Parole setting free long-term inmates

Parole setting free long-term inmates

There are 88 comments on the Asheville Citizen-Times story from Oct 20, 2007, titled Parole setting free long-term inmates. In it, Asheville Citizen-Times reports that:

The sweetness of Betty Norton Young's mountain accent does little to reveal the tragedy she has endured for 30 years.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Asheville Citizen-Times.

Texas Proud

Conroe, TX

#21 Oct 21, 2007
Correction for last sentence statement...
They "DO NOT" deserve any consideration in being treated "Humanely"
MALLORYD

Leicester, NC

#22 Oct 21, 2007
NONE OF THOSE SCUMBAGS DESERVE TO BE RELEASED FROM PRISON AT ALL. THEY SHOULD HAVE TO SERVE EVERY DAY AND LIFE SHOULD MEAN LIFE. WHY DON'T WE STOP ELECTING PEOPLE TO THE LEGISLATURE WHO DON'T BELIEVE THAT LIFE IN PRISON SHOULD MEAN THAT THE SCUMBAG DIES THERE?
Juanita

Asheville, NC

#23 Oct 21, 2007
Ray Hyatt and LLoyd Green are two that is up for parole. they murdered three people. One was my brother. It was terrible for me and my family.We can't see our brother but they can kill three people and now be up for parole something is terrible wrong with this pictured.It was such a cruel murder that my dad and brother had to go twice to make sure it was my brother.can you imagine how hard this had to be we still miss my brother.I feel they will do the same thing again if let out.Please write the parole board and help put a stop to this.
sally

Manteo, NC

#24 Oct 21, 2007
People can change from 18 to 48 but if you look Phillip Turpin had 47 infractions while in prison.
Doesn't sound to me that any change was made. Why
do we need to be so humane to people who didn't think about being humane to there victims.
Chimps

Boiling Springs, SC

#25 Oct 21, 2007
There is no justice in this country. Unless of course you are rich enough to buy it.
Confused

Lincolnton, NC

#26 Oct 21, 2007
Bob Magnus wrote:
Sensational journalism and uninformed readers do not consider that persons who commit violent crimes, especially when under influence of alcohol and drugs, can and often do change radically over 20 to 30 years. Revenge and fear should not rule in these cases. Neither the Citizen-Times nor the self-righteous readers have done themselves proud on this issue.
This does not look sensational to me. I just browsed through their collection of life sentences, and I am seeing that statewide there are 70 people paroled for murder first degree after receiving life sentences. Some of the 70 even have prior incarcerations. I clicked on a few of the full profiles and found multiple murders. Plastering 70 mugshots across the front page would have been sensational.
markus

Hickory, NC

#27 Oct 21, 2007
this is just a example of the concerns for human life,the parole board don't care about victims and theirs families.they need free beds,so the federal gov can pay the state for new prisoners,its a bussiness.

“CLAN ROSE”

Since: Apr 07

Location hidden

#28 Oct 21, 2007
Send 'em to Texas! No parole for lifers there!
ronal Baxter

Sanford, NC

#29 Oct 21, 2007
our nation is fast loosing it] so much corruption and our leaders have completely forgotten the common person we are as a nation is fast following the down fall of the roman empire''when a criime is commited the law will tell you what rights the criminal has and you had better not do any harm to him; i wish there were a way the average person could sue and collect the parole board for such an act such as this deal' we need a day set aside to clean out the death row inmates mandaded ' 'how much could each state save if they would get ride of this trash i will donate and pay for the first box of bullets. 22 shorts and perhaps the weapon to fire them'
Scott Walters

Asheville, NC

#30 Oct 21, 2007
Texas Proud wrote:
PS. This 3rd strike rule needs to go also! If anyone is convicted of a violent crime where a human life is taken involving or during the commission of the crime, whether it's your 1st strike or not! You don't get a 2nd chance! Period! If our laws would get tougher against these types of offenders, if they knew their chances of really getting their true and deserved punishment would actually be imposed, they "might" think twice. That their punishment would actually be commensurate to their crime, they "might" be deterred, knowing what's going to happen to them after they are caught! They have no humanity in them. They do deserve any consideration in being treated "Humanely".
Do you have any understanding of the "three strikes and you're out" laws? It isn't about murders, for crying out loud -- it is about minor crimes. There are people in prison for life right now for stealing $150 of children's videos. Meanwhile, the Enron execs run free. All this "get tough on crime" nonsense is actually a war against the poor. It costs over $30,000 a year to keep someone in prison -- and what does society get from that? Nothing. But the prison-industrial complex gets millions. You are right, three strikes and you're out needs to be revoked -- but not to be replaced with a one strike an you're out policy. American has 5% of the world's population, but has 25% of the world's incarcerated population. That should tell you something -- that there is a lot of money in caging up human beings.

“The Harv”

Since: Mar 07

Western North Carolina

#31 Oct 21, 2007
I think it is great if a person changes and has remorse for what they have done (as they should). However thay should stay in prison so that they have longer to feel bad and think about what they have done!!
Chet Hodgin

High Point, NC

#32 Oct 21, 2007
The only responsibility of the state for these animals who commit such heinous crimes is:
1. Punishment
2 Protect the rest of us from these monsters.
By turning them loose, the wishes of the people have been violated. Thank goodness we no longer have parole in N.C. But that is not due to the wisdom of the Legislature. It's because a lot of Victims and other citizens marched on Raleigh and demanded justice. But there are still thousands of prisoners that were convicted prior to 1994 and are still subject to parole. It is irrelevant that the crimes were committed many years ago. The victims are still dead and the survivors are suffering every day. It's like the current controversy over the death penalty. These monsters committed unspeakable acts on their victims. And we are supposed to be concerned that they "might" experience a few seconds of pain at the moment of their execution. Baloney!
Who cares? I know I don't.
smokies

Princeton Junction, NJ

#33 Oct 21, 2007
Since all of the citizens in prison were sent there by corrupt racist they should be freed at once!(And given a free ice cream cone.)

