people in military bases in France in...
A2c_ RobbieWard

La Crosse, WI

#2766 Jun 29, 2013
I was stationed at Camp des Loges from April 1956 till Feg 1958. I worked in the communications center in the HQ bldg. I was married in 8 Dec 1956 to Spec5 Kenneth Mohr, Army, in St Germain-en-laye by the Mayor. Didn't understand any of it. Signed the book so I guess it was legal. The next day we were married in the chapel on base. Our son was born 9-9-1957 at Paris American Hospital in Paris. I was the lifeguard for the base pool the summer of 1956. I was the only qualified life guard on the base. So I worked mids, slept, lifeguarded, slept some more and went to work. I was a small base and only was there for support services for the HQ which was Headquarters European Command. It was later moved to Stuttgart, Germany. There was a lot of "Yankee go Home" graffiti over there when I was there.
Earl Hershberger

Detroit, MI

#2767 Jun 29, 2013
I was stationed In Orleans from Oct 1963 to May of 1965. I was in the signal unit crepto part under Col John L. Lapoint who ran the office. I was then a Spc 4. Our barracks was just across the street from the communcation building it was between out Barracks and the office. I also served in the Honor Guard. with Joh Potter cook and Dan Burlginton
Melvin Williams

Chicago, IL

#2768 Jun 29, 2013
Billie Messner wrote:
I was with the U.S.Army in Saumur France from 1958 thru 1962 At the US.Army Depot Saumur
Woule like to contact any one interest in this subject.
We have an Assocation and get togeather once a year.
Bill
I was with the SPs until they brought in the MP co, i can not remember our unit number i can only remember one person from that time. His name was Major Giles i think i am going to go through my old papers to see if i can find any thing. I keep thinking about the 19th MP unit but i can't remember where it was. Old age is robbing me of my memory. I can remember when you went through the gate going to the left you had had to make hard right turn to get to the next depot. [email protected]
charlie blute

Beverly, MA

#2769 Jun 30, 2013
One of our soldiers from Fontenet, France is seeking his long lost love. Her name is Agnes De Majos, she is originally from St. Jean d'Angely, France, she might be living either in France or the United States. If anyone knows of Agnes, please contact me at this email address. [email protected] Thank you.
charlie blute

Beverly, MA

#2770 Jun 30, 2013
I recently learned that the town hall in LaRochelle burned down. Film is on www.youtube.com .
John Sarhage

Piscataway, NJ

#2771 Jun 30, 2013
A2c_ RobbieWard wrote:
I was stationed at Camp des Loges from April 1956 till Feg 1958. I worked in the communications center in the HQ bldg. I was married in 8 Dec 1956 to Spec5 Kenneth Mohr, Army, in St Germain-en-laye by the Mayor. Didn't understand any of it. Signed the book so I guess it was legal. The next day we were married in the chapel on base. Our son was born 9-9-1957 at Paris American Hospital in Paris. I was the lifeguard for the base pool the summer of 1956. I was the only qualified life guard on the base. So I worked mids, slept, lifeguarded, slept some more and went to work. I was a small base and only was there for support services for the HQ which was Headquarters European Command. It was later moved to Stuttgart, Germany. There was a lot of "Yankee go Home" graffiti over there when I was there.
I was station at Camp des Loges and worked in the same communication center (teletypewrite operator) from Sept 1958 unitl Mid 1960. Dated an Au Pere from Norway. Last months of service I was station at Fort Sam Houston, Texas 178th Signal Bn as the Company Clerk.
John Sarhage

Piscataway, NJ

#2772 Jun 30, 2013
I was stationed at Camp des Loges and worked the same Communications Center as Teletypewriter Operator. Favorite watering hole was Mama's in Ste Germain en Laye. Dated a mother's helper from Norway. Service my last month of service at Fort Sam Houston, Texas with 178th Signal Bn as the Company Clerk.
Ed Miller

