Ordination of gays prompts Episcopal nuns in Catonsville to leave...

Sep 5, 2009 Full story: The Baltimore Sun 30

In a move that religious scholars say is unprecedented, 10 of the 12 nuns at an Episcopal convent in Catonsville left their church on Thursday to become Roman Catholics, the latest defectors from a denomination divided over the ordination of gay men and women.

Full Story
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Since: Dec 07

Location hidden

#1 Sep 5, 2009
"Our church left us," Deborah Conyers said. "It has diluted the message to suit everyone. Luckily the joy of Catholicism balanced the sadness of leaving where we had been."

This is what happens when you belong to a faith where you vote on your salvation. Just a few years ago homosexuality was a sin in almost all Christian religions. Then people started voting on what their faith should be.

“Protestant, Gay, Libertarian”

Since: Apr 08

Long Island, NY

#3 Sep 5, 2009
NiteClerk wrote:
"Our church left us," Deborah Conyers said. "It has diluted the message to suit everyone. Luckily the joy of Catholicism balanced the sadness of leaving where we had been."
This is what happens when you belong to a faith where you vote on your salvation. Just a few years ago homosexuality was a sin in almost all Christian religions. Then people started voting on what their faith should be.
THAT'S democracy !

:)

Most Protestant churches are democratic.

The Roman Catholic Church is a dictatorship.

Which do you think is more American ?

:)

“YESHUA IS LORD”

Since: Apr 07

GAWGIA (GEORGIA)

#4 Sep 6, 2009
NiteClerk wrote:
"Our church left us," Deborah Conyers said. "It has diluted the message to suit everyone. Luckily the joy of Catholicism balanced the sadness of leaving where we had been."
This is what happens when you belong to a faith where you vote on your salvation. Just a few years ago homosexuality was a sin in almost all Christian religions. Then people started voting on what their faith should be.
So now those heifers can now become VESTAL VIRGINS like the rest of those so called nuns now that they've become Cath a licks.

“... truth will out.”

Since: May 08

Stratford, Connecticut.

#5 Sep 6, 2009
Daniel P from Long Island wrote:
<quoted text>
THAT'S democracy !
:)
Most Protestant churches are democratic.
The Roman Catholic Church is a dictatorship.
Which do you think is more American ?
:)
During the Jesus Seminar, many scholars -- including prominent Episcopalians -- used colored marbles to vote on the veracity of the word of God in the Gospels, i.e., which words Jesus said, might have said, couldn't possibly have said, etc.

Do you think this kind of democracey can declare what Jesus actually said and meant?

Since: Dec 07

Location hidden

#6 Sep 6, 2009
Daniel P from Long Island wrote:
<quoted text>
THAT'S democracy !
:)
Most Protestant churches are democratic.
The Roman Catholic Church is a dictatorship.
Which do you think is more American ?
:)
But when you are dealing with religion, the Word of God is not up for a vote. Or it should not be up for a vote. Maybe I should start a church that says it's okay to be a drunken, wife beating adulturer. As long as the members vote and agree on it then we can claim that that being a drunken, wife beating adulturer is just a modern, liberal interpretation of scripture.

Since you think that voting is okay in matters of salvation then I suppose that you have no problem with the voting results about gay marriage?

Since: Dec 07

Location hidden

#7 Sep 6, 2009
Joe DeCaro wrote:
<quoted text>
During the Jesus Seminar, many scholars -- including prominent Episcopalians -- used colored marbles to vote on the veracity of the word of God in the Gospels, i.e., which words Jesus said, might have said, couldn't possibly have said, etc.
Do you think this kind of democracey can declare what Jesus actually said and meant?
I had not heard about this until I Bing'ed Jesus Seminar colored marbles. What a great way to create your doctrine.

