Woman drowns in Schroon Lake

Woman drowns in Schroon Lake

There are 16 comments on the www.pressrepublican.com story from Aug 13, 2008, titled Woman drowns in Schroon Lake. In it, www.pressrepublican.com reports that:

An elderly woman drowned after going wading in Schroon Lake Tuesday night. Family members reported Elizabeth A. Weiner, 81, of 18 Hurd St., Cazenovia, missing after she failed to return around 6:30 p.m.Tuesday.

She was found at 7:55 p.m. in the lake behind the Davis Motel, near where her family has a summer camp.

She was discovered 10 feet from shore, unresponsive and face down in two feet of water, according to the State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation. Police said the Schroon Lake Rescue Squad was called but no lifesaving measures were taken, because Mrs. Weiner was deceased.

Investigators said Mrs. Weiner left her camp to go wading by herself in Schroon Lake. She was a seasonal resident of Schroon Lake, police said, and known to be a non-swimmer.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.pressrepublican.com.

Ponderer

United States

#1 Aug 15, 2008
Sounds like a good death to me. She probably had a stroke or a heart attack, then drowned.

Reminds me of a couple of things:

Sloan Wilson's mother-in-law's death one winter. She put on her bathing suit and took a "swim" on the lake. She died of hypothermia.

Woody Allen's first "serious" movie, wherein the anti-heroine commits suicide ala Virgina Wolfe by walking out into the ocean.
truth

Hampton, NH

#2 Aug 18, 2008
you are a real jerk
Butler Ave

Brockport, NY

#3 Aug 19, 2008
This was a remarkable woman who had led an accomplished life, raised a wonderful family and had loved her summers in Schroon Lake.
I am fortunate enough to work with her daughter.
Sloan Wilson's mother's suicide isn't the same thing at all. Shame on you.
Butler Ave

Brockport, NY

#4 Aug 19, 2008
I must have really meant this since I sent it 3 times.....oops.
Ponderer

United States

#5 Aug 19, 2008
I'm very sorry if I offended anyone. I sincerely did not mean to diminish her life, though I take your point.

Sloan Wilson's mother-in-law did not commit suicide. She had Alzheimer's. I've always thought it was a very poetic way to go, and much better than lingering in a nursing home.
Ponderer

United States

#6 Aug 19, 2008
One more comment.

When I read about your friend's/relative's death, I thought what a wonderful way to die: She was doing something she loved. She was in her lake, surrounded by familiar mountains and memories. Far too many of us die from cancer, heart disease, kidney failure, etc., which are not what I would call good deaths.
bernie

Cobleskill, NY

#7 Aug 19, 2008
Ponderer wrote:
Sounds like a good death to me. She probably had a stroke or a heart attack, then drowned.
Reminds me of a couple of things:
Sloan Wilson's mother-in-law's death one winter. She put on her bathing suit and took a "swim" on the lake. She died of hypothermia.
Woody Allen's first "serious" movie, wherein the anti-heroine commits suicide ala Virgina Wolfe by walking out into the ocean.
Yep---sounds like I would call it but what actually dragged her down? I knew her and swam often with her stroke for stroke until she pulled a knife from her bikini and opened clams she had tucked away--where I couln't guess but their were only two openings I thought possible or were there three? I was a catholic and numbers were confusing after the second commandment but the author by first name was Ian and what in heck was the name of that movie?
bernie

Cobleskill, NY

#8 Aug 19, 2008
bernie wrote:
<quoted text>Yep---sounds like I would call it but what actually dragged her down? I knew her and swam often with her stroke for stroke until she pulled a knife from her bikini and opened clams she had tucked away--where I couln't guess but their were only two openings I thought possible or were there three? I was a catholic and numbers were confusing after the second commandment but the author by first name was Ian and what in heck was the name of that movie?
No malcontent intended. I meant nothing at all for her sorry demise. God bless her.
Offensive

Howes Cave, NY

#9 Aug 19, 2008
What a comment to make about a recently deceased person. No malcontent? Right. Your God bless her thrown in at the end doesn't excuse your comment.
Ponderer

United States

#10 Aug 20, 2008
Offensive wrote:
What a comment to make about a recently deceased person. No malcontent? Right. Your God bless her thrown in at the end doesn't excuse your comment.
bernie and I often banter back and forth on different threads. Knowing him, I'd say that he meant no maliciousness or insensitivity at all. He is not a malicious or insensitive person.

