674 Gaston School employees wonder if...

674 Gaston School employees wonder if they'll have jobs...

There are 33 comments on the www.gastongazette.com story from Jun 9, 2009, titled 674 Gaston School employees wonder if they'll have jobs.... In it, www.gastongazette.com reports that:

"I told them I do them I'd do everything I can to bring them back," Grimmer said.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.gastongazette.com.

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#1 Jun 9, 2009
Here is what you have to wonder, its a lot of teachers getting the ax, if so then how can they teach their classes without them?

See where my logic is going? maybe not all were needed cuts but some of them were.

The schools had a good run without too many people putting pressure on budgets cause of the bubble economy and its bubble tax revenues.

Party's Over.

GCS schools has a average class size of around 18-22 a class. A few more on top of this ain't gonna make any difference in any of the other performance measures.

Class size NEEDS to become irrelevant and IT CAN with improvements in process and technology.

Thy Bard already has the plan in the hole sweetpeas.

No need to worry.

“:)”

Since: Aug 08

Belmont, NC

#2 Jun 9, 2009
This is HORRIBLE!!!

How is this possible for them to cut so many? Am i the only one that has a problem with this?

One, I have NO IDEA where they are coming up with the K-3rd grade class sizes to increase to 26 and 4-5th to increase to 32 per teacher. How is that possible...Look at Forest Heights for example, they have a staff of 51 and 20 teachers have received non-renewal letters. Of those 20 employees there are:
1 kindergarten teacher
3 first grade teachers
2 second grade teachers
4 third grade teachers
3 fourth grade teachers
3 fifth grade teachers
1 fourth/fifth grade combo teacher
1 media specialist
1 reading teacher
1 art teacher

Now, they are losing almost half of their staff, but class sizes are only expected to increase by an average of two students??? How???

Belmont schools (Page Primary, Belmont Central, North Belmont, Belmont Middle, and South Point) have a total of 47 teachers on the list!!!!!

Is it necessary to loose all these teachers? Can't we cutback in other ways?

For starters, let's eliminate some of the asst. principals at Gaston County high schools, do we need one for each grade? I only had 1 principal and 2 assts. when i was in high school and we survived, just fine. Yes, i am sure there is more of a work load associated, but we could save a tremendous amount of money in those salaries alone.
Another idea... Last week my child had to bring her belongings home from school. She brought home a 692 page Math book, a 153 page math practice workbook, and 2 different practice books(phonics/grammar/spelling /etc.), that are each about 180-200 pages each. Whatever happened to the hard back books that the school would keep? Why does each child get to keep their books...each one of these were hardly written in. This is wasteful! I can understand if it were a history book, they need to be updated frequently, but math...1st grade math...that is not something that should be updated regularly..GCS should revert back to hardback reusable books. I would be more than happy to supply paper, in order to keep teachers.

I am praying for all the teachers. Without teachers we would be nothing!

"Teaching is the profession that teaches all the other professions." ~Author Unknown

Since: Mar 09

Belmont

#3 Jun 9, 2009
What if....

What if the county schools system only laid off teachers so they could draw unemployment over the summer months, since summer school will not be in session due to budget cuts... just food for thought.

I agree, teachers should not be cut. Cut administrators, cut admin salaries, cut sports, but don't cut teachers.

“:)”

Since: Aug 08

Belmont, NC

#4 Jun 9, 2009
here's another thought....

[email protected]

start emailing your disapproval ;)

“:)”

Since: Aug 08

Belmont, NC

#5 Jun 9, 2009
"FOR NORTH CAROLINA, EDUCATION IS THE PRIORITY: Even as we search out ways to cope with our deteriorating economic landscape, we must be sure to protect our most precious asset -- our children, our future workers. So we must find ways to be inventive and engaging in the way our schools work and students learn. We must, as the saying goes, "not eat our seed corn," but continue to move forward on education to keep North Carolina competitive in the global market place.

And yes, even in these tough times... we will increase per-pupil spending in our public schools.

And while we will hold schools, teachers and students accountable, we will bring some sanity to North Carolina's own testing mania by eliminating duplicative or unnecessary tests.

I have reorganized our public schools, with Bill Harrison becoming both the CEO of the State Board of Education and of the Department of Public Instruction -- adding accountability and clear direction to a system badly in need of both.

And, as we make sure our schools perform, we must expect no less from all our citizens. No child has permission to drop out of school in North Carolina and no teacher has permission to give up on a student. No parent has a free pass from their responsibility to be fully involved in their child's education.

