people in military bases in France in...
joe m

Laughlin, NV

#3004 Dec 25, 2013
merry Christmas to everyone who served in france from Laughlin nv.
Norman Gardner

Bronx, NY

#3005 Dec 26, 2013
Happy holidays to alll the Bussac buddies out there.
Cheryl Miller

Purcellville, VA

#3006 Dec 26, 2013
I just found this website and thought you would enjoy a story that happened on my first day at Paris American Elementary in 1958.

My father was stationed at Camp des Loges in 1958-1959. We lived in Petit Beauregard. On the first day of school,(I was in the 6th grade and spoke no French at the time) an army bus took us to school. At school, someone got on the bus and told us to write down the number on the bus, as this was the bus that would take us home. When school let out, there were 50+ school buses waiting to take us home. I found the army bus and got on. I did not see anyone I knew. Instead of going to Petit Beauregard, it went to St. Germaine. The bus driver was French. I knew eventually the bus would go back to the Motor Pool, nearby, but I could not communicate with the bus driver. Fortunately, there was someone who could tell the bus driver what happened. He dropped me off at the entrance to Petit Beauregard about 2 hours after my journey began.

To this day, I still don't know how everyone else found the correct bus (a city bus) to take them home.

Even though we were not in France very long, I do have some fond memories of the time we spent there.
Steve

Woodbine, MD

#3007 Dec 29, 2013
Jane wrote:
My family lived in L'Hautil par Triel aqnd my father worked at CDL. There from 1962-1965. Would lov to see photos!
We lived on Rue de L'Hautil in Triel 1962-63. Went to Paris American School in Garches. Rode a small Renault army bus from Triel to Garches. I believe one of the other riders was named Jane. Could that be you??
Earl LaDere

Alma, MI

#3009 Jan 4, 2014
edward hopkins wrote:
was stationed at braconne, 1962-1964.at headquarters co. on winning volley ball team in 1962. southern france.
Hi Ed

I don't remember you but I also played on the volly ball team in 61 and early 62. I guess the only name I remember was Roy Kechuna (not sure of the spelling) But we had a good team.

Earl LaDere
Martine Dernoncourt

Poitiers, France

#3010 Jan 4, 2014
Happy New Year to all who were in France, mostly in La Rochelle, and happy birthday to all who were born in the US Military hospital in Aufredi caserne on the year 1954 !(1952 - 1958).
Martine Dernoncourt, La Rochelle, France.
MaryCarol Hopkins

Cincinnati, OH

#3011 Jan 6, 2014
My family lived in Petit Beauregard in the mid-fifties, and my sister and I went to the Paris-American school. I understand a new school has been built on the old school-ground, but does anyone know if Petit Beauregard is still there, or what became of it? My friends and I played in the woods around the old chateau all the time, but we were yelled at by some people--in French, of course, so we had no idea why they were angry. No one ever told us about live ammunition, or any danger, and we never went very close to the chateau, but we certainly had the impression that people were living there.

Does anyone know the address, or how to find the place--even if it's not really there anymore?

Since: Jul 12

Stroud, UK

#3012 Jan 7, 2014
MaryCarol Hopkins wrote:
My family lived in Petit Beauregard in the mid-fifties, and my sister and I went to the Paris-American school. I understand a new school has been built on the old school-ground, but does anyone know if Petit Beauregard is still there, or what became of it? My friends and I played in the woods around the old chateau all the time, but we were yelled at by some people--in French, of course, so we had no idea why they were angry. No one ever told us about live ammunition, or any danger, and we never went very close to the chateau, but we certainly had the impression that people were living there.
Does anyone know the address, or how to find the place--even if it's not really there anymore?
Hi MaryCarol, yes Petit Beauregard is still there, go on Google Earth and search Domaine du Petit Beauregard, Celle-Saint-Cloud, France. Not far to the NW is the old SHAPE due west to Camp Voluceau (SSW from Shape) and Camp des Loges is in the St Germain Forest to the NW of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. Camp des Loges is the training ground of PSG (Paris-St-Germain) Football club (Soccer to you)...France's premier team.
Have fun, Paul
Meriochaud James

Lyon, France

#3013 Jan 7, 2014
Norman Gardner wrote:
Happy holidays to alll the Bussac buddies out there.
Hi,
Happy New Year to you as well ! James
joe federico

