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1961 Alumni Rolla MO

Rolla, MO

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#43
Oct 6, 2011
 
Random Reader wrote:
The tax is not because the Post Office is hurting financially. And yes, they are in a bind because the government owes them money, just as it owes a lot of people money.
The tax was suggested since email travels over a national communications infrastructure, that was built using federal subsidies.
We pay taxes on gas to help fund the federally subsidized roads we drive on, why not pay taxes on the emails that we send across federally subsidized wires? Same situation, different media.
And on a sidenote. Yes, the Postal Service shortfalls were caused by a bill enacted by a Republican Congress, signed by a Republican President.
Thank you, Random Reader!

Glad to know there are still some Topix users smart enough to know the real truth behind the US Postal Service shortfalls.

And yes, I also belive there should be a tax on e-mails!
1961 Alumni Rolla MO

Rolla, MO

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#44
Oct 6, 2011
 
Jerry wrote:
The reason why The Republicans wanna privatize The Post office? MONEY plain and simple...Someone will BUY the post office system for Pennies on the dollar if it does get privatized..Probably A person who donated big money to A POTUS campaign. U Will pay A dollar for A letter when this happens...People complain about the post office but usually have NO clue as to what goes on, Moving Billions of letters and box's in days for 40 cents A letter and pennies per pound for box's takes it toll on Trucks machines and people...This is Just something else for people out here to BITCH at ..Boo Hoo my Tax's are to High, Kill all of the Govt, To much Govt intrusion, On and On...You will BITCH if its Privatized and complain that you wanted to Keep it under Federal control...It seems MOST out here are not Happy unless there Bitching!!!!
As I said before, privatizing the US Postal Service would be UNCONSTITUTIONAL! Yes that's right - it would take nothing short of a Constitutional amendment to put it into the hands of the private sector...

For anyone who does not believe this - just check our US Constitution!!!
guest

United States

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#45
Oct 6, 2011
 
1961 Alumni Rolla MO wrote:
<quoted text>
As I said before, privatizing the US Postal Service would be UNCONSTITUTIONAL! Yes that's right - it would take nothing short of a Constitutional amendment to put it into the hands of the private sector...
For anyone who does not believe this - just check our US Constitution!!!
YOU LIE
RL Abilene

Apo, AE

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#46
Nov 4, 2011
 
1961 Alumni Rolla MO wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh, I'm sure UPS & FedEx are doing just great!
Any company would do great if they cherry-picked and bypassed the smaller towns and communities like UPS & FedEx does. Yes, UPS & FedEx are doing just great raking in the big bucks in those larger cities.
But, just where does that leave the small towns where people have to drive 20-40 miles to even find a UPS or FedEX office??? How much of a hardship does this put on people in an already tight economy considering the high cost of transportation & gas?
And just how small will FedEx and UPS not deliver to? Seems to me C'ville is not a growing metropolis....but even back when i was living at home....out in the country mind you...we always got our deliveries from UPS and/or FedEX. So what is the argument now. And let's say we did away with the USPS. Don't you think those small towns that need service would get the service they need in a field where more than one delivery service would be trying to compete for it. And not only that. Let's say that UPS is not providing the service that a town or customer needs....then hey, FedEx comes along andmakes everyone happy. Isn't capitalism great!
RL Abilene

Apo, AE

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#47
Nov 4, 2011
 

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1961 Alumni Rolla MO wrote:
<quoted text>
As I said before, privatizing the US Postal Service would be UNCONSTITUTIONAL! Yes that's right - it would take nothing short of a Constitutional amendment to put it into the hands of the private sector...
For anyone who does not believe this - just check our US Constitution!!!
Umm....just curious here. Tell me where in the US Constitution it says anything about US Postal System and how it would be unlawful to privatize it. I need a quote or reference here. To be honest, I don't know, but I do question it.

