Parents of special-needs students say...

Parents of special-needs students say Bloom-Carroll shorting kids; administrators disagree

There are 139 comments on the DispatchPolitics story from Jan 23, 2011, titled Parents of special-needs students say Bloom-Carroll shorting kids; administrators disagree. In it, DispatchPolitics reports that:

Eighth-grader Benjamin Barlow, who has Down syndrome, is sometimes excluded at Bloom-Carroll Middle School, his parents say.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at DispatchPolitics.

First Prev
of 7
Next Last
erica

Dublin, OH

#1 Jan 23, 2011
Well, isn't that special.
Neo Con Tea Party

Reynoldsburg, OH

#2 Jan 23, 2011
What happens to personal responsibility? I thought Fox news taught us we need to get rid of government so individuals can take care of themselves!!! We have become nanny state we need to let the parents take care of their own retarded kids not using taxpayers money... blah blah blah
WHS76

Reynoldsburg, OH

#3 Jan 23, 2011
Its a shame everybody has to pay for a few.
WHS76

Reynoldsburg, OH

#4 Jan 23, 2011
Neo Con Tea Party wrote:
What happens to personal responsibility? I thought Fox news taught us we need to get rid of government so individuals can take care of themselves!!! We have become nanny state we need to let the parents take care of their own retarded kids not using taxpayers money... blah blah blah
I must agree
It will pass

Portsmouth, OH

#5 Jan 23, 2011
I'm SO sick of whining parents! Teachers don't do this, schools don't do that, blah, blah, blah! Everybody wants somebody else to do something for them. If you don't like it, MOVE or transfer schools. This is probably some stay at home mom that doesn't have anything else to do but write letters to a school. When all else fails, blame it on a teacher! SICKENING!
Wow

Columbus, OH

#7 Jan 23, 2011
I thought my comments might not be PC, but some are just nor thoughtful at all. Without name calling, this is what is wrong with education. This is what has driven up the costs. It is not the teachers' unions. I repeat. It is not the teachers' unions.

The costs go up because these programs require more teachers, administrators (w/ an "s" at the end), and also legal defense for the district. The teachers' union will defend the teacher who will be blamed as the scapegoat for the district. That is why the teacher belongs and in a case like this will find it necessary. Anyone who is employed would be happy to be a part of an association that will stand up for them when they are being accused of not doing their job properly while they were just following orders.

The district will pay a ridiculous amount of money to defend themselves in this case. The district will pay a ridiculous amount of money to educate this roughly 10% of the poulation which will require special transportation, aides, teachers, resources, etc. The district will be on the hook for this until the student is 21 years old!

Is it fair? Call your congressman. They are the only ones who could possibly change this requirement as it is a federal law. Don't think for 1 second that this is an isolated case. I'll guarantee it is happening in your neighborhood school too. The dispatch could be filled daily with articles like this from all over the State and the Nation.

Why are spending so much for such a small percent of the population? By law, we must! Meanwhile, we cut funding and programs for Talented & Gifted because it is such a small population. It is no wonder why our education system is so weak.

I feel sorry for the family and the school district. I'm certain that both are doing all they can with their knowledge and resources.
henley

Dublin, OH

#8 Jan 23, 2011
My friend is an R.N. and she is paid to tend to one, ONE, child in a Pennsylvania government school because that child has allergies. She accompanies that child all during the school day to make sure he is safe from allergens. Think what this costs taxpayers.
Cartman

Powell, OH

#9 Jan 23, 2011
Every child deserves the best education possible both at school and at home. Several years ago the MRDD programs convinced parents that their students needed to be in regular schools instead of in the schools that were designed and developed for them by the "experts in the field." What resulted was the regular public school system being inundated with an entirely new population of special needs students while the MRDD programs kept all the funding for the rather meager population who were left in their care.

What resulted is what we see today. Along with all the other unfunded mandates emanating from the state and federal government the special needs students require a quite disproportionate amount of time and resources in relation to their population. As stated before I feel they are entitled to the best education possible- but so is every child. The most disadvantaged group in today's public school is the average child who doesn't fit any definition at the top or bottom of the learning spectrum.

The new governor would have been much better served to have given his speech delivered to the EPA to assure business is given free reign instead to the Department of Education to try to bring back some sanity to how all of our children are educated. As it stands today the public school system is under attack from all sides to the point teachers are treated as the enemies of learning while all the true impediments of effective teaching are being ignored.
Bob

Kennesaw, GA

#10 Jan 23, 2011
henley wrote:
My friend is an R.N. and she is paid to tend to one, ONE, child in a Pennsylvania government school because that child has allergies. She accompanies that child all during the school day to make sure he is safe from allergens. Think what this costs taxpayers.
What does it matter if it costs so much, liberal judges have ruled over time that special needs children get what they want, it's a right. Ask the parents how much taxmoney should be spent on their child and I bet they would feel any amount is justified.
Tank

Clyde, OH

#11 Jan 23, 2011
I agree the government has made these requirements. If you have a special needs child you would appreciate the concerns. Please remember that the people in the state that oversee education did also work at the same level as the people they are overseeing. Imagine that. The whole system is flawed. The selective review is exactly what the school district would rather have. This way selective teachers are interviewed and a survey sent to parents. Iam sure the needs of most special needs children are being met. However, when 1 is not, the system uses the others to show compliance. Ask that your childs regular class room teachers be interviewed, not just the special needs teachers. I am sure the schools first response was that the IEP is being met. Actually confirm that the services are being given through interviews with the classroom teachers, not just recorded on paper that they are. Good luck
Get Real