East Hartford, CT

#3014 Jan 7, 2014
In the 1960's I was stationed with the 29th base post office in Metz france. I would be interested in connecting with anyone that was stationed at colone concern. these were the best years of my young life
I met my future wife there(Yvonne Biagini) we were married on July 15 th 1961.We just celebrated our 50th wedding anversity and spent 3 weeks with her family in france
Stephanie

Boston, MA

#3015 Jan 7, 2014
Im trying to find some articles/pictures of my father while he eas stationed in poitiers france from 1960-1964. In 1962 he won a weight lifting/bodybuilding title for best physique. Name: William Nutter
Kari

Marion, IN

#3017 Jan 9, 2014
Philippe wrote:
I'm looking for American citizens who have lived in military bases in France up to the sixties. I'd like to listen to their memories, possibly see some old pics. If I can get in touch with a sufficent amount of persons, I'd like to write a book about these specific circunstances.
Looking forward to hear from you
Sincerely,
Philippe
I am actually looking for a Philippe and Sylvia that were born to an american citizen stationed in France Philippe was born in OK in 1963 and Sylvia born in France in 1965. If anyone on here has any information that could help me find them, I would greatly appreciate it!
Jim Turlington

Sanford, FL

#3023 Feb 1, 2014
My father, was stationed in Maison Fort from 1961-64. I attended 1-3 grade at the American School. Our family lived on the French economy. We lived in France twice ,I was born in La Rochelle ,France ,we later in 1969-70 were stationed in Zweibrucken ,Germany.
Theresa

Murray, KY

#3026 Feb 9, 2014
Hello to all,
I have the long list of the present American servicemen to FONTENET ( St Jean d' Angely) period 1959-1960!
Friendly

Do you have a man listed of the name Evaristo Garcia, do not know what his rank was, he is my father. My mother is French from La Rochelle.
Norman Gardner

Bronx, NY

#3029 Feb 11, 2014
Is there a website for APO 215 that anyone may know of?
CHRISTINE

Échirolles, France

#3031 Feb 13, 2014
search vétérans who made the war in VIETNAM / DA NANG 366th TFW ( 1965-1969 )
thanks
Peter Maydanis

Phoenix, AZ

#3032 Feb 16, 2014
I was stationed in Paris and worked in the Blockhous Signal Office @ 79 Rue La Perouse during the period 1955 - 1956. My unit was the 7774 Signal Battalion AU, Paris, Detachment. We worked 24 hours a day, six days on and two days off. We rotated shifts: day shift 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., swing 4 p.m. to Midnight, and midnight to 8 a.m. Every third tour we began at 8 a.m. and ended at 4 p.m. and we were off duty from then until two days later--practically 3 days off--until the beginning of the swing shift at 4 p.m. However, one tour provided only a short day and one half off. Our big perk was that on midnights we all reported for duty as schduled, signed in, and then took off until about 4 a.m. since Washington, six hours behind us, was still asleep and there was very little traffic. On the swing shift, we could bug out about usually the last two hours to take in a movie or visit a bar as long as we were back when the midnight shift reported to take our place. Being right off Avenue D'Iena and a stone's throw from the Arc De Triomphe or the Champs-Ellysees gave us a pretty fertile field of places to go and things to do while we were in "recess" from out shifts. On the long, almost 3 day off period, we could catch a train to Bruxelles or down to Fontainebleau, Orleans, Chartres, etc. for the day. Really very good duty and there were only about a couple dozen of us enlisted personnel and four officers. The officers were good Joes. If you did your work and stayed sober, you were pretty much left alone. Don't forget, the Louvre was free on Thursdays, and I think I covered about every salle and enceinte (hallway) in the 18 months that it took for me to do it. I can taste those sandwich sausisson chaud now that we used to go out and grab toward the end of the swing or the middle of the midnight shifts when we in fact had to work them. If we had the taxi fare we could mange a quick trip to Les Halles and to grab some onion soup at the Le Chien qui Fume. Alas: the best years of my unmarried life were spent there! Peter Maydanis, Phoenix, Arizona
George Butch Wester

