Are Indiana's Marijuana Laws too Harsh?

Posted in the Carmel Forum

First Prev
of 114
Next Last
Derrick

Kokomo, IN

#1 Oct 19, 2007
I believe that current marijuana laws in Indiana are far to harsh. A first time possession charge can put an otherwise responsible tax-paying citizen in jail for a year and/or a $5000 fine. Not only that, it creates a criminal record for the individual making it almost impossible to find decent job.

In 2002, over 14,000 individuals were arrested in Indiana for marijuana. That's an amazing 5.5% of all arrest. That boils down to over 14,000 individuals unable to find a job because of their new criminal records which means that that person is no longer able to pay taxes that we all must pay so the police can continue to make these thousands of pointless arrest. And not all these arrest were just kids, about 70% of these arrest are individuals 20 years old or older.

Marijuana has been proven to be much more safe than tobacco or drinking. Thousands and thousands of people die every year from tobacco or drinking; none one has ever died from smoking marijuana.

Ask yourself what's the worse that could happen if Indiana put a lower priority and eliminated the crimal court system from marijuana. Some states have adobted a system that eliminates the responsible, adult pot smoker from the criminal system by issuing the individual with a ticket, like a speeding ticket, that the individual just needs to pay a fine ($100 in Ohio) and recieves no criminal records. Indiana would spend less of our tax money on pointless arrest leaving more money for real criminals such as gangs, murders, and rapist and not to mention all the extra tax money our state would recieve from all the responsible, adult marijuana users that are able to continue working their good jobs.

Just think about it. Is marijuana illegal because it's bad or is marijuana bad because it's illegal?

Since: Aug 07

Hammond, IN

#2 Oct 19, 2007
If the tobacco and drug companies could product it and tax it, it would be legal.
Jesus

Pryor, OK

#3 Oct 19, 2007
I rebuke you satan...
Johnny

Indianapolis, IN

#4 Oct 19, 2007
Spiritwindman wrote:
If the tobacco and drug companies could product it and tax it, it would be legal.
They can, a my good friend's uncle was a VP for a MAJOR tobacco corp. in KY several years ago, they have everything ready to go, down to the packaging and rolling systems involved. They could do it in a heartbeat. They would regulate it much like alchohol. It would be expensive but most of the money would go towards taxes because it is easy to produce. The problem is that it is so easy to produce that many people would make their own.(Bathtub Gin ring a bell?) They the government would be in the place that it started, no tax dollars from it.

“English, please?”

Since: May 07

London (not that one)

#5 Oct 19, 2007
Tokers all seem to think so.

As if the penalties weren't extremely easy to avoid....

But speeders hate speed limits, drunks hate public intoxication laws, theives hate theft laws....
Derrick

Kokomo, IN

#6 Oct 19, 2007
AnnaLynn wrote:
Tokers all seem to think so.
As if the penalties weren't extremely easy to avoid....
But speeders hate speed limits, drunks hate public intoxication laws, theives hate theft laws....
But there is one major difference between things such as speeding, public intox, and theft and a responsible, adult pot-smoker... the punishiment for the 'crime' does more damage than the crime itself when arresting a responsible pot-smoker. When you arrest a responsible pot-smoker, you're taking an other wise law-biding, tax-pay citizen and spending tax dollars on arresting, prosecuting, and jailing that individual that was not harming one single person. When you arrest a speeder (who would have to be speeding by A LOT to get arrested) you're taking someone off that street that can possibly cause harm to another person. Drunks have been proven to be more prone to violence than a person who is not intoxicated, so hence the public intox laws. And obviously a theft is going to cause harm to at least one other individual if he or she got caught and arrested.

“English, please?”

Since: May 07

London (not that one)

#7 Oct 19, 2007
lol..."responsible pot-smoker"...that never gets old...

Responsbible speeder, responsible con-artist...

Knowing the penalties for smoking pot and doing it anyway (and in such a manner as to get caught) is not what a "wise" person would do.

