School calendar control should stay i...

School calendar control should stay in local hands

There are 35 comments on the Asheville Citizen-Times story from Mar 9, 2009, titled School calendar control should stay in local hands. In it, Asheville Citizen-Times reports that:

A couple of bills were introduced in the North Carolina General Assembly last week that acknowledge a reality that seems lost on some state officials.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Asheville Citizen-Times.

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peachcat lvr

Hendersonville, NC

#1 Mar 10, 2009
I think that all public schools should be year round. This would be putting education first. I think that teachers should get the same pay for twelve months as for nine months. I know that we have some good teachers out there but we have many more who do not do enough work to earn a pay check. My husband and I both are retired school teachers.
Jackson County

Cullowhee, NC

#2 Mar 10, 2009
peachcat lvr wrote:
I think that all public schools should be year round. This would be putting education first. I think that teachers should get the same pay for twelve months as for nine months. I know that we have some good teachers out there but we have many more who do not do enough work to earn a pay check. My husband and I both are retired school teachers.
Year round or not, students and teachers have to have a break. There would have to be radical changes in after-school and summer camp programs to help parents who work. Right now, they are set up to accommodate the 9-months on, 3-months off schedule. Getting these places to change is hard.
Who_ me

Spartanburg, SC

#3 Mar 10, 2009
As a parent, I agree that it would be difficult to get used to but I think it would be best for schools to be year round. I believe it would help to have a couple weeks off during flu season and there would not be as much need for catch up work at the beginning of the year. To stay on topic though it only makes sense for the school calendar to be dictated by locals, because we know the weather, and we know whats important to our families, its quite obvious that those in Raliegh and DC have no clue what is most important for us..
peachcat lvr

Hendersonville, NC

#4 Mar 10, 2009
business people work year long with vacations,holidays,etc,there is no reason schools can't do the same.it should be about real education,not someone's convenience.no offense intended,we either believe in education or we don't.there is no in between.
ottogirl

United States

#5 Mar 10, 2009
Allowing tourism to dictate education calendars is one of the most rediculous things we have done in NC.
bumblebee

Fletcher, NC

#6 Mar 11, 2009
i am just curious has to how people feel about the Jackson County school system. I would like to know the good and bad.
Jackson County

Cullowhee, NC

#7 Mar 11, 2009
bumblebee wrote:
i am just curious has to how people feel about the Jackson County school system. I would like to know the good and bad.
Generally I am satisfied but again, nothing is perfect and there is room for improvement in anything. My son is at Cullowhee Valley, which in my opinion, is a cut above the other K-8 schools academically. Of course I sometimes feel that this school is heavily attended by the "rich" kids and they get first dibs on everything, but they have helped me son at times when he needed it or after a few times when I absolutely insisted on it. We live in Fairview district but I refuse to send him there. There are some good teachers there, but my problem with it is the open pod style classroms. This school was built in the 1970s when the pods were the "thing." They have put up partitions but I still don't see how anyone functions there. Scott's Creek from what I hear is a good school and it would be my second choice. I don't know a whole lot about Blue Ridge and I don't hear much good about Smoky Mountain Elementary, but all I know is hearsay. My child isn't yet old enough for Smoky Mountain High, but I hear better things than I used to. I think the new principal has helped. Overall, the system maybe could be a bit stronger academically, but the standings aren't horrible. It is as safe as any school system is these days.
bumblebee

Fletcher, NC

#8 Mar 11, 2009
It will always be who your name is. Yes I will agree I have heard better things about Smoky Mountain, but there is somthing going on with all the drop outs. I think our kids get labled from a very early age and it follows them through the years. It is sad that most of them are local kids to. I think they give up on them way to early. If the kid is having problems at home,(although not always the case!) it should make the system help that kid more, not throw them to the hub! Can't wait to see more responses!!
Jackson County

