Charlottesville Police Department Und...

Charlottesville Police Department Under Review - NBC29 WVIR Charlottesville, VA News, Sports and ...

There are 40 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Sep 10, 2012, titled Charlottesville Police Department Under Review - NBC29 WVIR Charlottesville, VA News, Sports and .... In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

Charlottesville's police force is under the microscope. A team from the Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards Commission is giving the department a full review to see if it makes the grade.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

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Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#23 Sep 11, 2012
Pat wrote:
<quoted text>
Downsides are it costs money to do. Preparation is key to success. All of the things I mentioned earlier in the inspection have to be addressed. Things like Standing Orders and procedures have to be updated and approved, Training needs to be reviewed and updated if necessary, Record keeping needs to be reviewed and changed if needed. Management and leadership goals established and monitored. It takes time and depending upon how much improvement is needed, costs the taxpayers. However, there really is no other effective and comprehensive way to improve a Department. The peer inspections work because the inspectors come from Accredited Departments and giving another Department a pass just cheapens their own work and accomplishments. So the inspections are tough.
Upsides are it improves morale if successful. It gives elected officials something to grade a Department on and justify increased expenditures if warranted. Many Departments report reduced lawsuits for negligence which can be very costly. The process helps to weed out marginal performers both at the leadership and Officer levels. There is a big improvement in preparedness through accreditation. You would be amazed at how many Departments do not have an updated pre-plan for a bank robbery or a kidnapping or other major crime. This process insures that they do, thus saving property and lives. Updated Officer training helps to keep personnel and residents safer by using modern procedures that have been tested for effectiveness and safety around the state and around the country. I'm just scratching the surface here, but from my experience in a town with a Department that stepped up for this, we got a much better Police Department. Well worth the cost.
Thank you, that was helpful and interesting.
Hey Pat

Minneapolis, MN

#25 Sep 11, 2012
How do you know so much about accreditation? That was a pretty impressive write-up.
ex-cop

Harrisonburg, VA

#26 Sep 11, 2012
Pat wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong. Accreditation is voluntary. There are state and national accreditations. Departments are inspected by their peers according to written standards. It includes inspection of equipment and personnel, standing orders and procedures, management and leadership, records and reporting and training programs. Just preparing for accreditation is time consuming and difficult. Once Accredited a department undergoes regular inspections so they maintain the high standards.
If a Department does well (short list of things to work on or improve) it is a morale booster for the entire Department.
The real winners? The residents who have a Department who steps up for this.
No your wrong it doesn't benefit the residents of that jurisdicaiton. what about the cops that plant drugs, make trumped up charges, cops that as juvi had many DUI's but because his daddy was a cop got hired, or the cop who when drunk killed his daughter in a vehicle accident, the cop who's girlfriend filed a protective order and was told to drop it because then he couldn't carry a weapon and lose his job, and on and on the stories I can share. The former police chief that was a sherriff but as a street cop did all the hookers he wanted....... ACCREDIDATION is only paper just like the SOL's,, truly meaningless.
Pat

Wytheville, VA

#27 Sep 11, 2012
Hey Pat wrote:
How do you know so much about accreditation? That was a pretty impressive write-up.
Watched a Department go through the process of State and National Accreditation as a resident of the town. I also volunteered some time automating the Records section and saw the significant amount of work involved in modernizing nearly every facet of operations. They were successful but only because the entire Department made a commitment to do it.
Accredited Departments are in the top tier of Departments in the state and when Nationally Accredited they are in the top tier of Departments in the country. This is good for the career paths of Officers in those Departments who want to apply for higher positions in other Departments. An Accredited Department is also seen as a better place to work and attracts a higher number and level of applicant.
I knew next to nothing about Police work as a resident and learned a number of things as I watched the process of Accreditation as it unfolded. It was a win-win for the Department and the town.
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#28 Sep 11, 2012
Peer review is a great way to get recommendations for improvement. I don't know the cost of this one, and don't have time to follow up, but I expect that it's a good value.