“GOP Redistribution is Fascism”

Since: Feb 07

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#48
Nov 4, 2011
 
RL Abilene wrote:
<quoted text>
Umm....just curious here. Tell me where in the US Constitution it says anything about US Postal System and how it would be unlawful to privatize it. I need a quote or reference here. To be honest, I don't know, but I do question it.
Article I, Section 8, Clause 7

It simply grants Congress the right "to establish Post Offices and post Roads".

There's nothing in the language that says Congress can't authorize this to be done by private entities. This is a right reserved for Congress, not "We the People" so Congress would probably have a lot of latitude here. But that's just my guess. I could be wrong.
Louis Russo

Staten Island, NY

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#49
Dec 4, 2011
 
It could be privatized - but the private entity would have to agree to deliver to every mailbox in the US.

Otherwise you could have a successful equal protection argument.
mfero

Seattle, WA

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#50
Mar 23, 2012
 
If the republicans prevail, America will be the only industrialized nation without a postal system.

Commercial outfits will not make deliveries to unprofitable addresses (i.e., rural).

Although much has changed since the Postal Service was created, many things are still delivered by post and will remain so for the forseeable future.

To those who viscerally hate the government, be careful what you wish for.
love the postal service

Spring Grove, IL

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#51
Sep 23, 2012
 
People are in need of the postal service to receive mail inexpensively, timely, and to all areas, including rural areas. Areas where other businesses fail to go. No money made in rural areas. The problems The United States Postal Service has are a direct result of our government. Knowing the government, they probably want to take the 75 years of prepay for its retirees to use to redistribute.
Support the Constitution

United States

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#52
Feb 17, 2013
 
Constitutionally the Post Office can not be privatize. Under the constitution Congress has the duty and responsibility under oath to establish post offices and post roads. If this section of the Constitution can be deleted, then it will be just as easy for the First or Second Amemdment or any amendment to be overlooked a deleted.

This is how the Constitution reads:

The Constitution of the United States of America

Article 1, Section 8.[Scope of Legislative Power], Line 7 Ė To establish post offices and post roads;

Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution makes it the duty and responsibility of all our elected representatives by oath to defend the Constitution of the United States.

To privatize the Post Office would therefore be Unconstitutional. Members of Congress can not pick and choose which part of the Constitution they should defend.
Support the Constitution

United States

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#53
Feb 17, 2013
 
Carlton McLemore wrote:
<quoted text>
Article I, Section 8, Clause 7
It simply grants Congress the right "to establish Post Offices and post Roads".
There's nothing in the language that says Congress can't authorize this to be done by private entities. This is a right reserved for Congress, not "We the People" so Congress would probably have a lot of latitude here. But that's just my guess. I could be wrong.
We have to remember that Congress are elected representatives and "We the People" are there employers. We can argue that the Second Amendment: "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed." The language states "A well regulated militia", but as citizens we honor the intent of the amendment and defend the right to bear arms.

We honor the intent of Article I, Section 8, Clause 7, that Congress defends the intent of this article as it has since Benjamin Franklin became the first Postmaster General
WILLIE RUSHING

Westchester, IL

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#54
Jan 25, 2014
 
GDI wrote:
The post office will close hundreds of post offices this next year , some in pemiscot county.
I RETIRED FROM THE POSTAL SERVICES.I DO NOT KNOW ANYONE MAKING $80,000 PER YEAR IN THE POSTAL SERVICE.THERE ARE A LOT OF CONTRACT EMPLOYEES IN IRAQ AND PAKISTAN,MAKING A LOT MORE.THEY WERE PUT THERE BY THE GOP

“Ignorance is not Patriotism.”