Cullowhee, NC

#9 Mar 11, 2009
bumblebee wrote:
It will always be who your name is. Yes I will agree I have heard better things about Smoky Mountain, but there is somthing going on with all the drop outs. I think our kids get labled from a very early age and it follows them through the years. It is sad that most of them are local kids to. I think they give up on them way to early. If the kid is having problems at home,(although not always the case!) it should make the system help that kid more, not throw them to the hub! Can't wait to see more responses!!
The dropouts are a problem and the labeling is a problem. For the last few years at Cullowhee Valley, my son has been put in the "middle" group because of test scores, grades, etc. It's better than the "low" group I guess, but I find it interesting that the "high" group is made up mostly of professors and doctors kids. They could be dumber than doorknobs and they'd still be in that group. The teachers and administrators deny grouping the kids this way, but I know better and the kids themselves know better. Who knows, one of these "low" group kids could potentially turn out to be a brilliant scientist or teacher themselves if given the chance.
bumblebee

Fletcher, NC

#10 Mar 11, 2009
I agree with you jackson county, its crazy the way they do things. I have also heard that they tell the "low" group that over half of them will drop out!!!! How do you tell a child that, should they not be positive with them? Encourage them to do better. I better never hear of them telling my child this, but where would I go, Sue Nations, she is a joke and puppet on a string.
Jackson County

Cullowhee, NC

#11 Mar 11, 2009
bumblebee wrote:
I agree with you jackson county, its crazy the way they do things. I have also heard that they tell the "low" group that over half of them will drop out!!!! How do you tell a child that, should they not be positive with them? Encourage them to do better. I better never hear of them telling my child this, but where would I go, Sue Nations, she is a joke and puppet on a string.
They'd better never tell my child that either! The administration can be a joke, although I think the principals at Cullowhee are good. I don't know about the other schools though. The groups should be a blend of students of varying abilities, races and socioeconomic backgrounds.
peachcat lvr

Hendersonville, NC

#12 Mar 11, 2009
Jackson County wrote:
<quoted text>The dropouts are a problem and the labeling is a problem. For the last few years at Cullowhee Valley, my son has been put in the "middle" group because of test scores, grades, etc. It's better than the "low" group I guess, but I find it interesting that the "high" group is made up mostly of professors and doctors kids. They could be dumber than doorknobs and they'd still be in that group. The teachers and administrators deny grouping the kids this way, but I know better and the kids themselves know better. Who knows, one of these "low" group kids could potentially turn out to be a brilliant scientist or teacher themselves if given the chance.
I think it is against the law to group students in this manner that you are referring to.

“Live to Ride, Ride to Live”

Since: Jan 09

Western North Carolina

#13 Mar 11, 2009
Jackson County wrote:
<quoted text>They'd better never tell my child that either! The administration can be a joke, although I think the principals at Cullowhee are good. I don't know about the other schools though. The groups should be a blend of students of varying abilities, races and socioeconomic backgrounds.
This happens in our school system too and we are not in Jackson County.

They put the higher functioning students in one class, the middle students together, and the low students in with the students who receive resource classes.

All children can learn from each other.

It is not a free appropriate education. Which is your child's right to receive.

“Live to Ride, Ride to Live”

Since: Jan 09

Western North Carolina

#14 Mar 11, 2009
peachcat lvr wrote:
<quoted text>
I think it is against the law to group students in this manner that you are referring to.
It most certainly is.

But how do you prove it beyond the obvious?

How do you (as a parent) have the ability to prove it?

The courts usually side with the schools because they are government too.

Since: Nov 08

The Mountains of WNC

#15 Mar 11, 2009
bumblebee wrote:
I agree with you jackson county, its crazy the way they do things. I have also heard that they tell the "low" group that over half of them will drop out!!!! How do you tell a child that, should they not be positive with them? Encourage them to do better. I better never hear of them telling my child this, but where would I go, Sue Nations, she is a joke and puppet on a string.
The public schools are well-known for their demeaning treatment of students. One of my students recently told me that before she graduated from high school, the guidance counselor told her "not to bother" applying to college because she "would never make it." This same student is graduating from college in May, with honors! I have heard similar stories from many other students. It seems that many of these public school teachers and counselors go out of their way to denigrate students in an attempt to keep them "under control." Rather than encouraging kids to do their best, this public school bunch seem to take great delight in keeping kids down. It's no wonder that many parents are turning to home-schooling.
sylvananny

