 2013
typo

THAT the US guidelines haven't a clue about

“Act Interdimensional ly”

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#60877 Oct 20, 2013
Frijoles wrote:
<quoted text>
I was going to ask how you garden in Singapore. My stereotype of your island nation is that you live on the 20th floor of a high rise, and that the only green space for gardening is way out on the periphery. And that you are too far for Burpee.
I live in what they call locally a "semi-d". Which is one of two townhouses with a common wall. Each of us has a driveway, carport and a garden area. Tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers and other non-tropical plants need to be covered with shadecloth to keep them from overheating. The high humidity means everything needs to be treated with anti-fungals.

I did live in a highrise for a while. I tried growing tomatoes and lettuce on the balcony, but it took me a while to get the right seed, light, soil combination to grow tropical tomatoes.

Thai basil, on the the other hand, thrives here and I grow potatoes in straw-filled tubs. Because of my limited space, I only grow things that I eat right away and buy the foods I could normally can.

“Legumes of the World Unite ”

Since: Sep 11

Location hidden

#60878 Oct 20, 2013
JOEL THUMBS UP wrote:
<quoted text>
Organic foods should have the following characteristics -
To provide you with an example of ideological rigidity (and its impractical consequences) that you might appreciate:

In my state of Connecticut, they passed a law recently banning the use of Phosphorus fertilizers on lawn for most cases. Nutrient loading of the Long Island Sound and dead zones is a big deal here, and they are trying to reduce this.

So lawn care products with P are generally not available anymore.

However, it turns out that since compost has high Phosphorus levels, by law, compost is now banned from lawns as well (not that most people know this)

Banning of compost on lawns is collateral damage to the emerging Organic Lawn Care industry which relies on compost applications. A lot of landscaping businesses went organic over the last few years and now their practices are technically illegal under the new law to ban fertilizers.

Ironically, I can understand the ban, as it doesnt matter what the source of P is, it all affects the plantlife the same way. Plants dont really care if their source of P is synthetic or organic, they incorporate the P as inorganic regardless.

However, organic sources of P are generally more environmentally friendly due to the slow time it takes to convert the P to inorganic.

I dont think the intent of the law was to put organic lawn care landscapers out of business.

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