And no segment of our community, particularly our business community, gets a free pass on education. Our business leaders put a lot of energy into making sure North Carolina's tax rate is competitive. These leaders need to put the same effort into helping North Carolina be the home of the nation's best educated workforce.

And we will begin my College Promise to remove financial barriers for access to higher education. In this global economy, education beyond high school is not a luxury... it's a necessity.

My efforts create a pathway, starting in pre-kindergarten that offers courses of study that fit students' needs -- all the way through vocational, community college, or college. Seamless learning, pre-K through 20, that's the goal.

And North Carolina will use technology to modernize the classroom and enable teaching to catch up with the way our kids live. Let's face it, today's students show up at school with more technology in their pockets and backpacks than they find in their classrooms. For too many students, they ignore what's on the blackboard while they are busy "tweeting" on Twitter. I see some of you doing that right now.

North Carolina's Virtual Public High School will ensure that any kid in any high school can take any class he or she needs. This levels the education playing field for students and assures educational equity. "

Sounds nice doesn't it? It was copied from Bev Perdue's State of the State speech on March 9, 2009...... So protecting "our most precious asset" means cutting 647 teachers in one county, huh, who would have thought?!
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#6 Jun 10, 2009
belmontboy wrote:
What if....
What if the county schools system only laid off teachers so they could draw unemployment over the summer months, since summer school will not be in session due to budget cuts... just food for thought.
I agree, teachers should not be cut. Cut administrators, cut admin salaries, cut sports, but don't cut teachers.
No can do.
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#7 Jun 10, 2009
They are not "laying off" all these teachers. They are letting them know some will not come back. The teacher contract process is a bit unique. My understanding is the bulk of these teachers will be renew but in August. It gives the schools some "wiggle" room.

I do not believe they will wind up with class sizes of 30 or better.

An increase in some class size will probably happen.

It is a necessary process and it probably would not be effective without a little human pain. The realities of the business world and they are a business to the extent of working within budgets.

My key is always classroom size. Teacher to student contact (the legal kind) is the single most important link in the education chain.

BUT, they have never tried anything other than build more schools to combat this ratio as in decreasing class size. It is a dog chasing his tail especially when it comes to the increasing burdens of being in a high growth area.

Teacher productivity has not been significantly impacted EVER. I have never read or seen anything of significance in increasing actual productivity.

Basically we have the same system that existed 150 years ago.

We obviously do not live in that world anymore.

Education needs to be re-engineered.

A true maxim reached in how a teacher teaches their students.

It is here, it exists, it is the answer and ITS FREE. Does not cost a thing to implement, no billion here or a million there government spending is needed. AS in true productivity increases actually decrease the cost of providing the service.
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#8 Jun 10, 2009
The reason?

The MONEY IS IN building more schools and allowing the activity that necessitates more building.

The money is not in actually educating a child, its in increasing budgets by increasing students then increasing budgets by increasing more students, as in increasing budgets by increasing students.

Dog chasing tail. No wonder they seem to be so frustrated.
justsayin

Charlotte, NC

#9 Jun 10, 2009
Most of these teachers will be hired back. The first four years in Gaston County are probationary and each probationary teacher always has to sign a contract every year.
Usually the state can tell the school systems how much money they'll have for teachers by this time of year. This year is different. The state is still working on the budget and can't tell the school system how much they can have.
Once the budget is passed most (probably not all) of these teachers will be hired back.

Your best bet for to help out is to contact your legislators not GCS. GCS is waiting on the state.
Once the budget is settled, then and only then, can GCS decide who and where to cut.

Right now: Contact your legislator.
After the budget: Contact your school board member.

Don't bother calling Reeves...he's not an elected official. The legislators and school board members want to be reelected....tell them you won't vote for them if the cut teacher positions and pay.
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#10 Jun 10, 2009
Won't work, they can't do anything for you on a individual basis.

This is something that IS painful but needed.

Yes, they are not addressing the middle management positions as much as needed as Jenni said, but they have took care of some of it.

All in all, our administrators are NOT totally asleep at the wheel.

The teachers not contracted back can find a job within a week. The profession is not burdened with lack of demand.

Guess what? It ain't over. This is the first cut. NEXT YEAR WILL BE WORSE.

The system is getting primed for a re-engineering. Teachers today will not be doing the same things the same ways in a few years, sooner than you think.