If this person is someone you knew and cared for, I am sorry for your loss.
Ponderer

United States

#11 Aug 20, 2008
bernie wrote:
<quoted text>Yep---sounds like I would call it but what actually dragged her down? I knew her and swam often with her stroke for stroke until she pulled a knife from her bikini and opened clams she had tucked away--where I couln't guess but their were only two openings I thought possible or were there three? I was a catholic and numbers were confusing after the second commandment but the author by first name was Ian and what in heck was the name of that movie?
"Interiors," 1978; Diane Keaton, Geraldine Paige. A real bummer, but definitely cerebreal.
hmmmm

Virginia Beach, VA

#12 Aug 20, 2008
Maybe bernie and the ponderless should get a room already and we won't have to listen eithers rantings.
Ponderer

United States

#13 Aug 20, 2008
I have to say that this story provoked a lot of thought for me around the issue of death and the meaning of life, and I was merely hoping to open up an interesting dialogue about death in this country, death in general, the meaning of death and life to us as individuals, etc.

This is a very profound and timeless question.

Wonder where/what the first recognition of death occurred in conversation, and wonder how that conversation went. Neanderthal graves were found with flowers thrown in with the dead one, thus an indication of recognition of an individual.

To bring a bit of irreverent but relevant humor to the subject I'll quote/paraphrase Woody Allen on this issue: "I don't have a problem with death. I just don't want to be there when it happens."

I pray for all of us that we go out with a smile on our faces and a happy thought or memory in our minds. Perhaps a snippit of a musical phrase; the sound of a songbird; the remembrance of the smile of a loved-one; the look of a setting sun shining, back-lighted, through a blade of grass or a beloved's ear; the taste of fresh milk; the fragrance of beloved's hair.
bernie

Cobleskill, NY

#14 Aug 21, 2008
Ponderer wrote:
I have to say that this story provoked a lot of thought for me around the issue of death and the meaning of life, and I was merely hoping to open up an interesting dialogue about death in this country, death in general, the meaning of death and life to us as individuals, etc.
This is a very profound and timeless question.
Wonder where/what the first recognition of death occurred in conversation, and wonder how that conversation went. Neanderthal graves were found with flowers thrown in with the dead one, thus an indication of recognition of an individual.
To bring a bit of irreverent but relevant humor to the subject I'll quote/paraphrase Woody Allen on this issue: "I don't have a problem with death. I just don't want to be there when it happens."
I pray for all of us that we go out with a smile on our faces and a happy thought or memory in our minds. Perhaps a snippit of a musical phrase; the sound of a songbird; the remembrance of the smile of a loved-one; the look of a setting sun shining, back-lighted, through a blade of grass or a beloved's ear; the taste of fresh milk; the fragrance of beloved's hair.
I felt you stated your thoughts well, yet I'll need a safe haven for saying so. Those that have been told the cancer they have is terminal---from three different expert sources, you crawl tentatively back into the history that was yourself---could take hours--days of recalling your finest and your worst moments, all equally memorous, sifting through time periods, re-examaning, editing recall, adding nuances but in all, those finer filaments of your life supercede those darker moments. The lady from Schroon Lake unlike people like myself didn't have the luxury of circumspect but I guarantee her thoughts were on the sweet sublime, a fast forward to all those neatly arranged nooks and crannies in her mind where only the good was cherished and saved. My apoligies for those offended. I was erronously referring to an old movie. Bad time--bad taste.
bernie

Cobleskill, NY

#15 Aug 21, 2008
Offensive wrote:
What a comment to make about a recently deceased person. No malcontent? Right. Your God bless her thrown in at the end doesn't excuse your comment.
No it doesn't. Mea culpa, mea culpa mea maxima culpa.
Ponderer

United States

#16 Aug 21, 2008
bernie wrote:
<quoted text>I felt you stated your thoughts well, yet I'll need a safe haven for saying so. Those that have been told the cancer they have is terminal---from three different expert sources, you crawl tentatively back into the history that was yourself---could take hours--days of recalling your finest and your worst moments, all equally memorous, sifting through time periods, re-examaning, editing recall, adding nuances but in all, those finer filaments of your life supercede those darker moments. The lady from Schroon Lake unlike people like myself didn't have the luxury of circumspect but I guarantee her thoughts were on the sweet sublime, a fast forward to all those neatly arranged nooks and crannies in her mind where only the good was cherished and saved. My apoligies for those offended. I was erronously referring to an old movie. Bad time--bad taste.
Good for you, bernie. Wishing you well, LC.

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