An idea to end the crack issue in Charleston!

Posted in the Charleston Forum

Lmao

Alexandria, VA

#1 Mar 10, 2013
I wish the state would buy enough crack to fill up a tractor-trailer, place cameras in view of the truck, park it on Central Ave./the Westside of Charleston, open up the doors and walk away!
How long would it take before any action took place? How many murders would happen that day? How long would it take to empty the truck? Lol!!!
jke

Alexandria, VA

#2 Mar 10, 2013
I know this is meant to be a joke, but were you really laughing out loud?
The reason I ask is I'm trying to determine if you're a teenager or just one mentally.
Lmao

Alexandria, VA

#3 Mar 10, 2013
jke wrote:
I know this is meant to be a joke, but were you really laughing out loud?
The reason I ask is I'm trying to determine if you're a teenager or just one mentally.
Nothing has worked on the so called war on drugs, nothing! If anything the war is still raging and worse. So why not go extreme in a totally different yet semi-more controlled way?
Yes it's a sad joke only because many would smoke themselves to death and drug dealers would be clueless for a few moments!
Watchful

Charleston, WV

#4 Mar 10, 2013
Smoke theirselves to death would be a good thing! Keyword "death". Sick and tired of the crime involved with the drugs!
jke

Saint Albans, WV

#5 Mar 10, 2013
Well man, glad to see you would want an intelligent conversation on the subject. You're right, there is no end to the war on drugs, but there never has been. The war on drugs was nothing more than a tax hike. A sham. Mankind has been exploring ways of altering their consciousness since recorded time.
I blame the war on drugs for the drug problem. They make it harder for people to get pseudoephedrine, but there's meth labs everywhere. There's a crackdown on prescription drug use, now heroin is everywhere.
By them doing what they do the price goes up, hence does the crime rate.
I lived in Europe where the laws are less stringent, and there was less abuse and less crime.
Something to consider- and I apologize if I was a dick before.
1 post removed
Nobody

Mooresville, NC

#7 Mar 11, 2013
Hard drugs, yeah. They are bad. Marijuana? Not so much. Alcohol gets you about 1000 times more intoxicated than pot ever could. Alcohol is a factor in most rapes, murders, and domestic violence in this country. Pot is a factor in most potato chip and pizza incidents. To me it is not an issue of protecting the public, the government obviously doesn't give a shit about that or they wouldn't sell us alcohol or cigarettes. Marijuana is not a public health concern. So why is it illegal? Why is a relatively harmless plant such a big deal when they push their liquor, cigarettes, and pills on us every single day? They don't care about us taking drugs, as long as we are taking their drugs. The government hates competition.
Mr Jingles

Charleston, WV

#8 Mar 11, 2013
@LMAO

There's something to what you said

When we have a rat problem in our homes we set a rat trap out and put cheese or peanut butter on it and wait for the varmit to bite down and then *POP**SNAP**CRUNCH* The problem is solved!

Well it's the same way with those crack heads. We should just set up a load of crack somewhere and let them bite on it and then just put those junkies out of their misery.
Lmao

Alexandria, VA

#9 Mar 11, 2013
Mr Jingles wrote:
@LMAO
There's something to what you said
When we have a rat problem in our homes we set a rat trap out and put cheese or peanut butter on it and wait for the varmit to bite down and then *POP**SNAP**CRUNCH* The problem is solved!
Well it's the same way with those crack heads. We should just set up a load of crack somewhere and let them bite on it and then just put those junkies out of their misery.
Exactly!!
sasquatch

Charleston, WV

#10 Mar 11, 2013
Mr Jingles wrote:
@LMAO
There's something to what you said
When we have a rat problem in our homes we set a rat trap out and put cheese or peanut butter on it and wait for the varmit to bite down and then *POP**SNAP**CRUNCH* The problem is solved!
Well it's the same way with those crack heads. We should just set up a load of crack somewhere and let them bite on it and then just put those junkies out of their misery.
LOL!!
WVGirl78

Wharton, WV

#11 Mar 11, 2013
Trust me People..we do not want this drug war to End...then all the dark ones might stay out of prison????
really

Charleston, WV

#12 Mar 11, 2013
WVGirl78 wrote:
Trust me People..we do not want this drug war to End...then all the dark ones might stay out of prison????
what?!?
If there wasn't drug wars there wouldn't be people doing time on such thing. Yes I want this drug war to end!! I have kids. Did you seriously make a statement referring to dark ones?? I hope that wasnot pertaining to someone's race. If so its 2013 GET WITH THE PROGRAM!! ALL the toothless old white Meth heads all over this state are even in the drug war if not more?? & before you come back with a racist comment I am white and so are my children. Stop judging on race we are all Gods children! We don't choose our DNA. SO if your white you didn't make that choice anymore then the black lady sitting next to you@ the dr or the Mexican waiter at a restaurant chose their race. Grow up and stop that ignorant talk
Portugal has got it right

