Well there ya go

Cartersville, GA

#21 May 25, 2013
There ya go, folks. It's not the teacher's fault. It's never the teachers. They do nothing wrong so it's the parents at fault. Plus the students at fault.

That is the very problem, is denial of responsibility. No wonder this county is full of dumb teenagers.

Good job, teachers. You're pathetic.
Buzzword

Rome, GA

#22 May 25, 2013
Here is a novel idea: Perhaps there is room for improvement at all points. Parents, work with your kids. Teachers, hunker down and do your job, and stay off your cell phone. Principals, enforce consequences for teachers and students. School Board, clean house!
disgusted

Cartersville, GA

#23 May 25, 2013
Buzzword wrote:
Here is a novel idea: Perhaps there is room for improvement at all points. Parents, work with your kids. Teachers, hunker down and do your job, and stay off your cell phone. Principals, enforce consequences for teachers and students. School Board, clean house!
That is an excellent idea.
Metaphysical

White, GA

#24 May 25, 2013
countysucks wrote:
<quoted text>
metaphysical,
you have shown you are an idiot. You must be a county teacher. when I went to school it was maybe 2 out of 200 that did not graduate. It sure is damn easy to blame it on the students. You
are a loser and thank god my kids go to the city schools. Maybe you forgot about the parents that do care and try, but when you get to middle and high school you have unqualified people that call themselves teachers that could not get a job doing anything else.
My my, you seem to enjoy name-calling when you "think" that someone doesn't support your position. Not a County teacher or a teacher of any kind. I have though insisted that my children do their work on time and make good grades. I recognize that there are some bad teachers, just as I recognize (unlike you apparently) that there are bad students whose parents don't stay behind them and make them do the work required to get the grades. Also, I am one of those who fully support going back to the basics in education, fully recognizing that some people are not cut out for college but would do very well in a technical program, or learning a craft (carpentry, plumbing etc). Please try to be less defensive and a little less inflammatory.
The Oracle

Rome, GA

#25 May 25, 2013
I'm so glad that I live in the City.
Just my Opinion

Conley, GA

#26 May 25, 2013
Some are blaming parents and some are blaming teachers. I have not seen anyone question whether or not the students themselves have a role to play in the question! Some kids have good teachers and good parents, and just don't care about their own education. They think they will graduate just doing the least they can get by with.
Go Figure

Cartersville, GA

#27 May 25, 2013
If in fact it's the teachers, why is no one arguing that maybe the teacher was to rigorous and the student failed? Wouldn't it be easier to to simply pass the student to raise the graduation rate? Graduation tests are a thing of the past so really all the student has to do is pass the class. Seriously, a kid can't make a 70? Which in fact would probably be more like a 60 due to the catering and extra chances that kids get.

Also, there is a direct correlation between attendance and graduation rate. Is missing 30+ days a year the teachers fault? You look at the ones that don't graduate and you will see high absences, lot's of discipline, etc.

In addition, what if a student drops out ( and there are many between the 3 high schools)? Some may not know how the graduation rate is determined, but when you include an entering 9th grader who drops out before the 12 grade it counts agaisnt you. Is that the teachers fault?

We all know there are bad teachers, but pointing the finger only at teachers and not the parents and/or the economics of the child and his/her family is not very accurate.

Everyone benefits when our kids graduate, but the system can only do so much to make it happen. The reality is, they are given chance, after chance, after chance to make it happen.

They had the same teachers that the valedictorian and the honor graduates had. Now, is it the teachers fault?
Beach bum

Cartersville, GA

#28 May 25, 2013
Go Figure wrote:
If in fact it's the teachers, why is no one arguing that maybe the teacher was to rigorous and the student failed? Wouldn't it be easier to to simply pass the student to raise the graduation rate? Graduation tests are a thing of the past so really all the student has to do is pass the class. Seriously, a kid can't make a 70? Which in fact would probably be more like a 60 due to the catering and extra chances that kids get.
Also, there is a direct correlation between attendance and graduation rate. Is missing 30+ days a year the teachers fault? You look at the ones that don't graduate and you will see high absences, lot's of discipline, etc.
In addition, what if a student drops out ( and there are many between the 3 high schools)? Some may not know how the graduation rate is determined, but when you include an entering 9th grader who drops out before the 12 grade it counts agaisnt you. Is that the teachers fault?
We all know there are bad teachers, but pointing the finger only at teachers and not the parents and/or the economics of the child and his/her family is not very accurate.
Everyone benefits when our kids graduate, but the system can only do so much to make it happen. The reality is, they are given chance, after chance, after chance to make it happen.
They had the same teachers that the valedictorian and the honor graduates had. Now, is it the teachers fault?
Very well said.
thanks