Thanks, Pat for a calm and lucid explanation of what is involved.

In my own dealings with the CPD I have found them to be courteous and professional. They have quickly and thoroughly followed up on problems that I have reported to them. That's my experience, and that's what I go by.
Pat

Wytheville, VA

#29 Sep 11, 2012
ex-cop wrote:
<quoted text>
No your wrong it doesn't benefit the residents of that jurisdicaiton. what about the cops that plant drugs, make trumped up charges, cops that as juvi had many DUI's but because his daddy was a cop got hired, or the cop who when drunk killed his daughter in a vehicle accident, the cop who's girlfriend filed a protective order and was told to drop it because then he couldn't carry a weapon and lose his job, and on and on the stories I can share. The former police chief that was a sherriff but as a street cop did all the hookers he wanted....... ACCREDIDATION is only paper just like the SOL's,, truly meaningless.
There is no magical fix for Police that abuse their job and/or commit illegal acts. But if you think about it, all the things I mentioned as results of Accreditation fight against that.
The reasons why are simple. All the things you mention diminish a Department and make it harder to do their job effectively. Public support, which is crucial for funding and investigations is squandered and a Department will have to work much harder, or fail to perform their functions in a significant way. Public support takes years to build and can be lost in seconds. A Department committed to high standards, that has public support behind them, will not toss that away lightly. They like to get rid of boneheads and bad guys in their ranks more than you do and they are in a position to do it before you even see it.
Ultimately, in my experience, the Chief is responsible. If the Chief can't keep a clean house maybe the elected officials should get someone who can. But if a Chief steps up for Accreditation and all the effort that involves, both initially and ongoing, I find it hard to believe he will not be on top of personnel problems.
Cmon Man

Washington, DC

#30 Sep 11, 2012
Pat wrote:
<quoted text>
There is no magical fix for Police that abuse their job and/or commit illegal acts. But if you think about it, all the things I mentioned as results of Accreditation fight against that.
The reasons why are simple. All the things you mention diminish a Department and make it harder to do their job effectively. Public support, which is crucial for funding and investigations is squandered and a Department will have to work much harder, or fail to perform their functions in a significant way. Public support takes years to build and can be lost in seconds. A Department committed to high standards, that has public support behind them, will not toss that away lightly. They like to get rid of boneheads and bad guys in their ranks more than you do and they are in a position to do it before you even see it.
Ultimately, in my experience, the Chief is responsible. If the Chief can't keep a clean house maybe the elected officials should get someone who can. But if a Chief steps up for Accreditation and all the effort that involves, both initially and ongoing, I find it hard to believe he will not be on top of personnel problems.
Pat,

Very lucid and well stated points, but having dealt on many levels with accreditations in many professions I tend to disagree with several of your points. First, I agree there will be some benefit from this drill, but as you stated it consumes ALOT of time in preperation. I feel this would be better served on the street seeking bad guys (not speeders). Consuming ALOT of TIME is costly, which means it consumes ALOT of our tax dollars on a voluntary drill that ultimately gets no criminals off the street. The morale boost your speak of can only come from the fact that the inane paper drill is over, and the officer can get back to doing his or her assigned job (getting bad guys off the street). Not preparing and keeping metrics and updating policies and operating procedures designed to blow smoke and justify departmental expenditures. I think in a time when we have lots of operating budget to throw around, this might be a nice thing to do. Not sure it is worth the cost during these tight times. But I forgot, all C'ville has to do is go out to rich republican Albemarle county and demand more $ to support their "good feelings" programs. Hmmmmm.
did you hear that

East Lansing, MI

#31 Sep 11, 2012
at the end of the day the chief and sheriff gets ten thousand dollars added to their pay for passing.
Pat