Kansas City, MO

#12 Jan 23, 2011
You have a right to an education, but not at the expense of the other students which is what happens when all the extra dollars are spent on these kids. Should all kids suffer because of a few that will really never be a productive person. Granted, a few will be productive but, this is mainly for the parents to feel their child is normal. They aren't, accept it!
Not Sold

AOL

#13 Jan 23, 2011
Cartman wrote:
Every child deserves the best education possible both at school and at home. Several years ago the MRDD programs convinced parents that their students needed to be in regular schools instead of in the schools that were designed and developed for them by the "experts in the field." What resulted was the regular public school system being inundated with an entirely new population of special needs students while the MRDD programs kept all the funding for the rather meager population who were left in their care.
What resulted is what we see today. Along with all the other unfunded mandates emanating from the state and federal government the special needs students require a quite disproportionate amount of time and resources in relation to their population. As stated before I feel they are entitled to the best education possible- but so is every child. The most disadvantaged group in today's public school is the average child who doesn't fit any definition at the top or bottom of the learning spectrum.
The new governor would have been much better served to have given his speech delivered to the EPA to assure business is given free reign instead to the Department of Education to try to bring back some sanity to how all of our children are educated. As it stands today the public school system is under attack from all sides to the point teachers are treated as the enemies of learning while all the true impediments of effective teaching are being ignored.
At one time, teachers had to have a degree in special education to work with special needs children. Now that these children are in the regular classroom, teachers are expected to just know how to deal with all types of special needs without any real training. Really not fair to educators who are being pulled in so many directions.
aja411

Hilliard, OH

#14 Jan 23, 2011
OMG what a bunch of cruel people. You would surely feel different if you had a special needs child. It takes a caring person to do that. Which you people are not just by the comments posted here. I do not have a special needs child but I have compasion. How would you like it if your child was being called retarded ? Neo Con Tea Party nice name calling. If this is the way you want government to run. I think I'll stick with the corrupt one we have.
It will pass

Portsmouth, OH

#15 Jan 23, 2011
Not Sold wrote:
<quoted text> At one time, teachers had to have a degree in special education to work with special needs children. Now that these children are in the regular classroom, teachers are expected to just know how to deal with all types of special needs without any real training. Really not fair to educators who are being pulled in so many directions.
EXACTLY, but we'll blame it on the teachers anyway!
abe

Cincinnati, OH

#16 Jan 23, 2011
Wow. Not one sympathetic comment towards these children - the most important part of the story.

Incredible.

Erica & Neo Con Tea Party, God forbid you ever birth a special needs child (or a "normal" child for that matter)- they don't deserve a parent like you.
Ralph Mouth

Napa, CA

#17 Jan 23, 2011
This is a difficult issue. How much support/money does one educatiion student need? How much support/money does a regular education student need? Do you mainstream a special education student? Do you leavie them in a special classroom all day? Small schools who have less resources are in a crunch. Good luck to everyone involved.
2 Be Frank

Hilliard, OH

#18 Jan 23, 2011
As parent of a child with disabilities, and gifted children, while residing in the Bloom-Carroll district; I am qualified to comment on this story. Forest Rose School exists for a reason. It is the best school in our community for the disabled. Professionals are employed there that can make the most out of each childÂ’s potential. It may not be the most convenient school for your children to attend, and if you are insecure with your own perceived stigma of having a student there, well you had better just get over-it, and think about what is really best.

The taxpayers of Fairfield County fund Forest Rose School to provide the best opportunities for the children in attendance. The educators there are caring, giving, insightful, competent, and specially trained to provide the best education possible in the best environment possible. On the other hand, BC high is just that a high school, a place where children are expected to learn at a rate that is compatible with societal needs in preparation for preparing young adults to enter the real world of work, higher education or military service.
gladysrosamond

Columbus, OH

#20 Jan 23, 2011
Why do these parents insist on trying to mainstream there kids into regular classes. Bus them to special ed schools where they belong and teach them to their ability there. Quit having to have individual aides for each one, paid for by taxpayers and all the other added expense and extra effort required to try to teach them in a regular classroom. Sorry, butd espite your high hopes and dreams, these kids are going to be special needs all their lives - accept it and quit trying to blame teachers and administrators for not including them in regular classes, when they're not ready and can't perform in regular classes. And, just for the record, I hate Bloom-Carroll schools.
Topper

Columbus, OH

#21 Jan 23, 2011
How about the Columbus Fireman, moving into Columbus, and sending his kid to Columbus Schools......
Most firemen move as far away as they can...They only have to drive into Columbus twice a week....
abe

Cincinnati, OH

#22 Jan 23, 2011
gladys, these children have been handicapped by genetics AND by your ignorance.

You don't know what the potential for their future is, so don't handicap them further with your own ill-informed limitations and boundaries.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 7
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Carroll Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
joel downhour (Feb '14) 16 hr Blah 3
Zach Bickenheuser Thu scorned momma 1
News Chevrolet Malibu Owners: Problems & Solutions (Jun '06) Sep 27 Jay 2,885
Slumlord Sep 27 Wrong Hole 3
jorden hovatter Sep 27 Bill 11
Spicy Situation Sep 19 They cannot kill ... 3
Gina Bentle (Dec '15) Sep 17 Old cop 19

Carroll Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Carroll Mortgages