Cartersville, GA

#29 May 26, 2013
Go Figure wrote:
If in fact it's the teachers, why is no one arguing that maybe the teacher was to rigorous and the student failed? Wouldn't it be easier to to simply pass the student to raise the graduation rate? Graduation tests are a thing of the past so really all the student has to do is pass the class. Seriously, a kid can't make a 70? Which in fact would probably be more like a 60 due to the catering and extra chances that kids get.
Also, there is a direct correlation between attendance and graduation rate. Is missing 30+ days a year the teachers fault? You look at the ones that don't graduate and you will see high absences, lot's of discipline, etc.
In addition, what if a student drops out ( and there are many between the 3 high schools)? Some may not know how the graduation rate is determined, but when you include an entering 9th grader who drops out before the 12 grade it counts agaisnt you. Is that the teachers fault?
We all know there are bad teachers, but pointing the finger only at teachers and not the parents and/or the economics of the child and his/her family is not very accurate.
Everyone benefits when our kids graduate, but the system can only do so much to make it happen. The reality is, they are given chance, after chance, after chance to make it happen.
They had the same teachers that the valedictorian and the honor graduates had. Now, is it the teachers fault?
Good point, teacher.
Please

Cartersville, GA

#30 May 27, 2013
Go Figure wrote:
If in fact it's the teachers, why is no one arguing that maybe the teacher was to rigorous and the student failed? Wouldn't it be easier to to simply pass the student to raise the graduation rate? Graduation tests are a thing of the past so really all the student has to do is pass the class. Seriously, a kid can't make a 70? Which in fact would probably be more like a 60 due to the catering and extra chances that kids get.
Also, there is a direct correlation between attendance and graduation rate. Is missing 30+ days a year the teachers fault? You look at the ones that don't graduate and you will see high absences, lot's of discipline, etc.
In addition, what if a student drops out ( and there are many between the 3 high schools)? Some may not know how the graduation rate is determined, but when you include an entering 9th grader who drops out before the 12 grade it counts agaisnt you. Is that the teachers fault?
We all know there are bad teachers, but pointing the finger only at teachers and not the parents and/or the economics of the child and his/her family is not very accurate.
Everyone benefits when our kids graduate, but the system can only do so much to make it happen. The reality is, they are given chance, after chance, after chance to make it happen.
They had the same teachers that the valedictorian and the honor graduates had. Now, is it the teachers fault?
Everyone knows that they give the honors students the better teachers. So...no, they didn't have the same quality of teachers. And before you start arguing about this, it is like this in every school district across America.
Go Figure

Cartersville, GA

#31 May 27, 2013
Please wrote:
<quoted text>
Everyone knows that they give the honors students the better teachers. So...no, they didn't have the same quality of teachers. And before you start arguing about this, it is like this in every school district across America.
Actually you are incorrect. Many of the Advanced Placement and Honors teachers will also teach courses that are considered traditional or even remedial. Even still, what about the students that DID graduate and aren't considered "honor" students? The point is this... If you didn't graduate, you still had the same opportunity as the other students in the building who did graduate.
Brewsternews

Cartersville, GA

#32 May 27, 2013
Go Figure wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually you are incorrect. Many of the Advanced Placement and Honors teachers will also teach courses that are considered traditional or even remedial. Even still, what about the students that DID graduate and aren't considered "honor" students? The point is this... If you didn't graduate, you still had the same opportunity as the other students in the building who did graduate.
Perhaps this is a cultural problem. The legislature has barely hidden its contempt for public education. Passing bills such as the private scholarship tax credit while refusing to properly fund QBE doesn't seem to send a message to the citizens of Georgia of support for education in general.
Go Figure

Cartersville, GA

#33 May 27, 2013
Brewsternews wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps this is a cultural problem. The legislature has barely hidden its contempt for public education. Passing bills such as the private scholarship tax credit while refusing to properly fund QBE doesn't seem to send a message to the citizens of Georgia of support for education in general.
You are right about that!! Throwing money at the schools doesn't equate to higher graduation rates, but the legislature has certainly made it clear what their preference is. I'm not going to argue right or wrong on some of the policy decisions, but many of them hinder the system instead of its intention to try and help.
neighbor

Rome, GA

#34 May 27, 2013
Buzzword wrote:
Here is a novel idea: Perhaps there is room for improvement at all points. Parents, work with your kids. Teachers, hunker down and do your job, and stay off your cell phone. Principals, enforce consequences for teachers and students. School Board, clean house!
Well said.