Florahome, FL

#3033 Feb 16, 2014
Man, what a memory! Being stationed downtown with plenty of time off would have been the best. I was stationed at Camp Des Loges, and so it was a sporty drive or bus ride to get downtown. I can taste those sausage sandwiches as well, in fresh, hard crusted french bread. Also, the onion soup was something I've been trying to duplicate ever since. I was there '63 to '66. Best to you, Pete.
Peter Maydanis wrote:
I was stationed in Paris and worked in the Blockhous Signal Office @ 79 Rue La Perouse during the period 1955 - 1956. My unit was the 7774 Signal Battalion AU, Paris, Detachment. We worked 24 hours a day, six days on and two days off. We rotated shifts: day shift 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., swing 4 p.m. to Midnight, and midnight to 8 a.m. Every third tour we began at 8 a.m. and ended at 4 p.m. and we were off duty from then until two days later--practically 3 days off--until the beginning of the swing shift at 4 p.m. However, one tour provided only a short day and one half off. Our big perk was that on midnights we all reported for duty as schduled, signed in, and then took off until about 4 a.m. since Washington, six hours behind us, was still asleep and there was very little traffic. On the swing shift, we could bug out about usually the last two hours to take in a movie or visit a bar as long as we were back when the midnight shift reported to take our place. Being right off Avenue D'Iena and a stone's throw from the Arc De Triomphe or the Champs-Ellysees gave us a pretty fertile field of places to go and things to do while we were in "recess" from out shifts. On the long, almost 3 day off period, we could catch a train to Bruxelles or down to Fontainebleau, Orleans, Chartres, etc. for the day. Really very good duty and there were only about a couple dozen of us enlisted personnel and four officers. The officers were good Joes. If you did your work and stayed sober, you were pretty much left alone. Don't forget, the Louvre was free on Thursdays, and I think I covered about every salle and enceinte (hallway) in the 18 months that it took for me to do it. I can taste those sandwich sausisson chaud now that we used to go out and grab toward the end of the swing or the middle of the midnight shifts when we in fact had to work them. If we had the taxi fare we could mange a quick trip to Les Halles and to grab some onion soup at the Le Chien qui Fume. Alas: the best years of my unmarried life were spent there! Peter Maydanis, Phoenix, Arizona
Gene Walsh

Eatontown, NJ

#3034 Feb 16, 2014
Peter Maydanis wrote:
I was stationed in Paris and worked in the Blockhous Signal Office @ 79 Rue La Perouse during the period 1955 - 1956. My unit was the 7774 Signal Battalion AU, Paris, Detachment. We worked 24 hours a day, six days on and two days off. We rotated shifts: day shift 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., swing 4 p.m. to Midnight, and midnight to 8 a.m. Every third tour we began at 8 a.m. and ended at 4 p.m. and we were off duty from then until two days later--practically 3 days off--until the beginning of the swing shift at 4 p.m. However, one tour provided only a short day and one half off. Our big perk was that on midnights we all reported for duty as schduled, signed in, and then took off until about 4 a.m. since Washington, six hours behind us, was still asleep and there was very little traffic. On the swing shift, we could bug out about usually the last two hours to take in a movie or visit a bar as long as we were back when the midnight shift reported to take our place. Being right off Avenue D'Iena and a stone's throw from the Arc De Triomphe or the Champs-Ellysees gave us a pretty fertile field of places to go and things to do while we were in "recess" from out shifts. On the long, almost 3 day off period, we could catch a train to Bruxelles or down to Fontainebleau, Orleans, Chartres, etc. for the day. Really very good duty and there were only about a couple dozen of us enlisted personnel and four officers. The officers were good Joes. If you did your work and stayed sober, you were pretty much left alone. Don't forget, the Louvre was free on Thursdays, and I think I covered about every salle and enceinte (hallway) in the 18 months that it took for me to do it. I can taste those sandwich sausisson chaud now that we used to go out and grab toward the end of the swing or the middle of the midnight shifts when we in fact had to work them. If we had the taxi fare we could mange a quick trip to Les Halles and to grab some onion soup at the Le Chien qui Fume. Alas: the best years of my unmarried life were spent there! Peter Maydanis, Phoenix, Arizona
Peter---29 Rue LaPerouse. It was torn down back in the 70's. Its now the SCOR Insurance company building. And before that it was the back office for BNP.
Eddie

Eustis, FL

#3035 Feb 16, 2014
Daryl D wrote:
I was stationed at Ingrandes supply depot base from September 1963 to January 1964, where then I was transfered to Germany. I was in the enlisted man's club right after work on November 22, 1963, when the announcement came that JFK was shot. The post was closed down for a few days, and all passes and leaves were cancelled.
I recall going down town. the next morning in civilian clothes. 68th Trans was scheduled for an Inspection. We had a formation for those that wanted to go to church services and the rest were told to cool it. We had very few that ever went off the installiation. I never stayed on the place unless i had to work or sleep.Had a wonderful time..

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