Windish or Slovenian? Another side of the story -- themorningca...

Full story: The Morning Call

''Residents of the Steelton area near Harrisburg distinguish themselves as Windish, not Slovenian.

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enoe

United States

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#1
Jul 26, 2007
 
I do not understand why the new goal is to try and correct something instead of holding it close to heart. Tradition another lost word in the new era along with respect. We are a generation moving away from our roots instead of embracing them. I only hope that the old truths will not be lost forever.

“Love it or Hate it!”

Since: Mar 07

Northampton

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#2
Jul 26, 2007
 
I am member of St. John's Windish and I am happy to say I have Windish roots. I embrace my family roots and will pass that on to my two small children who were also baptised at St. John's as well. I love my family history and will always cherish it. I still have family members who speak Windish and try to teach my children a few simple words.
enoe wrote:
I do not understand why the new goal is to try and correct something instead of holding it close to heart. Tradition another lost word in the new era along with respect. We are a generation moving away from our roots instead of embracing them. I only hope that the old truths will not be lost forever.
Roberta Windish

United States

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#3
Jul 27, 2007
 
The Windish Road near Huffs Church is named that way because Jeff Windish, who had worked at the mill across the street, lived on that road. It was so named when everyone needed a street address due to 911 use. He no longer lives there. His mother and father, Joe and Beulah, live in the village of Huffs Church. We do not know anything about "Windish" of which you talk about in your article. Our name is Windish. That's it. It was originally spelled Windisch when they arrived in America.

“Does it really Matter”

Since: May 07

Sunnyville USA

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#4
Jul 27, 2007
 
Kimmer wrote:
I am member of St. John's Windish and I am happy to say I have Windish roots. I embrace my family roots and will pass that on to my two small children who were also baptised at St. John's as well. I love my family history and will always cherish it. I still have family members who speak Windish and try to teach my children a few simple words.
<quoted text>
My grandmother was Windish. I too have tried to pass on a few of the words to my children. The funny part is, my grandfather was croation and they spoke different languages yet spoke to each other intheri native tounge and communicated perfectly! I often wonder if I am using the correct words...Do you know how I can find this out?
Lynn

United States

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#5
Jul 27, 2007
 
Great Article Uncle Ron
RIP Theresa Belizzi (maiden name Sebjenics)- deceased on Monday, July 23, 2007. A true Windish!
Sincerely,

Lynn Zeiner - Great Great Granddaughter of a Windish Immigrant

“Stop the Polarization”

Since: May 07

Emmaus, PA

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#6
Jul 27, 2007
 
Roberta Windish wrote:
The Windish Road near Huffs Church is named that way because Jeff Windish, who had worked at the mill across the street, lived on that road. It was so named when everyone needed a street address due to 911 use. He no longer lives there. His mother and father, Joe and Beulah, live in the village of Huffs Church. We do not know anything about "Windish" of which you talk about in your article. Our name is Windish. That's it. It was originally spelled Windisch when they arrived in America.
I would be willing to bet that your lineage can be traced back to Windish ancestors, since this is the most probable derivation of your surname. The "-isch" suffix in German is often used on the end of words denoting nationality ("Französisch" = French; "Russisch" = Russian; "Norwegisch" = Norwegian; "Ukrainisch" = Ukrainian, etc.).

“Love it or Hate it!”

Since: Mar 07

Northampton

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#7
Jul 28, 2007
 
I called my great-aunt who speaks Windish and she stated that Croation is very similar to Windish. Albeit they are from different countries. They probably picked up on each others languages very well by being together. My great grandmother was from Hungary but spoke perfect German, I guess back then learning another langauge was not so voodoo as it is today!
doindawash wrote:
<quoted text>
My grandmother was Windish. I too have tried to pass on a few of the words to my children. The funny part is, my grandfather was croation and they spoke different languages yet spoke to each other intheri native tounge and communicated perfectly! I often wonder if I am using the correct words...Do you know how I can find this out?
ASK

Philadelphia, PA

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#8
Aug 7, 2007
 
doindawash wrote:
<quoted text>
My grandmother was Windish. I too have tried to pass on a few of the words to my children. The funny part is, my grandfather was croation and they spoke different languages yet spoke to each other intheri native tounge and communicated perfectly! I often wonder if I am using the correct words...Do you know how I can find this out?
You are almost correct,My neice is currently doing a history of our family and just traced my mothwer back to 1730 there is a gentelman in NY, NY that could help. tk62@verizon.net My father was also windish and that will be next year.
ASK

Philadelphia, PA

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#9
Aug 7, 2007
 
Kimmer wrote:
I called my great-aunt who speaks Windish and she stated that Croation is very similar to Windish. Albeit they are from different countries. They probably picked up on each others languages very well by being together. My great grandmother was from Hungary but spoke perfect German, I guess back then learning another langauge was not so voodoo as it is today!
<quoted text>
See above
ASK

