Cause determined in death of Chico St...

Cause determined in death of Chico State coed

There are 65 comments on the Chico Enterprise-Record story from Jan 7, 2010, titled Cause determined in death of Chico State coed. In it, Chico Enterprise-Record reports that:

Police have disclosed the cause of a Chico State University student's death on Oct.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Chico Enterprise-Record.

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methprevention

Oroville, CA

#1 Jan 7, 2010
To Whom It May Concern,

Five Chico State University students have died from prescription, illicit or over the counter drug overdoses between August 24, 2006 & October 06, 2009.

During that same period in Chico two other students died from prescription, illicit or over the counter drug overdose. This brings the student total of prescription, illicit or over the counter overdose deaths in Chico during this period to seven.

At this rate in Chico every five and a half months a student dies from prescription, illicit or over the counter drug overdose.

At several meetings starting in April of the Town & Gown Committee comprised of Chico State University administration, students and Chico City Council members including the Mayor I addressed the issue. I wrote letters in the Chico ER.

Specifically one week prior to the death of Gina Marie Maggio I had personally warned the Town & Gown Committee of the current rate of student deaths caused by prescription, illicit or over the counter drug overdoses in Chico with little interest expressed regarding my concerns.

After several months hearing these facts and rate of student drug overdose deaths in Chico at no time did any individual from Chico State University, Chico City Council or Town & Gown Committee find this information worthy of discussion, intervention or alarm.

They were warned prior to Gina Maire Maggio's death and did very little to nothing to intervene regarding student deaths in Chico from prescription, illicit or over the counter drug overdoses.

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#2 Jan 7, 2010
Thank you methpervention, thank you very much for taking the time to address this issue with this post.
Drugs "meth" are not good when left illegal were criminals profit and prey on helpless people. Chico has a problem with it. CSUC has a problem with it. It is to bad our mayor and the city counsel would not discus the problem with you.

Since: Dec 08

United States

#3 Jan 7, 2010
stephens1949 wrote:
Thank you methpervention, thank you very much for taking the time to address this issue with this post.
Drugs "meth" are not good when left illegal were criminals profit and prey on helpless people. Chico has a problem with it. CSUC has a problem with it. It is to bad our mayor and the city counsel would not discus the problem with you.
I was wondering what would happen when both sides of the spectrum on drugs meets. You know the meth guy's solution is to hunt down everyone involved with these drugs that facilitated this death and put them in prison for manslaughter. Stephens has a more pragmatic approach of drug legalization and spending current enforcement money on drug treatment. Have I got that right guys?

Can those positions be reconciled?
Good Lord

Long Beach, CA

#4 Jan 7, 2010
You can talk about how bad drugs are all day long. You're not telling anybody anything they don't already know. The fact of the matter is, if people want to do drugs, they are going to find them and do them. Just because something is illegal does not make it unobtainable. Everyone, yes EVERYONE, is aware that drugs are bad and that they pose a risk to your health and well-being. However, people CHOOSE to ignore this. They must live (or not live) with their choices.
Biden4President2 010

United States

#5 Jan 7, 2010
Who supplied the drugs; could it be the CSUC health center?

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#8 Jan 7, 2010
Good Lord wrote:
You can talk about how bad drugs are all day long. You're not telling anybody anything they don't already know. The fact of the matter is, if people want to do drugs, they are going to find them and do them. Just because something is illegal does not make it unobtainable. Everyone, yes EVERYONE, is aware that drugs are bad and that they pose a risk to your health and well-being. However, people CHOOSE to ignore this. They must live (or not live) with their choices.
Will you please think of some thing to call yourself other than the "Good Lord". I know you really do not think you are the Good Lord but for it to be used as a handle here to make comments using your opinion with it in hopes of getting others attention seems stupid. It is not that I give a rats a** about "the" "Good Lord", it is that you are just making yourself into someone who is irritating, to me anyway.
Now what is it that makes you say drugs are a bad thing? The only bad thing about drugs is that I run out and they are illegal. And inorder for me to get more I must humble myself to others who want to profit off of my needs. And the truth is they are not good people even if they paid some one to certify that they are a drug dealer.
methprevention

Oroville, CA

#9 Jan 7, 2010
Out of seven dead students maybe just maybe you might think some one at the very least would have been found as a person of interest in providing the drugs that killed these kids.