Since: Nov 12

Location hidden

#35 May 27, 2013
Brewsternews wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps this is a cultural problem. The legislature has barely hidden its contempt for public education. Passing bills such as the private scholarship tax credit while refusing to properly fund QBE doesn't seem to send a message to the citizens of Georgia of support for education in general.
I would say that the private scholarship tax credit actually illustrates support for education by offering alternatives to parents who, for whatever reason, feel their child would perform better in a private school setting. The fund is capped so as not to adversely impact the public school budget and is less than 1% of the total allocated for the public school system. Parents need the power to determine which educational environment works best for their child - be it the traditional public school, private school, charter school or home school.
Mrprez

Lindale, GA

#36 May 28, 2013
One word. VOUCHERS
Just my Opinion

Conley, GA

#37 May 28, 2013
True Story.... let's compare two students in my family. Both struggled in school. One went early and stayed late daily to receive help with the subject. Did their classwork and homework to the best of their ability. Graduated on time. Other student did not seek assistance, "laid out" many days, did not care, expected the school to just "let him" graduate. This student did not graduate. Both had various teachers, ranging from GREAT to AWFUL, but attitude and effort were the key. You can not MAKE people care!!
Proven

Cartersville, GA

#38 May 28, 2013
It is a fact that one bad elementary teacher can put a child behind, and two in a row can sink them for good. While I firmly believe that children and parents are the most important factors in whether a child succeeds in learning, to take the teachers out of the equation and not hold them at least partially responsible is ridiculous.

Besides, have you ever tried to get a child moved from a bad teacher's class? It takes an act of Congress most of the time. And the bad teachers (and administrators) are almost always moved around from class to class or school to school. Or even worse, the bad teachers are simply placed with the kids they can screw up the least. School choice and no tenure...then when parents refuse to keep children in the class of the bad teacher, the loss of money to the school will speak loud enough to require the bad teacher to be fired. It works for a lot of private schools...teachers can stay so long as the people paying the bills feel like they are getting their money's worth.

P.S. And any teacher who stops teaching the last month of school simply because the CRCT is over would be first on my list of people who needed to go.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#39 May 28, 2013
Aggie23 wrote:
<quoted text>
I would say that the private scholarship tax credit actually illustrates support for education by offering alternatives to parents who, for whatever reason, feel their child would perform better in a private school setting. The fund is capped so as not to adversely impact the public school budget and is less than 1% of the total allocated for the public school system. Parents need the power to determine which educational environment works best for their child - be it the traditional public school, private school, charter school or home school.
However, enrollment in private schools has decreased by 1% and increased in public schools by 1% consistently since 2008. Not a huge change but a steady change nonetheless. Does it make sense to divert tax dollars away from struggling public schools to fund Christian, Jewish and Muslim schools in greater Atlanta? And to increase this amount to $58 Million dollars even while private school enrollment continually decreases?

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#40 May 28, 2013
Proven wrote:
It is a fact that one bad elementary teacher can put a child behind, and two in a row can sink them for good. While I firmly believe that children and parents are the most important factors in whether a child succeeds in learning, to take the teachers out of the equation and not hold them at least partially responsible is ridiculous.
Besides, have you ever tried to get a child moved from a bad teacher's class? It takes an act of Congress most of the time. And the bad teachers (and administrators) are almost always moved around from class to class or school to school. Or even worse, the bad teachers are simply placed with the kids they can screw up the least. School choice and no tenure...then when parents refuse to keep children in the class of the bad teacher, the loss of money to the school will speak loud enough to require the bad teacher to be fired. It works for a lot of private schools...teachers can stay so long as the people paying the bills feel like they are getting their money's worth.
P.S. And any teacher who stops teaching the last month of school simply because the CRCT is over would be first on my list of people who needed to go.
Very Good points. However, students can move schools within a district if there is enough room at the desired school. The district administration will take notice of this. Plus, if you want to make changes to you LOCAL school system you can. GA public schools are controlled by state and local government. Taking tax money that the student's family more than likely did not generate will further cripple an underfunded school district.

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