“Protestant, Gay, Libertarian”

Since: Apr 08

Long Island, NY

#9 Sep 6, 2009
NiteClerk wrote:
<quoted text>
But when you are dealing with religion, the Word of God is not up for a vote. Or it should not be up for a vote. Maybe I should start a church that says it's okay to be a drunken, wife beating adulturer. As long as the members vote and agree on it then we can claim that that being a drunken, wife beating adulturer is just a modern, liberal interpretation of scripture.
Since you think that voting is okay in matters of salvation then I suppose that you have no problem with the voting results about gay marriage?
The Lutheran Church (ELCA) just voted to allow partnered gay pastors to be rostered.

Civil marriage, which is separate from religious marriage is a Constitutional Right (Loving v. Virginia, 1967).

Constitutional Rights are NOT subject to a popular vote. That's one of the main reasons for having a written constitution in the first place.

Churches SHOULD BE democratic institutions. MOST Protestant churches have written constitutions and are democratic institutions.

The Roman Catholic Church is NOT a democracy. It's a dictatorship of one man, whom the members of the congregation have no say in choosing.

“Brains: Use 'em or lose 'em”

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#10 Sep 6, 2009
Joe DeCaro wrote:
<quoted text>
During the Jesus Seminar, many scholars -- including prominent Episcopalians -- used colored marbles to vote on the veracity of the word of God in the Gospels, i.e., which words Jesus said, might have said, couldn't possibly have said, etc.
Do you think this kind of democracey can declare what Jesus actually said and meant?
Does it really matter if a fairy tale is handed to you from on high or if it is accepted in a mutual decision? NO ONE can prove what Jesus said, thought, believed, or even his existence.

“Protestant, Gay, Libertarian”

Since: Apr 08

Long Island, NY

#11 Sep 6, 2009
BEE33 wrote:
<quoted text>Does it really matter if a fairy tale is handed to you from on high or if it is accepted in a mutual decision? NO ONE can prove what Jesus said, thought, believed, or even his existence.
I would dispute this. With many people, both religious and secular, it cannot be "proven" that they existed (It depends entirely on what you accept as "proof".)

And although it cannot be "proven" that Aristotle, Hipparchus, Marc Antony, William Shakespeare, etc, existed, very few people doubt that they did exist and did the things that people say they did.

MUCH of the things in our daily life we take on faith.

Can you "prove" that Obama is POTUS ? Or do you just accept that on faith because people told you that ? Where is your "proof" ?

Many people found guilty of a crime, because physical "proof" was presented in court, have later ben found to be innocent, as we all know.

Be careful using the word "prove". It is often difficult to "prove" things in everyday life. MOST things we accept on faith.

“... truth will out.”

Since: May 08

Stratford, Connecticut.

#12 Sep 6, 2009
BEE33 wrote:
... NO ONE can prove what Jesus said, thought, believed, or even his existence.
Jesus' existance was not only verified via eye-witness accounts recorded in the gospels, but by contemporary secular writers as well.

“Brains: Use 'em or lose 'em”

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#13 Sep 6, 2009
Joe DeCaro wrote:
<quoted text>
Jesus' existance was not only verified via eye-witness accounts recorded in the gospels, but by contemporary secular writers as well.
Check again. Josephus and others were recording hearsay. The gospels were written generations after Jesus presumably lived.

“Brains: Use 'em or lose 'em”

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#14 Sep 6, 2009
Daniel P from Long Island wrote:
<quoted text>
I would dispute this. With many people, both religious and secular, it cannot be "proven" that they existed (It depends entirely on what you accept as "proof".)
And although it cannot be "proven" that Aristotle, Hipparchus, Marc Antony, William Shakespeare, etc, existed, very few people doubt that they did exist and did the things that people say they did.
MUCH of the things in our daily life we take on faith.
Can you "prove" that Obama is POTUS ? Or do you just accept that on faith because people told you that ? Where is your "proof" ?
Many people found guilty of a crime, because physical "proof" was presented in court, have later ben found to be innocent, as we all know.
Be careful using the word "prove". It is often difficult to "prove" things in everyday life. MOST things we accept on faith.
I know perfectly well what 'proof' means, thank you. If you want to accept the story on faith, it's fine by me. Just don't expect me to follow there.