Palm Bay, FL

#2773 Jun 30, 2013
I lived in France from 1952 through 1963. MY father was a flight engineer flying for the Supreme Allied Commander out of Orly field. I went to school on the base. First through third grade at the school across from the theater and beside the bowling alley and church. Fourth grade
at the auditorium on base, and fifth and sixth at Paris American. Teachers were Mr. Mahoney and Mr. McLaughlin respectively. Lived in American housing in Grigny on H Street.
PatEucom

Versailles, KY

#2774 Jun 30, 2013
A2c_ RobbieWard wrote:
I was stationed at Camp des Loges from April 1956 till Feg 1958. I worked in the communications center in the HQ bldg. I was married in 8 Dec 1956 to Spec5 Kenneth Mohr, Army, in St Germain-en-laye by the Mayor. Didn't understand any of it. Signed the book so I guess it was legal. The next day we were married in the chapel on base. Our son was born 9-9-1957 at Paris American Hospital in Paris. I was the lifeguard for the base pool the summer of 1956. I was the only qualified life guard on the base. So I worked mids, slept, lifeguarded, slept some more and went to work. I was a small base and only was there for support services for the HQ which was Headquarters European Command. It was later moved to Stuttgart, Germany. There was a lot of "Yankee go Home" graffiti over there when I was there.
I was there at the same time.1956-1958. My husband worked in TS Control.Our oldest son was born 9-24-1957.Your wife and I probably went to Rue Mar Buff for OB/GN appointments at the same time. Yes lots of " Yankee Go Home" signs back then. Most posts on here seem to say all was fine. It was at times but I recall many times when alerts scared me!Maybe we crossed paths at one time or another. Best wishes.
Eric-John GUINT

Taipei, Taiwan

#2775 Jul 2, 2013
For all those who served proudly in Fontainebleau and their families
I lived in Fontainebleau, my father John Roger Guint US ARMY was posted firstly in the castle then in the barracks LARIBOISIERE
Key points and facts of NATO forces in FONTAINEBLEAU
1ST PART
From 1949 to 1967 Fontainebleau was the site of four headquarters of NATO: Staff Allied Central Europe (Allied Force Centre; AFCENT), the Staff of Land Forces (LANDCENT), the 'Staff of the air Force (AIRCENT) and the Staff of the Navy (NAVCENT).
Europe since 1950 Fontainebleau had an Allied Headquarters who reported to the Organization for the Defense of Western Europe created by the Brussels Treaty of March 17, 1948 signed by Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, France and the United Kingdom. In 1951 the headquarters was replaced with that of NATO.
The North Atlantic Treaty was signed in Washington on 4 April 1949. The Treaty states in its preamble states' determination to "safeguard the freedom of their peoples, their common heritage and civilization, based on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and the rule of law.
" Article 5 states: "The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all
In 1961, 15 states are members of NATO: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Nations of these, 12 were founding members of the Alliance, Greece and Turkey joined in 1952, Germany in 1955.
The AFCENT directly to the Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, SHAPE) in Paris, AFCENT is the largest general quarters European NATO. Other commands are located in Norway Kolsaas for Northern Europe in Naples, Italy for South Europe and Malta to the Allied forces in the Mediterranean.
The AFCENT military gathers eight nations: Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. The missions of CINCENT (Commander-in-Chief Allied Central Europe Commander Allied Centre Europe) to prepare the defense of the Benelux, West Germany and France Metropolitan. For that he must not only coordinate but also integrate the forces assigned.
A Fontainebleau headquarters and services necessary for the functioning of NATO are scattered throughout the city.
Court Henri IV, also known as Court Offices is occupied by AFCENT.
In front of the Court of Farewells, at the Hotel de France and England, a superb mansion that once belonged to the Duchess of Etampes, mistress of François 1er, house sections geographical, financial and tax AFCENT and Circle the-mess NCOs (Interallied Senior NCO's Club).
Camp Guynemer, presented as a "camp modern, bright and located one mile south of Fontainebleau" hosts a large number of general quarters and services: AIRCENT HQ, HQ NAVCENT the unit support the AIRCENT a fleet of vehicles, transmission units, a shop, a cinema, a chapel, a swimming pool, sports fields ... Everything is done for the military allies, particularly the U.S., to feel at home , being able to play baseball for example. Of course, the British organized cricket tournaments.
Damesme barracks near the city center of Fontainebleau was occupied by the French forces supporting the AFCENT and elements of the British Royal Air Force.
Eric-John GUINT