United States

#16 Mar 11, 2009
there are too many parents that use the school as a babysitter, the send the kids to school sick and then they can't be found to come pick them up. The year round school would be to handy for them.. The kids need a break. Let them enjoy their childhood. We all know to well adulthood is too stressful...
Jackson County

United States

#17 Mar 11, 2009
H_D_Lady wrote:
<quoted text>
It most certainly is.
But how do you prove it beyond the obvious?
How do you (as a parent) have the ability to prove it?
The courts usually side with the schools because they are government too.
It's a funny coincidence to me that the "high" group consists mostly of the professors and doctors kids, the "low" group consists mostly of the blacks and Hispanics, and the rest of us fall into the "middle" group. I guess it's just a reflection of our society. But I've confronted the school a time or two about this and they deny it. It seems pretty obvious to me.

“Live to Ride, Ride to Live”

Since: Jan 09

Western North Carolina

#18 Mar 11, 2009
Jackson County wrote:
<quoted text>It's a funny coincidence to me that the "high" group consists mostly of the professors and doctors kids, the "low" group consists mostly of the blacks and Hispanics, and the rest of us fall into the "middle" group. I guess it's just a reflection of our society. But I've confronted the school a time or two about this and they deny it. It seems pretty obvious to me.
You are 100% correct.

When 12 kids out of one classroom are being pulled out for resource (at different times during the day) it is more than VERY obvious!

You are right about the doctors & lawyers too.

Not to mention the PTO volunteers either. They rank right up there too!

I have to work for a living. I pay my PTO dues every year, come to the meetings, participate in their continuous fund raisers (and volunteer my time at the ones held after 5:00), and the very fact that I cannot be at school half a day, every day changes all of that!

I used to volunteer daily to open car doors for the kids in the car rider line. I did this for 3 years until I got disgusted with the "uppity snobby moms", and had to start fighting the school to get my kids physical needs met.

At that point, it was no longer satisfying to me, so I stepped away.

I feel that we are all created equal.

We all put our pants on the same way. One leg at a time.

Since: Nov 08

The Mountains of WNC

#19 Mar 11, 2009
Jackson County wrote:
<quoted text>It's a funny coincidence to me that the "high" group consists mostly of the professors and doctors kids, the "low" group consists mostly of the blacks and Hispanics, and the rest of us fall into the "middle" group. I guess it's just a reflection of our society. But I've confronted the school a time or two about this and they deny it. It seems pretty obvious to me.
Jackson, it is not obvious to me that a professor's kid, or a doctor's kid necessarily belongs in the the "high" group. That's an erroneous assumption that the schools apparently make. The point is that it depends on the "motivation" of the student, not who his or her parents are or where they are employed. If schools are distributing kids based on their parents' employment, then a massive mistake is being made all around!
Bumblebee

Fletcher, NC

#20 Mar 12, 2009
Yes I agree with you Wiley Coyote, but it does hold some truth for Jackson County. I also believe that if the kid isn't as motivated, it is up to the "system" to help motivate the kid. Lets say the child is in a bad home situation and the parents don't push the child, should that not come from the "system"? I mean just because this child does not have the motivation, and does not get it from the home he/she does not need to be labeled and placed in a "low" group. I think it is high time that we listen to the students. Who is really there for them? To hear what they have to say about how they are being taught. We automatically listen to the adult in situations, that the child is not "motivated" or can't learn, when it could be the "system" isn't working for them. Maybe they can't learn the way the teacher is teaching them, maybe the teacher can't adjust to the student. I say let the students grade the teachers or even put web cams up so the parents can go and see that their child is behaving and the teacher is teaching the way she should be. I hope that this somehow finds it way to the school board and the new "drop out" person that Jackson County has hired. Its already to late for some of our local kids, but hopefully it will help some of our future ones!

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