Philadelphia, PA

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#10
Aug 7, 2007
 
I guess I should say St. Joeseph Windish Catholic church on 5th st. Beth
Roberta Windish

United States

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#11
Aug 9, 2007
 
VoiceOfModeration wrote:
<quoted text>
I would be willing to bet that your lineage can be traced back to Windish ancestors, since this is the most probable derivation of your surname. The "-isch" suffix in German is often used on the end of words denoting nationality ("Französisch" = French; "Russisch" = Russian; "Norwegisch" = Norwegian; "Ukrainisch" = Ukrainian, etc.).
Do you know anything about "the old country"? I have our ancestry traced back to the two individuals who came over to the states and the names of the towns. I would like to know where the towns are located.

“Stop the Polarization”

Since: May 07

Emmaus, PA

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#12
Aug 14, 2007
 
Roberta Windish wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you know anything about "the old country"? I have our ancestry traced back to the two individuals who came over to the states and the names of the towns. I would like to know where the towns are located.
Hi, Roberta,

If your ancestors immigrated from Germany, I may be able to help you with place names. My ancestors mostly came from the Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) area of Germany. It seems likely that the Windish family acquired the surname in a German-speaking region of Europe after having migrated from a Windish region, as a way of identifying them. Most surnames were based on four things: geographic origin, nicknames based on physical characteristics, father's name, or occupation.

If your family immigrated directly from Slovenia, I am less likely to be able to help, since I'm not familiar with Slovenian place names, but you might try the following Slovenian genealogy links, where you can find message boards to place queries and maybe find someone knowledgable about the towns you mentioned:

http://www.sloveniangenealogy.org/
http://www2.arnes.si/~rzjtopl/rod/rod-an.htm
http://www.rootsweb.com/~svnwgw/index.htm
http://genealogy.ijp.si/
Windish and Proud

Allentown, PA

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#13
Aug 4, 2008
 
Kimmer wrote:
I am member of St. John's Windish and I am happy to say I have Windish roots. I embrace my family roots and will pass that on to my two small children who were also baptised at St. John's as well. I love my family history and will always cherish it. I still have family members who speak Windish and try to teach my children a few simple words.
<quoted text>
All too late, I took an interest in my windish heritage. Sadly, I did not pay attention when my grandmother tried to teach me a few words. I am soon to be a grandmother, and I would love my grandson to call me grandmother in Windish. I'd dearly like to know how to say grandmother in windish. I'd appreciate all the help I can get in this matter.
Screwy Louie

Bethlehem, PA

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#14
Aug 5, 2008
 
Windish and Proud wrote:
<quoted text>
All too late, I took an interest in my windish heritage. Sadly, I did not pay attention when my grandmother tried to teach me a few words. I am soon to be a grandmother, and I would love my grandson to call me grandmother in Windish. I'd dearly like to know how to say grandmother in windish. I'd appreciate all the help I can get in this matter.
Its almost universal.."BABA"
Reader

Sparta, NJ

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#15
Aug 5, 2008
 
doindawash wrote:
<quoted text>
My grandmother was Windish.
Maybe it was the cabbage.
Keep Windish Alive

Whitehall, PA

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#16
Aug 18, 2008
 
Bethlehem, PA - I am trying to find my roots - especially on my mother's side. Her mother and father came to America at the turn of the century. The last name is Pintarich. They settled in Bethlehem. My grandfather, Joseph, and grandmother, Theresa spoke Windish, Hungarian, German and other languages. I remember when we were kids we used to always ask our mother where did the Windish people come from? We thought "Windland". But now, by the grace of God, I can talk to other Windish people and get that answer. I am very big on tradition and hope to learn as much as possible, including the Windish language and foods, to keep my mother's legacy going on. It is the least I can do for her.
Dustin Windish

Williamstown, NJ

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#17
Oct 10, 2008
 
My last name is windish does that have anything do with being windish? Because my family is from Northern Pennsylvani
Sali

Wayne, NJ

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#18
Oct 19, 2008
 
Screwy Louie wrote:
<quoted text>Its almost universal.."BABA"
moodesla means cold. Dont really know how to spell it but just sound it out. Nekaney means "nothing"
STAMPAR

Ryde, Australia

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#19
Dec 12, 2009
 
Hi to all my Windish friends,

Currently in the illegal republic of slovenia Windishpeoples are being supressed in many ways. Violence against the Windish is spreading through slovenia.

Slovenia is not really a country and has no history. Parts of it actually belong to Italy, Austria and Croatia.
Kozak

Smithfield, PA

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#20
Dec 16, 2009
 
Screwy Louie wrote:
<quoted text>Its almost universal.."BABA"
Pretty much universal among Slavic peoples.

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