Good Lord were you aware that prescription drugs today kill 16,000 a year. This has become a national epidemic that political leaders, FDA and pharmaceutical industry want no one to hear.

The students today are as dumb as posts about the harmful fx of prescription and illicit drugs. Class II opiates are so addictive after taking one dose of a prescription of 30 pills unknowingly you can easily become addicted and not able to stop and many doctors hand them out like candy.

Many doctors have pharmaceutical reps in and out of their offices more than patients. Pushing these drugs on patients is very beneficial for these doctors because the more drugs they push for these pharmaceutical reps the more, vacations, air travel and other bribes they receive.

Yeah drugs are bad only an idiot could disagree, but it's just not that simple. The majority of the general public are completely blind regarding the enormous complexities of why 22,400 people die each year from all types of drug overdoses.

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#10 Jan 7, 2010
pypr wrote:
<quoted text>
I was wondering what would happen when both sides of the spectrum on drugs meets. You know the meth guy's solution is to hunt down everyone involved with these drugs that facilitated this death and put them in prison for manslaughter. Stephens has a more pragmatic approach of drug legalization and spending current enforcement money on drug treatment. Have I got that right guys?
Can those positions be reconciled?
Pypr, I do not give a rats a** about funding drug treatment. If someone wants to medicate himself let him do it. I disagree making drugs illegal so government politicians and civil services can have a job and make a profit off of there illegality. That includes the judges, the lawyers the, the jailers, the doctors the nurses, the social workers, the court clerks, the dealers, the growers, the makers, all of them.
methprevention

Oroville, CA

#11 Jan 7, 2010
Hey ER & Chico Police you can keep taking this information off these threads and I will keep putting it back on. I understand the public will be upset when they find out about seven deaths that you immediately knew the cause of death and did not release that information or begin an investigation.

When victims of an opiate overdose often exhibit specific characteristics. For example, victims may have a “foam cone,” tinged orange or red with blood, around their nostrils and mouth, the most common characteristic of such an overdose. Opiates act as a central nervous system depressant, causing a decrease in heart rate and breathing. This slowing causes fluids to gather in the lungs, inhibiting the life-sustaining exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Essentially, victims drown in their own pulmonary fluids. As the fluids gather, victims may expel some mixed with gas bubbles, which then forms the foam cone. Autopsies of opiate overdose victims often reveal that death resulted from pulmonary edema, a swelling of the lungs with a pooling of fluids inside them.2
Because of this lack of oxygen, extremities, as well as the lips and tongue, frequently turn blue. Pupils may be constricted to a pinpoint.

Since: Dec 08

United States

#12 Jan 7, 2010
stephens1949 wrote:
Pypr, I do not give a rats **** about funding drug treatment. If someone wants to medicate himself let him do it. I disagree making drugs illegal so government politicians and civil services can have a job and make a profit off of there illegality. That includes the judges, the lawyers the, the jailers, the doctors the nurses, the social workers, the court clerks, the dealers, the growers, the makers, all of them.
Stephens, sorry about that. I mistakenly mixed you up with the other poster who you wanted me to read. He lead me to the policies that Spain and Portugal have regarding the decriminalization and legalization of drugs. That's were treatment comes in. I in fact [including recent education efforts] agree more with your position on drugs. If they are made legal, I don't want to spend the money we save on drug treatment. I say use at your own risk and as long as the user doesn't become a burden on society or a threat to public safety, they should be responsible for their own decisions about what they ingest and the manor of their deaths.
Common Sense

Chico, CA

#13 Jan 7, 2010
"Out of seven dead students maybe just maybe you might think some one at the very least would have been found as a person of interest in providing the drugs that killed these kids."

The official response to all of these incidents has been "what a shame, what a waste, let's move on".

If someone had been shooting these kids the outcry would have been thunderous.

If the University and lots of revenue from students weren't involved the outcry would have been thunderous.

The University wants the public relations nightmare to go away, the City Council wants it to go away, police not wanting unsolved cases on their hands want it to go away. The drug dealers want it to go away because it is bad for business.