Huntington, WV

#13 Mar 12, 2013
On July 1st, 2001, Portugal decriminalized every imaginable drug, from marijuana, to cocaine, to heroin. Some thought Lisbon would become a drug tourist haven, others predicted usage rates among youths to surge.
Eleven years later, it turns out they were both wrong.
Over a decade has passed since Portugal changed its philosophy from labeling drug users as criminals to labeling them as people affected by a disease. This time lapse has allowed statistics to develop and in time, has made Portugal an example to follow.
First, some clarification.
Portugal's move to decriminalize does not mean people can carry around, use, and sell drugs free from police interference. That would be legalization. Rather, all drugs are "decriminalized," meaning drug possession, distribution, and use is still illegal. While distribution and trafficking is still a criminal offense, possession and use is moved out of criminal courts and into a special court where each offender's unique situation is judged by legal experts, psychologists, and social workers. Treatment and further action is decided in these courts, where addicts and drug use is treated as a public health service rather than referring it to the justice system (like the U.S.), reports Fox News.
The resulting effect: a drastic reduction in addicts, with Portuguese officials and reports highlighting that this number, at 100,000 before the new policy was enacted, has been halved in the following ten years. Portugal's drug usage rates are now among the lowest of EU member states, according to the same report.
One more outcome: a lot less sick people. Drug related diseases including STDs and overdoses have been reduced even more than usage rates, which experts believe is the result of the government offering treatment with no threat of legal ramifications to addicts.
While this policy is by no means news, the statistics and figures, which take years to develop and subsequently depict the effects of the change, seem to be worth noting. In a country like America, which may take the philosophy of criminalization a bit far (more than half of America's federal inmates are in prison on drug convictions), other alternatives must, and to a small degree, are being discussed.
For policymakers or people simply interested in this topic, cases like Portugal are a great place to start.
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/portugal-drug-...
shoehorn

Daniels, WV

#14 Mar 12, 2013
Portugal has got it right wrote:
On July 1st, 2001, Portugal decriminalized every imaginable drug, from marijuana, to cocaine, to heroin. Some thought Lisbon would become a drug tourist haven, others predicted usage rates among youths to surge.
Eleven years later, it turns out they were both wrong.
Over a decade has passed since Portugal changed its philosophy from labeling drug users as criminals to labeling them as people affected by a disease. This time lapse has allowed statistics to develop and in time, has made Portugal an example to follow.
First, some clarification.
Portugal's move to decriminalize does not mean people can carry around, use, and sell drugs free from police interference. That would be legalization. Rather, all drugs are "decriminalized," meaning drug possession, distribution, and use is still illegal. While distribution and trafficking is still a criminal offense, possession and use is moved out of criminal courts and into a special court where each offender's unique situation is judged by legal experts, psychologists, and social workers. Treatment and further action is decided in these courts, where addicts and drug use is treated as a public health service rather than referring it to the justice system (like the U.S.), reports Fox News.
The resulting effect: a drastic reduction in addicts, with Portuguese officials and reports highlighting that this number, at 100,000 before the new policy was enacted, has been halved in the following ten years. Portugal's drug usage rates are now among the lowest of EU member states, according to the same report.
One more outcome: a lot less sick people. Drug related diseases including STDs and overdoses have been reduced even more than usage rates, which experts believe is the result of the government offering treatment with no threat of legal ramifications to addicts.
While this policy is by no means news, the statistics and figures, which take years to develop and subsequently depict the effects of the change, seem to be worth noting. In a country like America, which may take the philosophy of criminalization a bit far (more than half of America's federal inmates are in prison on drug convictions), other alternatives must, and to a small degree, are being discussed.
For policymakers or people simply interested in this topic, cases like Portugal are a great place to start.
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/portugal-drug-...
why would you post the whole article AND the link?? I didn't read any of it...too long
Portugal has got it right

Huntington, WV

#15 Mar 12, 2013
shoehorn wrote:
<quoted text>
why would you post the whole article AND the link?? I didn't read any of it...too long
So your too lazy to read and actually research something and educate yourself. Nice.
rand university

Charleston, WV

#16 Mar 12, 2013
Lmao wrote:
I wish the state would buy enough crack to fill up a tractor-trailer, place cameras in view of the truck, park it on Central Ave./the Westside of Charleston, open up the doors and walk away!
How long would it take before any action took place? How many murders would happen that day? How long would it take to empty the truck? Lol!!!
remember the movie gone in sixty seconds! lol
The wise one

Chesapeake, VA

#17 Mar 12, 2013
Any idea to end the crack issue in Charleston?.. One way is to pass an ordinance for all fat males to wear their pants up when they are bending over, that way less crack will be shown. And for all fat girls not to wear thongs, too much crack there. Crack problem will be solved.
Nobody

Mooresville, NC

#18 Mar 13, 2013
really wrote:
<quoted text>
what?!?
If there wasn't drug wars there wouldn't be people doing time on such thing. Yes I want this drug war to end!! I have kids. Did you seriously make a statement referring to dark ones?? I hope that wasnot pertaining to someone's race. If so its 2013 GET WITH THE PROGRAM!! ALL the toothless old white Meth heads all over this state are even in the drug war if not more?? & before you come back with a racist comment I am white and so are my children. Stop judging on race we are all Gods children! We don't choose our DNA. SO if your white you didn't make that choice anymore then the black lady sitting next to you@ the dr or the Mexican waiter at a restaurant chose their race. Grow up and stop that ignorant talk
If we are all the same, which is obviously bullshit, then why do blacks who are only about 12.6% of the US population commit half of the violent crime in this country? Why are 70% of black and mixed babies born to a single mother? Why are black men 7 times more likely to be diagnosed with HIV during their lifetime than white men? And before you say this is ignorant or racist, look these statistics up. There is nothing untruthful about them whatsoever. How do you explain these differences if we are all the same?

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Charleston Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Feet Pictures For Cash (Nov '11) 5 hr Becca-boo 24
Snitch 6 hr Marta 8
Circus 6 hr hang glider 2
Zachary Crawford likes 6 year old girls 7 hr InYourFace 1
South Central Prisoners Refused Clean Water Aft... (May '14) 8 hr CHAD 28
Jarrett Terrace Apartments (Dec '13) 8 hr CFR Knowledge 33
Charleston-Kanawha Housing Authority -- Charles... (Jul '13) 8 hr true 487
More from around the web

Charleston People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]