Wytheville, VA

#32 Sep 11, 2012
Cmon Man wrote:
<quoted text>
Pat,
Very lucid and well stated points, but having dealt on many levels with accreditations in many professions I tend to disagree with several of your points. First, I agree there will be some benefit from this drill, but as you stated it consumes ALOT of time in preperation. I feel this would be better served on the street seeking bad guys (not speeders). Consuming ALOT of TIME is costly, which means it consumes ALOT of our tax dollars on a voluntary drill that ultimately gets no criminals off the street. The morale boost your speak of can only come from the fact that the inane paper drill is over, and the officer can get back to doing his or her assigned job (getting bad guys off the street). Not preparing and keeping metrics and updating policies and operating procedures designed to blow smoke and justify departmental expenditures. I think in a time when we have lots of operating budget to throw around, this might be a nice thing to do. Not sure it is worth the cost during these tight times. But I forgot, all C'ville has to do is go out to rich republican Albemarle county and demand more $ to support their "good feelings" programs. Hmmmmm.
Some good points, particularly about the paperwork and the time involved. One negligence lawsuit avoided however usually offsets a lot of it. As to the paperwork, most people in law enforcement don't go into the field to fill out forms and keep track of incident types and totals as you know. One of the real issues with Accreditation is the increased paperwork burden on the middle ranks. That turns the leadership of the Department into pencil-pushers. What most Departments do is computerize from point of dispatch right through to the record rooms. With computers in Police cars these days over 80% of incidents are closed out in the cars with a short description of the resolution. In the past, incident reports were manual and a big time consumer. With automation in the cars the Officers save time and that translates into more patrol hours during a shift, a benefit to resident safety. The other thing that has been experienced is reductions in overtime. Paperwork on a busy shift was often forced to the end of the shift and done on overtime. With computerized dispatch and computers in the cars the overtime is reduced substantially. Also collecting incident information as it happens is more accurate and frees up leadership time to analyse the information and do what they were hired to do which is to lead. Records room staff is reduced as well when records are computerized. These savings to the taxpayer are substantial as well.
One other benefit of computerized dispatch and record keeping as well as computers in Police cars is important to Officer safety. When an Officer responds to an incident he has access to the prior history at that address. Having an inkling of what to expect is very helpful when approaching a potentially violent situation. In a traffic stop situation computers in police cars linked to state DMV and national criminal databases assist the Officer in avoiding potential deadly confrontations. I don't know that I can calculate the dollar value of that, but I imagine for the Officer and their families it is off the scale.
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#33 Sep 11, 2012
Like a peer is gonna be totally objective in their findings, not likely. Too many officers on Cville's PD have violated human rights on citizens here and retained their jobs for this to be a valid venture. Like I said, it will be a rubber stamp, "keep up the good work, we know the averaage citizen is a twerp and deserves no respect but your doing a great job violating every and all human rights". We'll see what the results are, if Longo chooses to volunteer the results and 29 chooses to publish them. Yes, I'm a sinic but mankind gives a plethora of reasons for this.
H8tosay

Charlottesville, VA

#35 Sep 12, 2012
Final results in October?
How about now: Assault, burglary, vandalism, etc. are not being reduced under the current force. Tougher police force management required.
Pat

Wytheville, VA

#36 Sep 12, 2012
H8tosay wrote:
Final results in October?
How about now: Assault, burglary, vandalism, etc. are not being reduced under the current force. Tougher police force management required.
Just curious, but how did you get the statistics and how does it compare to similar areas? Also, relevant is the size of the department and the size and makeup of the population. FBI used to publish this 10 years ago, but it was "convinced" by local jurisdictions that the statistics were hurting the reputation of the local area. I don't agree with that, residents should have the information. People could check out how a local Department was doing against their peers.
Drug use and corresponding gang activity fueled by it have gone up in the last 5 years. A University town like C'ville is a prime target for this kind of activity. I know Albemarle needs more Officers in the Patrol section. I wonder if C'ville is underfunded there too? I don't question your assertion, but how did you reach that conclusion?
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#37 Sep 12, 2012
Talk about blowing smoke, its getting deep in here. A perfect example of why nothing gets done about crime other than to talk about it. We now have gangs in Cvile and whats being done about that?, as usual nothing but talk.
Pat