The victims of crime need to stop whinning.

Criminals are merely expressing their frustration with a failed society when they rape and murder.
SIG

Asheville, NC

#34 Oct 21, 2007
Scott Walters wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you have any understanding of the "three strikes and you're out" laws? It isn't about murders, for crying out loud -- it is about minor crimes. There are people in prison for life right now for stealing $150 of children's videos. Meanwhile, the Enron execs run free. All this "get tough on crime" nonsense is actually a war against the poor. It costs over $30,000 a year to keep someone in prison -- and what does society get from that? Nothing. But the prison-industrial complex gets millions. You are right, three strikes and you're out needs to be revoked -- but not to be replaced with a one strike an you're out policy. American has 5% of the world's population, but has 25% of the world's incarcerated population. That should tell you something -- that there is a lot of money in caging up human beings.
Yea, right. It's because other countries will leave you with one less body part. Other countries typically speaking are harsh on crime. People are made an example. We cater to criminals here. They have a nice place to sleep, watch tv all day, exercise, hang out with their friends. Prison aint chit to some of these fools. And it's all for fear that we may violate someones rights. Well when these a-holes commit crimes, they have taken others rights away. I have a right to live, I have a right to have a home and property.. not to be a victim of murder, or property crimes, etc. As far as I'm concerned, these jokers shouldn't have any rights. And in some cases, they are treated better than folks out in the community. War against the poor? For heavens sakes!! 99% of poor people know just how they got there, and it sure isn't an excuse to commit crime!
another joke

United States

#35 Oct 21, 2007
THIS IS A FREAKING JOKE!!!!!!!!THE S.O.B WILL BE BACK AT IT AGAIN.WHAT ARE THEY GONNA DO WHEN HE KILLS AGAIN..GIVE HIM ANOTHER LIFE SENTENCE.THIS CHICKENSHOT SOCIETY WE LIVE IN HAS NO BALLS TO DELVE OUT JUSTICE. THE ONES WHO SET HIM FREE SHOULD HAVE TO LET HIM LIVE WITH THEM AND THEIR FAMILY. THEN THEY COULD SEE HOW IT IS TO LIVE IN WONDER IF THEY WILL WAKE UP OR NOT..
Bob Magnus

United States

#36 Oct 21, 2007
Mtnbred wrote:
<quoted text>
Change? Bob, these men took lives to get a little money. They should have been put to death and we wouldn't be having this discussion.
I am not referring specifically to the parolees mentioned in the article, whom I do not know. But I do know a number of others who were convicted of murder many years ago, given life sentences, became truly rehabilitated, and were later paroled. These men are now assets to our society. The sensationalism of today's article encourages our courts to lock the doors and throw away the keys. We can't afford that mentality and it's not fair.
Chris Callahan

Dillon, SC

#37 Oct 21, 2007
30 years is a long time. A 21 year old then is now 51. In similar situations, some of these inmates are active in the Church inside the prison, and will tell you that they are a completely different person at age 51 than when they were 21 and strung out on drugs.(Not that this particular case is the same--it's just that people can change in 30 years a LOT and the parole commission apparently felt Turpin was safe to release now. Perhaps he has a record of exemplary behavior in prison.

Put another way, it certainly doesn't offend me personally when a 21 year old serviceman AWOL serves 30 years in prison and at age 51 the parole commission sees fit to release him and he moves as far away from here as he can (California).

“RadicalDudette”

Since: Feb 07

Location hidden

#38 Oct 21, 2007
Two first degree murderers, two 2nd degree murderers and two 1st degree rapists on the list.

Why should they even be on a list for a Parole Hearing?

Perhaps the Parole Board should live with them for an extended stay and let them determine how safe they feel.
Visionary

Asheville, NC

#39 Oct 21, 2007
Brace yourselves folks, the day is coming when the criminal justice system will be totally broken because our society is producing more and more human beings without conscienceses, and society will revolt against the volume of taxes necessary to hire more peacekeepers, build more prisons and hire more public defenders. Add to this the HUGE number of CRIMINAL illegal immigrants who are here to stay (because we don't have the kahunas to deport them)and we are facing a situation in the not to distant future where there are more bad guys than good guys. Just as Roman civilization fell, so shall ours.

And we are all to blame for the wanton lawlessness. Every time you bend or break a law to suit yourself--from simple traffic violations like running red lights, to doing your kids homework for them, to stealing from your employer to cheating on your taxes--you are contributing to the demise. When you think about it, it all begins with selfishness which leads to lack of respect for others.

As our society further breaks down, it will become harder and harder to find people who want to put their lives on the line to be policemen and sheriffs. It's coming...and then it will be every person for him or herself. I never believed in guns before, but I'm now planning to arm myself.
NBNurse

Redmond, WA

#40 Oct 21, 2007
Don't Kick the cat or smoke the smoke or you will be in prison for 50 years. You can get less time and probation for murder. one ofthe murdered was a close relative and it was such a shock for his parents and siblings that they haven't hada normal life since. The probation hearings makes the crime seem like yest. The death sentence is the perfect answer.

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