It is so much easier to say it was an accident and that's the way things are and people are going to do this and it can't be stopped.

Until it is recognized as a crime it will just continue with each crop of new students.
Good Lord

Long Beach, CA

#14 Jan 7, 2010
stephens1949 wrote:
<quoted text>Will you please think of some thing to call yourself other than the "Good Lord". I know you really do not think you are the Good Lord but for it to be used as a handle here to make comments using your opinion with it in hopes of getting others attention seems stupid. It is not that I give a rats **** about "the" "Good Lord", it is that you are just making yourself into someone who is irritating, to me anyway.
Now what is it that makes you say drugs are a bad thing? The only bad thing about drugs is that I run out and they are illegal. And inorder for me to get more I must humble myself to others who want to profit off of my needs. And the truth is they are not good people even if they paid some one to certify that they are a drug dealer.
I couldn't care less what you think of my handle...or you lack of understanding it. "Good Lord" is an interjection, not a title of divinity. Your posts hardly ever make sense or consist of a logical thought pocess--THAT is annoying. Not to me, but most all of us. Get the hell over yourself. Twit.
Good Lord

Long Beach, CA

#15 Jan 7, 2010
Common Sense wrote:
Until it is recognized as a crime it will just continue with each crop of new students.
Drug dealing is a crime.
Good Lord

Long Beach, CA

#16 Jan 7, 2010
methprevention wrote:
The students today are as dumb as posts about the harmful fx of prescription and illicit drugs.
That is their problem. Everyone has access to an education--and everybody gets drug education in school. Everyone. If you buy the ticket, you take the ride. If you are willing to ingest a drug, knowing that their are potential health risks, you accept the consequences. Being dumb is not an excuse. And if it is, then it's Darwinism at its finest. We don't need people procreating who cannot grasp this concept.

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#17 Jan 7, 2010
pypr wrote:
<quoted text>
Stephens, sorry about that. I mistakenly mixed you up with the other poster who you wanted me to read. He lead me to the policies that Spain and Portugal have regarding the decriminalization and legalization of drugs. That's were treatment comes in. I in fact [including recent education efforts] agree more with your position on drugs. If they are made legal, I don't want to spend the money we save on drug treatment. I say use at your own risk and as long as the user doesn't become a burden on society or a threat to public safety, they should be responsible for their own decisions about what they ingest and the manor of their deaths.
Pypr, you are making some good sense here. I hope when and if people see us agreeing your credibility is not damaged.
Common Sense

Chico, CA

#18 Jan 7, 2010
"Drug dealing is a crime"

Crime in name only.
Drugs are pervasive at CSUC among students and faculty. Most students there can get you anything you want within minutes. It may be a crime in the handbook but I doubt any student has ever been arrested on campus for dealing. Can't have that mucking up the low crime statistics.

“Budget Deficit $1 Trillion”

Since: Jun 09

Chico

#19 Jan 7, 2010
Did you know there are 3 murders per year?
54 rapes?
73 Robberies?
132 assaults?
3148 property crimes?

2 per year is hardly noteworthy.

I think our limited funds are put to far better use.

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#20 Jan 7, 2010
Good Lord have mercy.
Your post #16 makes a lot of sense, like pypr in post 12. Now I am excited. It goes to show that the liberals (that being CSU) our governor wants to give more money to are "choking" us literally to death.

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#21 Jan 7, 2010
Common Sense wrote:
"Drug dealing is a crime"
Crime in name only.
Drugs are pervasive at CSUC among students and faculty. Most students there can get you anything you want within minutes. It may be a crime in the handbook but I doubt any student has ever been arrested on campus for dealing. Can't have that mucking up the low crime statistics.
Students come to Chico State for the drugs. And that is the image that its administrators do not want to tarnish. And our mayor hopes will feed her greedy stupidity.
Good Lord

Long Beach, CA

#22 Jan 7, 2010
stephens1949 wrote:
Good Lord have mercy.
Your post #16 makes a lot of sense, like pypr in post 12. Now I am excited. It goes to show that the liberals (that being CSU) our governor wants to give more money to are "choking" us literally to death.
I'm pretty damn liberal, Stephens.

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