Bloom-Carroll told to plan fix for sp...

Bloom-Carroll told to plan fix for special ed | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 30 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Apr 28, 2011, titled Bloom-Carroll told to plan fix for special ed | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

The Ohio Department of Education told the Bloom-Carroll school district in Fairfield County this week to submit a plan to correct deficiencies in its special-education program.

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asking out loud

Blacklick, OH

#1 Apr 28, 2011
10% of the B-C student population are special ed? Does anyone else find that number high?
Whats Wrong with Ed

Columbus, OH

#2 Apr 28, 2011
10% is actually low compared to many districts. I work at a school that is closer to 50%. This is what has the cost of education rising at rates that are unsustainable. 800 laws to follow! These laws come w/ costs associated with them and require legal advisors and other (non?)essential staffing needs. It is ridiculous. If you factor in these requirements with healthcare's rising costs, you've got broke districts seeking levies.
notaliberal

Dublin, OH

#4 Apr 28, 2011
asking out loud wrote:
10% of the B-C student population are special ed? Does anyone else find that number high?
Yes, 10% does sound high. And it is high. And I guess the schools get extra money for "special" students so it would behoove them to get that percentage up there as high as they can get it. B-C schools are run by idjits and have been for years. Corrupt ones at that. But the locals are as oblivious as any other bunch so they don't know the difference. Unless you would have been there you can't imagine that rogues' gallery of board and admin.
Anonymous

Hilliard, OH

#5 Apr 28, 2011
You can rest assured that the violations in the report did not deal with any of the more vague laws. They dealt with the very basics when writing and implementing IEP's. And instead of the District humbly accepting responsibility for their actions and/or mistakes and promising to work hard to provide for these students by making changes they downplay it and even blame it on their teachers?? The teacher's may need more professional development but the problems begin and end with the leadership in that school; from the BOE down. You can't change what you won't admit!
James101

Pickerington, OH

#6 Apr 28, 2011
These folks flipped the bird to the county services who used to provide the special needs teachers to BC. Yet the reason they gave the county for backing out of their service agency is because they said BC could do a better job in-house....Gee..I think that plan fell thru. And the students were left behind!
one who knows

Columbus, OH

#7 Apr 28, 2011
Take it from me, Roger Mace needs to go. He's in it for the money and not the welfare of the students.
I know too

Columbus, OH

#8 Apr 28, 2011
I think some of the parents had unrealistic expectations. The parents of the children with cystic fibrosis should absolutely hold the school to providing accomodations to their children. However, the parent of the Down's child should have put him in a school designed to deal with mental disabilities. I was dumbfounded as to why the parent insisted on having that child in regular classes. Detrimental to learning processes of both her child and other children in the class.
Fed up

Bucyrus, OH

#9 Apr 28, 2011
It's about time BC is forced to follow guidelines! And Roger Mace blaming the teachers is absurd! They work hard and do what they can to provide the most appropriate education that the administration will allow them to. Maybe instead of blaming the teachers, he should take a long hard look in the mirror. He may want to take a look at his special Ed director and some principals as well!

And as for the comment on the child with downs, you have got to be kidding me! He is more than capable of being in gen ed classes! As well as the several kids that they ship to Amanda with ADHD and Autism!
topdog

Pickerington, OH

#10 Apr 28, 2011
If what you say is true Fed up, then does he take the State Test?
osubucks

Pickerington, OH

#11 Apr 28, 2011
I highly doubt anyone that works at BC is in it for the money. They don't make enough to be in it for the money.
I know too

Columbus, OH

#12 Apr 28, 2011
Fed up wrote:
And as for the comment on the child with downs, you have got to be kidding me! He is more than capable of being in gen ed classes! As well as the several kids that they ship to Amanda with ADHD and Autism!
No, he's not. I have all the care in world for children with disabilities, but one must also be realistic about their limitations. I don't think "normal" children should be held back by someone with a very real delay. Further, I would think (just my opinion) that he would be negatively affected by that emotionally as it would further highlight his disability.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#13 Apr 28, 2011
asking out loud wrote:
10% of the B-C student population are special ed? Does anyone else find that number high?
Actually, it is low, compared to state and national averages. BTW, students are not "special ed." They may HAVE special needs or disabilities.
workingdadof7

Philo, OH

#14 Apr 28, 2011
Now it's time to wait for the lawsuit. How much will be their pain and suffering?
Reader

Columbus, OH

#15 Apr 28, 2011
Whats Wrong with Ed wrote:
10% is actually low compared to many districts. I work at a school that is closer to 50%. This is what has the cost of education rising at rates that are unsustainable. 800 laws to follow! These laws come w/ costs associated with them and require legal advisors and other (non?)essential staffing needs. It is ridiculous. If you factor in these requirements with healthcare's rising costs, you've got broke districts seeking levies.
That is very high. I am curious as to how you account for it? What particular categories appear to be high? Many people believe that there are links to genetics and poverty--however, when examined, one generally finds that the rate of students having developmental disabilities (which actually does have a potential genetic link) is pretty constant, but the percentages of students in the more subjectively diagnosed categories of emotional disturbance or learning disability are inflated.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#16 Apr 28, 2011
I know too wrote:
<quoted text>
No, he's not. I have all the care in world for children with disabilities, but one must also be realistic about their limitations. I don't think "normal" children should be held back by someone with a very real delay. Further, I would think (just my opinion) that he would be negatively affected by that emotionally as it would further highlight his disability.
And yet, most research on the subject disputes what you believe. Inclusive settings don't harm the students without disabilities and the are helpful to those with disabilities.

Of course--there are always ways to short-circuit a good situation.
one who knows

Columbus, OH

#17 Apr 28, 2011
BC needs to clean house, starting from the top down...too much nepotism and familiarity
osubucks

Pickerington, OH

#18 Apr 28, 2011
I am pretty sure they have some of the highest scores in central Ohio. I know they kick my schools arse. Must be doing something right.
James101

Pickerington, OH

#19 Apr 28, 2011
From what I hear he has definitely taken a "long look" for many years at his spec needs supervisor. Looks that have occured for many years prior to her even coming to BC. But I heard she is resigning.
Fed up wrote:
It's about time BC is forced to follow guidelines! And Roger Mace blaming the teachers is absurd! They work hard and do what they can to provide the most appropriate education that the administration will allow them to. Maybe instead of blaming the teachers, he should take a long hard look in the mirror. He may want to take a look at his special Ed director and some principals as well!
And as for the comment on the child with downs, you have got to be kidding me! He is more than capable of being in gen ed classes! As well as the several kids that they ship to Amanda with ADHD and Autism!
Arwen

United States

#20 Apr 28, 2011
I know too wrote:
I think some of the parents had unrealistic expectations. The parents of the children with cystic fibrosis should absolutely hold the school to providing accomodations to their children. However, the parent of the Down's child should have put him in a school designed to deal with mental disabilities. I was dumbfounded as to why the parent insisted on having that child in regular classes. Detrimental to learning processes of both her child and other children in the class.
It sounds like you think you have first hand experience with these disabilities. How do you know so much?
Arwen

United States

#21 Apr 28, 2011
I know too wrote:
<quoted text>
No, he's not. I have all the care in world for children with disabilities, but one must also be realistic about their limitations. I don't think "normal" children should be held back by someone with a very real delay. Further, I would think (just my opinion) that he would be negatively affected by that emotionally as it would further highlight his disability.
How do YOU know he's not?

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