Since: Dec 11

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#55
Jan 25, 2014
 

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guest wrote:
Who really gives a fuck. If the USPS goes out of business, a private company will fill the gap, make it profitable and all those overpaid union members will be gone. That is why everyone is bitching. The union free ride at the expense of the USPS will be gone.
Instead of it being that Union members are making too much money, maybe it should be non union members are not making enough money. Just a thought.
If the GOP would stop trying to bankrupt the postal service ,they would be just fine. But that's the GOP for you,always looking out for the rich guys and screwing the working man.
guest

Fort Worth, TX

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#56
Jan 26, 2014
 
It is not only republicans, it is everyone who has even an ounce of brains between their ears. The USPS is a failure. It is that simple.

The United States Postal Service has been running at a loss for years now. Things cannot continue as they are, and there are several options that the Postal Service and our government can adopt to solve the problem. What is the problem? What does it mean for us? How do we solve it? This article will attempt to answer these questions by taking stock of the factors undermining the postal service, looking into the history that brought these problems about, and examining the solutions other countries have adopted.

Before we discuss the problems, we must ask how the Postal Service affects us. First, is the financial (in)solvency of the USPS a tax burden? The answer is technically no, but practically yes. In 1970, Congress passed the Postal Reorganization Act, which made the USPS an agency independent of the Federal Government (before, it had been a department of the executive branch, the Post Office Department). As such, it was to be financially self-sufficient, and received no annual appropriation from federal tax revenues. However, in the last decade, it has taken out loans from the U.S. Treasury to compensate for recent losses, and itís current outstanding debt is nearly $15 billion (itís official debt ceiling). This should not be surprising, but it is far from the worst bailout in recent history.

Second, what would happen if USPS went bankrupt? It would mean an immediate cessation in the delivery of letters, because the USPS has a legal monopoly on this activity. It is illegal for any non-postal worker to deliver the mail (packages/parcels are exempt).

So, why is this happening? The losses incurred by the USPS stem from a convergence of
several hardships. First, mail volume has decreased by 20% since 2006 Ė there is now more junk mail delivered than normal mail Ė presumably due to increased use of e-mail and the internet. Second, the USPS operates under a Universal Service Obligation (USO), which means two things: it must serve all addresses in the U.S., and it must serve them at a universal, cheap (sub-market) price. On account of this, it is estimated that 80% of the ~36,000 post offices in the US run at a loss. Third, the postal workers unions, such as the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC) and the American Postal Workersí Union (APWU), are the dominant forces shaping USPS financial policy. About 80% of USPS revenue goes to employee wages, compared with FedExís 43% and UPSís 61%. In addition, the USPS has agreed in union contracts to pay for 79% of itís employeesí health care, compared with the standard 72% for federal workers. Fourth, the USPS is subject to Congressional oversight that prevents it from using its discretion to adapt to market conditions, and is prohibited from making a profit or entering markets unrelated to mail.
Some argue that more recent hardships, such as the economic recession and, especially, a 2006 Congressional mandate that the USPS pay $5.5 billion annually into future retiree pensions, are more immediately threatening. However, since both Postmaster General Patrick Donahue and many of the unions agree that the pension payments are a bizarre and unsustainable expense, Congress will likely relax its mandate.

But what about the other problems? Donahoe is making every attempt to reduce costs within the given framework. Some make sense, but many compromise the USO, including: a raise in postage rates by 29% since 2001; closing 3,700 of the costliest post offices; and eliminating Saturday service. The latter two still await Congressional approval (this could change by the time this article is printed). If they pass, the USPS can only pretend to continue offering universal service. If they donít, the USPS will continue to lose revenue until it must be bailed out with taxpayer money.
guest

Fort Worth, TX

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#57
Jan 26, 2014
 
That is, unless Congress adopts this solution: 1) remove the USPSís monopoly on mail delivery, 2) remove regulations on and privileges enjoyed by the USPS which do not apply to competitors like FedEx and UPS, and 3) relieve the USPS of itís universal service obligation, or at least redefine the USO so that the USPS is only required to provide mail service for citizens who have not or cannot select a private mailing alternative.