Taipei, Taiwan

#2776 Jul 2, 2013
2ND PART

Lariboisière barracks located immediately south of the park of the castle houses a base of the U.S. army which also provides everything needed by the military but also the families of American and Canadian soldiers.
A cinema them exclusively. An agency of the American Express Company and an office of the Western Union offer all banking and postal services. The barracks also hosts a British squadron transmissions.
The district Chataux, between the barracks and the hospital Damesme, housing British troops, it will also find a movie theater dedicated to the English.
In addition to the quartermaster general, Fontainebleau hosts facilities for housing and well-being of the Alliance's military and their families.
If infrastructure is national, there are also places where the military of various nations can coexist, and at 43 rue Royale is the Circle Allied officers mess (Interallied Officers' Club) while the NCOs have a part of the Hotel de France and England. The company has two clubs in Fontainebleau, one in the barracks Lariboisière, the other in the camp Guynemer.
At the request of the SHAPE homes were built in 1951 by architect Marcel Lods on land reclaimed from the forest to the north-west of the city. In a few months 4 bars 130 meters long, were mounted to housing, in 280 apartments, the married officers and their subordinates AFCENT.
There are also accommodations for officers (Bachelor Officer Quarters; BOQs), behind the Circle officers for LANDCENT rue Royale and the camp for AIRCENT Guynemer. However, the housing officials are not in sufficient numbers and military allies rent apartments and houses not only in Fontainebleau but also in the surrounding villages up to 15 km.
Many sports and cultural clubs allow allied military and their families to maintain an intense social life at Fontainebleau. Clubs, sailing, shooting, golf, squash, tennis and a flying club - powered flight and gliding Episy near Moret-sur-Loing - are managed by AFCENT and AIRCENT they are open to all military weapons. In City comedy club is created by the English and a car club. Clubs allied officers and NCOs in their declension feminine and Club gathers Female spouses of officers while Femotan Club is reserved for the wives of non-commissioned officers. These clubs organize recreational activities such as dancing, Highland dancing, bridge, bingo games (every Friday evening in winter), and a few shows. Allied Officers Club has a small library open to members of the general quarters and their families.
A line of buses, "cars aircent" Guynemer connects the camp instead of General de Gaulle serving as the head-quarters of the AFCENT and LANDCENT and the NCO Club, and joined the Royal Street Club officers and units "BOQs." Other cars can reach the station of Fontainebleau-Avon.
To educate the children of military personnel assigned to Fontainebleau International School was founded in 1954 by an agreement between the Ministry of National Education and French SHAPE. She works as an annex to the high school François 1er who manages administrative. Each nation will affect its teachers and children 5 to 18 years can take to complete Fontainebleau school curriculum. A new building was built at the bottom of Park Lycée François 1er but the first military arrive while the school has not yet completed. The start of 1954 is made in a wing of the castle overlooking the English Garden. New buildings of the International School were delivered during 1955. Staff to be fleshed As the arrival of the military and their families to have 100 pupils. The school became Lycée International in 1960.
General de Gaulle announced March 7, 1966 President Johnson to withdraw France from the integrated military structure. On 1 July, the French representatives left the military organizations. The staffs of NATO in France, including those of Fontainebleau were evacuated on April 1, 1967.
Best regards
Eric-John GUINT