Wytheville, VA

#38 Sep 12, 2012
thinking free wrote:
Talk about blowing smoke, its getting deep in here. A perfect example of why nothing gets done about crime other than to talk about it. We now have gangs in Cvile and whats being done about that?, as usual nothing but talk.
You're just finding out there are gangs in C'ville? How often do you come out from under your rock, every 10 years?
wimps

Harrisonburg, VA

#39 Sep 12, 2012
Pat wrote:
<quoted text>
You're just finding out there are gangs in C'ville? How often do you come out from under your rock, every 10 years?
no gangs in cville. juast crap for police department s to keep expanding
H8tosay

Charlottesville, VA

#40 Sep 12, 2012
Pat wrote:
<quoted text>
You're just finding out there are gangs in C'ville? How often do you come out from under your rock, every 10 years?
Patrick or Patricia (or both)
I believe "thinking free" meant noting a relatively significant increase in gangs, not that they have just been discovered. 10 years ago there weren't that many news items concerning gang activity. Now, gang related activity is a common occurence, and getting worse - both in frequency and severity of the crime.
We need to nip this trend before it permanently ruins our communities.
Hint to Police Dept.:
Hispanics account for about 50% of all gang members, Blacks 30%, Whites 15%, and Asians 5%. That % may vary depending on the data you pull, but proportionally that's about it.

H8tosay

Charlottesville, VA

#41 Sep 12, 2012
Pat wrote:
<quoted text>
Just curious, but how did you get the statistics and how does it compare to similar areas? Also, relevant is the size of the department and the size and makeup of the population. FBI used to publish this 10 years ago, but it was "convinced" by local jurisdictions that the statistics were hurting the reputation of the local area. I don't agree with that, residents should have the information. People could check out how a local Department was doing against their peers.
Drug use and corresponding gang activity fueled by it have gone up in the last 5 years. A University town like C'ville is a prime target for this kind of activity. I know Albemarle needs more Officers in the Patrol section. I wonder if C'ville is underfunded there too? I don't question your assertion, but how did you reach that conclusion?
That's a fair critique ; you can interpolate the data and stats from spotcrime ; download as cvs and run /apply filters.
Residends DO have this information, in rather high detail.
Or you can live here for 15+ years and notice the trends first-hand.
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#42 Sep 12, 2012
The trend is easy to disseminate, fighting crime is a losing proposition as far as funding levels. Writing speeding tickets and setting up check points are cash cows. Of course we've all heard about the productivity levels pushed on cops to write tickets but in the mean time crack traffic goes unfettered in the city and the county. Like most all things its the bottom line, to heck with the crime. Like I said this is a feel good effort, nothing will change in the fighting crime department unless we get a chief who actually wants to fight crime.
Pat

Wytheville, VA

#43 Sep 12, 2012
H8tosay wrote:
<quoted text>
Patrick or Patricia (or both)
I believe "thinking free" meant noting a relatively significant increase in gangs, not that they have just been discovered. 10 years ago there weren't that many news items concerning gang activity. Now, gang related activity is a common occurence, and getting worse - both in frequency and severity of the crime.
We need to nip this trend before it permanently ruins our communities.
Hint to Police Dept.:
Hispanics account for about 50% of all gang members, Blacks 30%, Whites 15%, and Asians 5%. That % may vary depending on the data you pull, but proportionally that's about it.
Agree about the gangs. This is a growing threat. Chicago took gang activity lightly at first and now have a sky-high murder rate. I wish them luck...
Randy

Charlottesville, VA

#44 Sep 12, 2012
This department is by far one of the best on the East coast. The only thing suffering in this department (much like many departments across the nation) is young, lazy inexperienced patrol officers. After just a few years they believe they are owed and deserving of everything. When they are directed to actually work, they call it micromanagement and over bearing administration. It amazes me how lazy cops really are. They don't have a clue what a hard days work really is. That aside, the success of the department obviously comes from good leadership regardless if the lazy cops like beig told what to do.

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