All of these steps go hand in hand. The reason that the USPS is subject to so much regulation and oversight is because these were the conditions on which it was granted itís monopoly, in lieu of competition and to balance out the privileges it enjoys (no federal taxes). No monopoly means no reason to regulate it any differently than other businesses in the industry, and the USPS could have the same flexibility as their competitors in adapting to market conditions. Also, the monopoly was conferred so that it would have the market access necessary to meet its USO. No USO, no need for a monopoly.

Many believe the elimination of the monopoly would be detrimental to citizens because they see mail delivery as an essential service that can only be reliably supplied by the government. Besides the fact that the USO is tenable only as a contribution to the federal deficit, as demonstrated above, and that the status of mail as an ďessentialĒ service is plummeting rapidly, the argument is flawed because it assumes that a single organization must be responsible for universal service. A newly privatized USPS will start out with 100% of the letter delivery market. Any reduction from that is necessarily an improvement for citizens, because it means that those who turned away have found a more suitable alternative mail service otherwise unavailable during the monopoly. Thus, service distribution is not only maintained, but it is also improved by allowing competitors to take up some of the service.

Postal privatization has worked in Europe. Sweden became one of the first countries to open its postal service, Posten, to competition in 1993, adopting provisions similar to those outlined above. Germany was quick to follow in 1994. These governments require the privatized postal departments to maintain their USO, primarily to ensure that rural residents maintain access to postage rates comparable to urban residents, despite the increased cost of delivery to remote locations.(Whether or not a market solution to the problem of rural delivery exists is a debate for another time.) But the legal monopolies are gone, and competitors have moved in to satisfy niche markets. Allowed to freely innovate, the businesses have decreased costs by moving their operations and employment into supermarkets and banks, and brought themselves up to speed with new telecommunications technologies by offering increased online and cell-phone services to replace traditional mail services.
guest

Fort Worth, TX

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#58
Jan 26, 2014
 
WILLIE RUSHING wrote:
<quoted text> I RETIRED FROM THE POSTAL SERVICES.I DO NOT KNOW ANYONE MAKING $80,000 PER YEAR IN THE POSTAL SERVICE.THERE ARE A LOT OF CONTRACT EMPLOYEES IN IRAQ AND PAKISTAN,MAKING A LOT MORE.THEY WERE PUT THERE BY THE GOP
Maybe not in wages but in wages and benefits it would be.

Compensation
Postal Service salaries vary by job duty. According to PayScale, Postal Service mail carriers earned a median salary of $50,888 in 2009. Mail processing clerks earned a median salary of $50,914. The highest paying jobs in the Postal Service are those of postmasters and mail superintendents, who earned a median salary of $70,541 in 2009.
Most Postal Service employees receive regular compensation increases. Additionally, Postal Service employees earn more for working night shifts, Sundays and any overtime.

Insurance
The Postal Service offers health insurance through the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program. The government pays most of the premiums for its workers' insurance policies. Postal Service employees also receive life insurance policies through the Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) progam.

Time Off
The Postal Service offers 10 paid holidays per year to employees. Employees are also entitled to paid vacations. For the first three years a person is employed full time by the Postal Service, he receives 13 days of paid vacation. After the three-year mark, vacation is increased to 20 paid days. After 15 years of service, employees are given up to 26 days of vacation. Postal Service employees also receive 13 days of paid sick leave.

Pension
Unlike many private companies, the Postal Service still offers a traditional pension to its employees through the federal retirement program administered through the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

Savings Plans
The Postal Service offers two savings plans. The first is a traditional Flexible Spending Account, which allows employees to save money tax-free in order to pay for health care services and day care. Employees are eligible for this plan after one year of service. The Postal Service also offers a Thrift Savings Plan, a retirement plan in which employees may save money and receive up to 5 percent in matching contributions from the Postal Service.

Sailor

United States

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#59
Feb 3, 2014
 
I would not bother to respond to that inbred imbecile. Did you see where he is from? He shares a mother and sister.....and works on stupidity with the deadly edge of a k-bar.

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