Taipei, Taiwan

#2777 Jul 2, 2013
For all those who served proudly in Fontainebleau and their families
I lived in Fontainebleau, my father John Roger Guint was posted firstly in the castle and the barracks LARIBOISIERE
Key points and facts of NATO forces in FONTAINEBLEAU
From 1949 to 1967 Fontainebleau was the site of four headquarters of NATO: Staff Allied Central Europe (Allied Force Centre; AFCENT), the Staff of Land Forces (LANDCENT), the 'Staff of the air Force (AIRCENT) and the Staff of the Navy (NAVCENT).
Europe since 1950 Fontainebleau had an Allied Headquarters who reported to the Organization for the Defense of Western Europe created by the Brussels Treaty of March 17, 1948 signed by Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, France and the United Kingdom. In 1951 the headquarters was replaced with that of NATO.
The North Atlantic Treaty was signed in Washington on 4 April 1949. The Treaty states in its preamble states' determination to "safeguard the freedom of their peoples, their common heritage and civilization, based on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and the rule of law." Article 5 states: "The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all
In 1961, 15 states are members of NATO: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Nations of these, 12 were founding members of the Alliance, Greece and Turkey joined in 1952, Germany in 1955.
The AFCENT directly to the Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, SHAPE) in Paris, AFCENT is the largest general quarters European NATO. Other commands are located in Norway Kolsaas for Northern Europe in Naples, Italy for South Europe and Malta to the Allied forces in the Mediterranean.
The AFCENT military gathers eight nations: Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. The missions of CINCENT (Commander-in-Chief Allied Central Europe Commander Allied Centre Europe) to prepare the defense of the Benelux, West Germany and France Metropolitan. For that he must not only coordinate but also integrate the forces assigned.
A Fontainebleau headquarters and services necessary for the functioning of NATO are scattered throughout the city.
Court Henri IV, also known as Court Offices is occupied by AFCENT.
In front of the Court of Farewells, at the Hotel de France and England, a superb mansion that once belonged to the Duchess of Etampes, mistress of François 1er, house sections geographical, financial and tax AFCENT and Circle the-mess NCOs (Interallied Senior NCO's Club).
Camp Guynemer, presented as a "camp modern, bright and located one mile south of Fontainebleau" hosts a large number of general quarters and services: AIRCENT HQ, HQ NAVCENT the unit support the AIRCENT a fleet of vehicles, transmission units, a shop, a cinema, a chapel, a swimming pool, sports fields ... Everything is done for the military allies, particularly the U.S., to feel at home , being able to play baseball for example. Of course, the British organized cricket tournaments.
Damesme barracks near the city center of Fontainebleau was occupied by the French forces supporting the AFCENT and elements of the British Royal Air Force.
Walt Bollech

Dover, DE

#2778 Jul 2, 2013
A2c_ RobbieWard wrote:
I was stationed at Camp des Loges from April 1956 till Feg 1958. I worked in the communications center in the HQ bldg. I was married in 8 Dec 1956 to Spec5 Kenneth Mohr, Army, in St Germain-en-laye by the Mayor. Didn't understand any of it. Signed the book so I guess it was legal. The next day we were married in the chapel on base. Our son was born 9-9-1957 at Paris American Hospital in Paris. I was the lifeguard for the base pool the summer of 1956. I was the only qualified life guard on the base. So I worked mids, slept, lifeguarded, slept some more and went to work. I was a small base and only was there for support services for the HQ which was Headquarters European Command. It was later moved to Stuttgart, Germany. There was a lot of "Yankee go Home" graffiti over there when I was there.
Hi Robbie,

I was with the signal corp at Camp des Loges in the early 60's. I recall only one swimming pool at that time. That one was located in front of the telephone communications building and across the street from the mess hall. Unused at the time and in disrepair it had a chained link fence around it and eventuality that was replaced with a white picket fence. I have a few fotos of the pool.
Many fond memories of my time spent at Camp des Loges and in France.