True change is coming.

“:)”

Since: Aug 08

Belmont, NC

#11 Jun 10, 2009
Jennifer Queen wrote:
here's another thought....
[email protected]
start emailing your disapproval ;)
I emailed him last night, along with david phillips...here is the response I received from Reeves McGlohon:

Ms. Queen,

Thank you for your thoughts on the budget problems we face in Gaston County. It is helpful to hear from parents and receive their ideas. Let me respond to some of the points in your e-mail.

First, we will cut a number of assistant principal positions as a result of budget reductions. In addition, we anticipate cuts in central office administration, building level administration, transportation, supplies/materials and athletics. We anticipate exploring all possible budget cuts in order to lessen the impact on classroom teachers. However, given the size of our cuts and the fact that classroom teachers make up the bulk of our budget - it will be impossible to avoid some cuts in teaching positions.

We also anticipate a significant cut in textbooks - leaving us with an issue of how to provide adequate textbooks for our students. This reduction will, in fact, delay future textbook adoptions at both the state and local levels.

I will certainly join you in your prayers for our teachers and agree that they are the most important individuals in our education process. Please know that we will continue to work to keep as many teachers working with our children as possible.

Reeves McGlohon
Superintendent
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#12 Jun 10, 2009
As I said, they are doing the right things. Unfortunate, but the real world can be when it gets out of control as we have witnessed the past year.

But the economics of the cuts are sound and they are not necessarily a bad thing. They are hitting the areas that need to be hit, but the core teaching staffs need to be protected.

Look at the school websites. Look at the faculty pages. The staffs are top heavy and many positions are non-core subjects. At least half of the personnel in schools are not core teaching positions.

Bottom Line: A lot of the stuff they have IS NOT needed. Business courses? Not really, it has little to do with preparing graduates for the workplace after high school without college degrees.

Reading, Writing and Arithmetic.

It is xactly what they should be doing and not much more.

In the business world after a run of growth, you start trimming the excesses built up during the growth period. The point being is the tendency to deviate from CORE FUNCTIONS will be costly and these are the costs that need to be trimmed when the growth slows,

Very similar to a bank that gets into all kinds of businesses during a growth period and they forget to dance with the products that began the growth.

Focus on Core Subjects. Reading, writing and math.

See where I am going? The need to diversify and broaden the curriculum used to be logical before the internet. Now, it is dated. Yes, they went the wrong way on curriculum because they had a "dated" understanding of the real world. Let's face it, educators do not live in the real world, not the one I have survived in.

These kids need them core principles, the core subjects and really not much else. The rest is at the end of a fingertip and their imaginations.

Core subjects, reading writing math science.

You can teach them rocket science but without the core subjects you will wind up with what we got, a bunch of George Bushes.
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#13 Jun 10, 2009
The cuts won't be as bad as they look right now. Its a big game of chicken right now, with the opposing sides trying not to give in on their agendas.

But once, the wrangling has been done, the pressure will ease up.

Now, IN the age of the Internet, WHY DO WE EVEN USE TEXTBOOKS?

Think about it. Is their really a reason, besides friends and colleagues who sell text books.

Bottom Line: You really do not even NEED books, especially if the schools would ensure full integration of the internet with net books which COST THE SAME AS TWO OF THESE TEXTBOOKS.

The school system could just get laptops with the money used on books and SAVE MONEY.

But we all KNOW about the Insider Interests when it comes to the money game of textbooks.
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#14 Jun 10, 2009
Look at South Point.

There are 85 or so staff, not including custodian or cafeteria positions.
The core subjects: English, Science, Math and Social Studies has 39 teaching positions. Half.

Workforce Development? 4 counselors? 2 ROTC? distance learning? 4 asst principals (3 now) 2 media specialists? this is xactly what i am talking about, I mean yeah, some are probably worthwhile but it is a trend that should not be sustained. The cost/benefit just ain't there.

Look I do not see the need for foreign languages or fine arts (?) either but can see some need for them.

And this is all the schools. They got policeman, social workers, and who knows what else.

Get back to performing the core functions. THIS IS WHERE THE SYSTEM IS FAILING.
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#15 Jun 10, 2009
Then once you fix the curriculum, fix the teachers, empower them with technology and then problem solved. All the little problems will disappear once the system truly engages the children.

Case in point, last week the teachers were "given" permission to "go on the internet".

I mean is that ridiculous? It shows where they are in levering technology. It shows xactly the mentality of the system.