“Protestant, Gay, Libertarian”

Since: Apr 08

Long Island, NY

#15 Sep 6, 2009
Joe DeCaro wrote:
<quoted text>
Jesus' existance was not only verified via eye-witness accounts recorded in the gospels, but by contemporary secular writers as well.
I know Josephus wrote about him, but I don't know about anyone else.

But it doesn't matter.

One of the main doctrines of Christianity is FAITH.

One who has FAITH does not need PROOF.

“... truth will out.”

Since: May 08

Stratford, Connecticut.

#16 Sep 6, 2009
Daniel P from Long Island wrote:
<quoted text>
I know Josephus wrote about him, but I don't know about anyone else ...
Pliny.

“... truth will out.”

Since: May 08

Stratford, Connecticut.

#17 Sep 6, 2009
BEE33 wrote:
... The gospels were written generations after Jesus presumably lived.
Matthew AD 60-65
Mark AD 55-65
Luke AD 60
John AD 85-90

And for someone who only "presumably lived," Jesus made quite an impression for Himself.

"He was born in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman. Until He was thirty, He worked in a carpenter shop and then for three years He was an itinerant preacher.

He wrote no books. He held no office. He never had a family or owned a home. He didn't go to college. He never travelled two hundred miles from the place He was born. He had no credentials but Himself.

He never did any of the things that usually accompany greatness.

The authorities condemned His teachings. His friends deserted Him. One denied Him. One betrayed Him to His enemies for a paltry sum, the price of a slave.

He went through the mockery of a trial.

He was nailed upon a cross between two thieves. While He was dying, His executioners gambled for the only piece of property He owned on earth: His coat. When He was dead He was taken down and laid in a borrowed grave.

Nineteen centuries have come and gone, yet today He is the crowning glory of the human race, the adored leader of hundreds of millions of the earth's inhabitants.

All the armies that ever marched and all the navies that ever sailed and all the parliaments that ever sat and all the kings that ever reigned, put together, have not affected the life of man upon this earth as much as that One Solitary Life."

“Protestant, Gay, Libertarian”

Since: Apr 08

Long Island, NY

#18 Sep 6, 2009
Joe DeCaro wrote:
<quoted text>
Matthew AD 60-65
Mark AD 55-65
Luke AD 60
John AD 85-90
And for someone who only "presumably lived," Jesus made quite an impression for Himself.
"He was born in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman. Until He was thirty, He worked in a carpenter shop and then for three years He was an itinerant preacher.
He wrote no books. He held no office. He never had a family or owned a home. He didn't go to college. He never travelled two hundred miles from the place He was born. He had no credentials but Himself.
He never did any of the things that usually accompany greatness.
The authorities condemned His teachings. His friends deserted Him. One denied Him. One betrayed Him to His enemies for a paltry sum, the price of a slave.
He went through the mockery of a trial.
He was nailed upon a cross between two thieves. While He was dying, His executioners gambled for the only piece of property He owned on earth: His coat. When He was dead He was taken down and laid in a borrowed grave.
Nineteen centuries have come and gone, yet today He is the crowning glory of the human race, the adored leader of hundreds of millions of the earth's inhabitants.
All the armies that ever marched and all the navies that ever sailed and all the parliaments that ever sat and all the kings that ever reigned, put together, have not affected the life of man upon this earth as much as that One Solitary Life."
I remember your quote from years ago.

Who wrote it ?

“Protestant, Gay, Libertarian”

Since: Apr 08

Long Island, NY

#20 Sep 6, 2009
Delaware wrote:
<quoted text>You don't understand, because you aren't a Christian.
The Bible condemns all homosexual acts. No Christian church can affirm such behavior.
You're obviously wrong because the Lutheran Church just voted to do so.