Walt Bollech
Camp des Loges
Jan 62-May 64
Butch Wester

Jasper, FL

#2779 Jul 2, 2013
Walt Bollech wrote:
<quoted text>
Hi Robbie,
I was with the signal corp at Camp des Loges in the early 60's. I recall only one swimming pool at that time. That one was located in front of the telephone communications building and across the street from the mess hall. Unused at the time and in disrepair it had a chained link fence around it and eventuality that was replaced with a white picket fence. I have a few fotos of the pool.
Many fond memories of my time spent at Camp des Loges and in France.
Walt Bollech
Camp des Loges
Jan 62-May 64
I remember the swimming pool quite well. I was there from 1963 to 1966. There was only one summer, I believe 1964 or 1965 when it actually opened because it was too cool the other summers.
Frawley BECKER

Glendale, CA

#2780 Jul 2, 2013
Truth Hurts88987 Sunday Jun 23, who wrote:

The German army occupied France in only 4 days from 10/June/1940 till 14/June/1940 in ww2!!!!
The French don't have army, they have a phalanxes of peacekeeping with a group of African mercenaries
The French weapons are horrible, it's very very bad quality, and it's not qualified for a regional wars! it's a peace of sh!t!
It's too risky if the pilot flew with the French jet, because it can fall down in any moment with no reason even if it's a new!!! And it happened before!
France is one of the weakest country in Europe, even the Somali Army is stronger than France because the Somalis buy Russian weapons (Which's high quality)!!!
The French try to show off that they're strong by attacking a poor African countries that they don't have food to it!
But they wont dare to fight a strong countries like North Korea, Iran, Syria...etc.
So, i urge the French to forget about the military and armament, go and cancel your phalanxes just like what Switzerland did, and go on with your typical activities such as Fashions, Perfume, Plastic Surgeries, Prostitution, Cheese Production..etc.
The strongest armies in the world are: USA, Russia, and China that's all!
Everyone knows that France is weak!
I know that nobody going to agree with me, but think about it, and read my comment carefully!
The Truth Hurts...
__________

TO "TRUTH HURTS 88987":

YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY RIGHT! The French have no army to speak of (haven’t had one since Napoleon). And I guess from a strictly military point of view, that’s important.

ON THE OTHER HAND, they discovered radium, and invented pasteurization, anesthesia, motion pictures, Braille, champagne, modern logic, the quadrille and the minuet, and the middle class. Almost 30% of all English words have a French origin, including restaurant, liaison, ballet, affair, class, omelet, homage, peasant, justice, mayor, government, priest, giraffe, and of course détente where it even kept its accent. And where would Rodgers & Hammerstein’s South Pacific be without “There is Nothing Like a DAME”, another French word imported!

France gave us Monet, Manet, Renoir, Utrillo, Toulouse-Lautrec and almost all the Impressionist painters. Half a century earlier it was Ingres, Delacroix, Géricault, and before that, Fragonard. Then there was their Gothic architecture with the cathedrals of Reims, Chartres, Rouen, and Notre Dame de Paris. And let’s not forget writers Molière, Racine, Hugo, Dumas, de Maupassant, Stendhal, Beaudelaire, Rimbaud, Pagnol, Sagan. And sculptor Rodin.

They built the Louvre museum, Versailles, Fontainebleau, Blois, and the grand castles of the Loire Valley. They have one of the finest national libraries in the world, and with the Académie Française the best monitor of language. French was the official language of the English, Polish, Austrian, and Spanish courts.

Without an army they nevertheless organized the French Underground and the Free French during World War II. In World War I they died at Verdun, Château-Thierry, Bellow Woods and the Argonne along with the American soldiers. They produced “The Sun King”, Louis XIV, Marquette and Joliet, Richard-the-Lionhearted, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Charlemagne, Clémenceau, and Sarah Bernhardt. They wove the Bayeux Tapestries. They gave us Louisiana, 14 other other states, and the Mississippi River in the best purchase the United States ever made. They gave us Lafayette. One of the three chefs at the White House is always French. They created the most stirring of all national anthems, established “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity” as their coda, and they never had slaves.

In 1960 they set off an Atom Bomb that was more powerful than the American, English, and Russian ones all combined. BUT YOU ARE RIGHT, Mr. Truth Hurts 88987 – The French just don’t have an army, and that’s the real mark of a civilization, isn’t it?