What I am saying ain't up for debate. Its reality and its coming.

Two traditional functions and costs of schools has been textbooks and classroom instruction. BOTH ARE OUTDATED and unneeded.
They are resource wasters, and they detract from the goals of educating the children.

Where is the real problems in school performance? High Schools mainly. I wonder why?
Wine Head

Cherryville, NC

#16 Jun 10, 2009
We need teachers not coaches,south point we do not need all the coaches you have.What does jason do but coach baseball,football,Lay him off and his daddy. How many do they have for football.They do not win so why have them.We don't need 5 assistnt principal at sp.Give me a break.I wish i could get paid to sit in the weight room,When real teachers do not have a job.
just asking

Charlotte, NC

#17 Jun 10, 2009
I know that state employees, including teachers, had a 1% pay cut.
justsayin

Charlotte, NC

#18 Jun 10, 2009
Speaking of textbooks...

Every 5 years my subjects get new textbook adoptions. That may make sense in some upper level science classes but my subjects just don't change that often.

Additionally, my textbooks have online versions and consumable workbooks so I really only need once class set to use. However, during my two rounds of adoptions I tried to only get 35 books and individual workbooks. They MADE me order a textbook for every single student.

I do NOT issue the books to each student. They get the workbooks they can write in, most have online access and I give handouts. I use 30 of the books while the rest sit on the shelves with the spines unbroken.

The last year of the adoption I will issue them, allow the kids to highlight and make notes in them and then send them home with them.

It's a waste. We could do new adoptions every 8 years or so, replacing damaged and lost books and even then only buying class sets for the elementary and middle schools...I've taught both levels...couldn't say about high school. The workbooks are good resources and are often just condensed versions of the books, they save copy costs as well.
Thy Bard

Charlotte, NC

#19 Jun 10, 2009
justsayin wrote:
Speaking of textbooks...
Every 5 years my subjects get new textbook adoptions. That may make sense in some upper level science classes but my subjects just don't change that often.
Additionally, my textbooks have online versions and consumable workbooks so I really only need once class set to use. However, during my two rounds of adoptions I tried to only get 35 books and individual workbooks. They MADE me order a textbook for every single student.
I do NOT issue the books to each student. They get the workbooks they can write in, most have online access and I give handouts. I use 30 of the books while the rest sit on the shelves with the spines unbroken.
The last year of the adoption I will issue them, allow the kids to highlight and make notes in them and then send them home with them.
It's a waste. We could do new adoptions every 8 years or so, replacing damaged and lost books and even then only buying class sets for the elementary and middle schools...I've taught both levels...couldn't say about high school. The workbooks are good resources and are often just condensed versions of the books, they save copy costs as well.
Xactly!

And it has been so for some time. The other fight is the entrenchment of the "dinobrains" sitting in their crusty chairs forming the curriculum. It is the "golden chalice" of the state school system. It is and has been so for why? yes, virginia they are that diabolical, for if you control the minds you can make more money and there will be less static and a more "ordered" society.

Just in case the aliens decide to come down.

It will be the most difficult of yokes to shed from the chains of tyranny.

But I can assure, its gonna happen. It will be invoked by creativity and results. A result is the truth of the education and the only goal is student involvement. Who cares what they learn as long as they're learning. Engagement.

Also, with this aspect will come parental involvement or at least more so, not perfect but a drastic change from present. Its about one thing: Accessibility. Access to information.

TO some degree the students will become the teachers.
CheerMom

United States

#20 Jun 12, 2009
I think they should change the name of the North Carolina Education Lottery to the State's Vacation Fund! Our schools were fine when there was no lottery, now that we have one; it has helped NOTHING.Somebody somewhere is using this money.Children are the future, they will be running this country someday, education is a must!!!It's simple math, if half of the teachers are gone then each classroom size doubles.It does not make ANY sense at all.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Cherryville Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Do married women like to cheat (Jul '08) Mon Fantasy Island 146
Sheriff retirement Dec 2 pissed off 2
News Gaston College instructor arrested in online te... (Apr '09) Nov 28 Perv hater 11
Trying to contact my son, 34 year old Richard P... Nov 24 ZYX765 1
trying to contact my son Nov 24 ZYX765 1
News Gaston County planning new school in Belmont Up... Nov 19 Shea Shires 1
Ken from Food Lion Nov 16 thischick 13

Cherryville Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Cherryville Mortgages