:)

“Brains: Use 'em or lose 'em”

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#21 Sep 6, 2009
Joe DeCaro wrote:
<quoted text>
Matthew AD 60-65
Mark AD 55-65
Luke AD 60
John AD 85-90
And for someone who only "presumably lived," Jesus made quite an impression for Himself.
"He was born in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman. Until He was thirty, He worked in a carpenter shop and then for three years He was an itinerant preacher.
He wrote no books. He held no office. He never had a family or owned a home. He didn't go to college. He never travelled two hundred miles from the place He was born. He had no credentials but Himself.
He never did any of the things that usually accompany greatness.
The authorities condemned His teachings. His friends deserted Him. One denied Him. One betrayed Him to His enemies for a paltry sum, the price of a slave.
He went through the mockery of a trial.
He was nailed upon a cross between two thieves. While He was dying, His executioners gambled for the only piece of property He owned on earth: His coat. When He was dead He was taken down and laid in a borrowed grave.
Nineteen centuries have come and gone, yet today He is the crowning glory of the human race, the adored leader of hundreds of millions of the earth's inhabitants.
All the armies that ever marched and all the navies that ever sailed and all the parliaments that ever sat and all the kings that ever reigned, put together, have not affected the life of man upon this earth as much as that One Solitary Life."
Like I said GENERATIONS AFTER Jesus' presumed lifetime. I think your dates are skewed a bit early. Also, generations were shorter then, average lifespan being about 25 then.,

http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Average_...

so the Jewish habit of proclaiming 13 year olds adults (and eligible for marriage) makes sense in light of this fact. So even if your suspect dates were correct, even the earliest text would be, like I said, written generations after the purported events, making it EXTREMELY UNLIKELY that even the earliest was anything like an eyewitness report.

“Protestant, Gay, Libertarian”

Since: Apr 08

Long Island, NY

#22 Sep 6, 2009
BEE33 wrote:
<quoted text>Like I said GENERATIONS AFTER Jesus' presumed lifetime. I think your dates are skewed a bit early. Also, generations were shorter then, average lifespan being about 25 then.,
http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Average_...
so the Jewish habit of proclaiming 13 year olds adults (and eligible for marriage) makes sense in light of this fact. So even if your suspect dates were correct, even the earliest text would be, like I said, written generations after the purported events, making it EXTREMELY UNLIKELY that even the earliest was anything like an eyewitness report.
I minored in theology in college and I concur with your analysis.

Also, because of another recent dispute on here about the authorship of the 5 New Testament books attributed to "John", I asked my pastor today after church about the authorship of the "John" books.

He confirmed to me what I as taught in my church and in theology classes at college, namely that the consensus among theological scholars is that there were at least 3, and probably more, authors of the Gospel, the 3 epistles, and the Revelation, all attributed to "John".

This doesn't diminish their truthfulness or value, but certainly helps to illuminate our understanding of biblical times.

PEACE !

“Brains: Use 'em or lose 'em”

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#23 Sep 6, 2009
Daniel P from Long Island wrote:
<quoted text>
I minored in theology in college and I concur with your analysis.
Also, because of another recent dispute on here about the authorship of the 5 New Testament books attributed to "John", I asked my pastor today after church about the authorship of the "John" books.
He confirmed to me what I as taught in my church and in theology classes at college, namely that the consensus among theological scholars is that there were at least 3, and probably more, authors of the Gospel, the 3 epistles, and the Revelation, all attributed to "John".
This doesn't diminish their truthfulness or value, but certainly helps to illuminate our understanding of biblical times.
PEACE !
What you say about John is reminiscent of what I've heard said of Homer, that what we think of as a personal name may have been used as sort of an honorific title. Subsequent parties interested in similar topics may have adopted the name for themselves or been 'awarded' it.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Catonsville Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Review: United National Moving and Storage (Mar '14) Sep 12 Julie Lockwood 28
Fulton community to testify against proposed co... Sep 10 ctider 1
Brooklyn Park residents get educated on gang ac... (Oct '09) Sep 5 pico 9
Brekford Launches Body-Worn Evidence Video System Sep 5 Cephas01 1
Milford Mill students get a boost before they g... Aug '14 jbzook 2
Fight erupts outside Randallstown High graduation Aug '14 jbzook 2
Competition for snowball stands heats up Aug '14 Ynette 1
Catonsville Dating

more search filters

less search filters

Catonsville Jobs

Catonsville People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Catonsville News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Catonsville

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]