Frawley BECKER
joe m

Faribault, MN

#2781 Jul 3, 2013
thank you frawley becker. I wanted to respond but you said it best.
Gene Walsh

Eatontown, NJ

#2782 Jul 3, 2013
Frawley--I enjoyed your most excellent reply to that diatribe.
Meriochaud James

Lyon, France

#2783 Jul 3, 2013
Frawley BECKER wrote:
Truth Hurts88987 Sunday Jun 23, who wrote:
The German army occupied France in only 4 days from 10/June/1940 till 14/June/1940 in ww2!!!!
The French don't have army, they have a phalanxes of peacekeeping with a group of African mercenaries
The French weapons are horrible, it's very very bad quality, and it's not qualified for a regional wars! it's a peace of sh!t!
It's too risky if the pilot flew with the French jet, because it can fall down in any moment with no reason even if it's a new!!! And it happened before!
The French try to show off that they're strong by attacking a poor African countries that they don't have food to it!
But they wont dare to fight a strong countries like North Korea, Iran, Syria...etc.
So, i urge the French to forget about the military and armament, go and cancel your phalanxes just like what Switzerland did, and go on with your typical activities such as Fashions, Perfume, Plastic Surgeries, Prostitution, Cheese Production..etc.
The strongest armies in the world are: USA, Russia, and China that's all!
Everyone knows that France is weak!
I know that nobody going to agree with me, but think about it, and read my comment carefully!
The Truth Hurts...
__________
TO "TRUTH HURTS 88987":
YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY RIGHT! The French have no army to speak of (haven’t had one since Napoleon). And I guess from a strictly military point of view, that’s important.
ON THE OTHER HAND, they discovered radium, and invented pasteurization, anesthesia, motion pictures, Braille, champagne, modern logic, the quadrille and the minuet, and the middle class. Almost 30% of all English words have a French origin, including restaurant, liaison, ballet, affair, class, omelet, homage, peasant, justice, mayor, government, priest, giraffe, and of course détente where it even kept its accent. And where would Rodgers & Hammerstein’s South Pacific be without “There is Nothing Like a DAME”, another French word imported!
France gave us Monet, Manet, Renoir, Utrillo, Toulouse-Lautrec and almost all the Impressionist painters. Half a century earlier it was Ingres, Delacroix, Géricault, and before that, Fragonard. Then there was their Gothic architecture with the cathedrals of Reims, Chartres, Rouen, and Notre Dame de Paris. And let’s not forget writers Molière, Racine, Hugo, Dumas, de Maupassant, Stendhal, Beaudelaire, Rimbaud, Pagnol, Sagan. And sculptor Rodin.
They built the Louvre museum, Versailles, Fontainebleau, Blois, and the grand castles of the Loire Valley. They have one of the finest national libraries in the world, and with the Académie Française the best monitor of language. French was the official language of the English, Polish, Austrian, and Spanish courts.
Without an army they nevertheless organized the French Underground and the Free French during World War II. In World War I they died at Verdun, Château-Thierry, Bellow Woods and the Argonne along with the American soldiers. They produced “The Sun King”, Louis XIV, Marquette and Joliet, Richard-the-Lionhearted, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Charlemagne, Clémenceau, and Sarah Bernhardt. They wove the Bayeux Tapestries. They gave us Louisiana, 14 other other states, and the Mississippi River in the best purchase the United States ever made. They gave us Lafayette. One of the three chefs at the White House is always French. They created the most stirring of all national anthems, established “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity” as their coda, and they never had slaves.
In 1960 they set off an Atom Bomb that was more powerful than the American, English, and Russian ones all combined. BUT YOU ARE RIGHT, Mr. Truth Hurts 88987 – The French just don’t have an army, and that’s the real mark of a civilization, isn’t it?
Frawley BECKER
Merci beaucoup Monsieur Frawler Becker ! Comme vous le savez, il y a des imbéciles dangereux un peu partout !Thanks again for your nice answer !
Meriochaud James

Lyon, France

#2784 Jul 3, 2013
Hi,

Merci beaucoup Messieurs ! Thanks again for you good, nice and smart answers !- We, French people appreciate it very much. We are proud of your great American People. Merci !
John Beard

Raleigh, NC

#2785 Jul 3, 2013
Frawley--I never knew the worth of you 'til now. Great response!

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