It's easy to avoid the penalties for smoking pot. Just don't.
The Joker

Greenwood, IN

#8 Oct 19, 2007
Derrick wrote:
I believe that current marijuana laws in Indiana are far to harsh. A first time possession charge can put an otherwise responsible tax-paying citizen in jail for a year and/or a $5000 fine. Not only that, it creates a criminal record for the individual making it almost impossible to find decent job.
In 2002, over 14,000 individuals were arrested in Indiana for marijuana. That's an amazing 5.5% of all arrest. That boils down to over 14,000 individuals unable to find a job because of their new criminal records which means that that person is no longer able to pay taxes that we all must pay so the police can continue to make these thousands of pointless arrest. And not all these arrest were just kids, about 70% of these arrest are individuals 20 years old or older.
Marijuana has been proven to be much more safe than tobacco or drinking. Thousands and thousands of people die every year from tobacco or drinking; none one has ever died from smoking marijuana.
Ask yourself what's the worse that could happen if Indiana put a lower priority and eliminated the crimal court system from marijuana. Some states have adobted a system that eliminates the responsible, adult pot smoker from the criminal system by issuing the individual with a ticket, like a speeding ticket, that the individual just needs to pay a fine ($100 in Ohio) and recieves no criminal records. Indiana would spend less of our tax money on pointless arrest leaving more money for real criminals such as gangs, murders, and rapist and not to mention all the extra tax money our state would recieve from all the responsible, adult marijuana users that are able to continue working their good jobs.
Just think about it. Is marijuana illegal because it's bad or is marijuana bad because it's illegal?
This is clearly a response from a pro-weed individual. But let's set some facts straight first. Unless you're carrying over 30 grams or dealing, almost all charges involving marijuana are misdemeanors and Indiana will let you bond out of jail with usually 1 year probation, the same as a DUI. Every weeder I've ever had contact with had good jobs so your argument is weak at best. Your contention that no one has ever died from smoking marijuana is also suspect as 35% of people brought to emergency rooms have detectable levels of pot in their blood. Now while that doesn't mean they were high when they got hurt or died, it is a factor that can't be overlooked. You are correct when you say that money on arrests could be better spent: research indicates that if marijuana were legal, each state in the Union could see a 200 million dollar savings in law enforcement. But is marijuana "more safe" than cigarettes? If you consider that the "resin" from pot is actually tar, ask yourself when the last time you saw that dripping off a cigarette. ANd since most people smoke weed unfiltered, research has also shown that the amount of tar and carcinogens are equal to 4 cigarettes. Is marijuana worse than alcohol? Not if it's used responsibly but then again, neither is alcohol. While there are pluses and minuses to this issue, get your "facts" straight before you go out waving this banner again, boy.
Derrick

Kokomo, IN

#9 Oct 19, 2007
The Joker wrote:
<quoted text>This is clearly a response from a pro-weed individual. But let's set some facts straight first. Unless you're carrying over 30 grams or dealing, almost all charges involving marijuana are misdemeanors and Indiana will let you bond out of jail with usually 1 year probation, the same as a DUI. Every weeder I've ever had contact with had good jobs so your argument is weak at best. Your contention that no one has ever died from smoking marijuana is also suspect as 35% of people brought to emergency rooms have detectable levels of pot in their blood. Now while that doesn't mean they were high when they got hurt or died, it is a factor that can't be overlooked. You are correct when you say that money on arrests could be better spent: research indicates that if marijuana were legal, each state in the Union could see a 200 million dollar savings in law enforcement. But is marijuana "more safe" than cigarettes? If you consider that the "resin" from pot is actually tar, ask yourself when the last time you saw that dripping off a cigarette. ANd since most people smoke weed unfiltered, research has also shown that the amount of tar and carcinogens are equal to 4 cigarettes. Is marijuana worse than alcohol? Not if it's used responsibly but then again, neither is alcohol. While there are pluses and minuses to this issue, get your "facts" straight before you go out waving this banner again, boy.
Is probation better than jail? Yea maybe but regardless, the criminal record punishment enough. And every weeder you know has a good job? I find that hard to believe unless a) they've been lucky enough not to ever get caught or b) you're considering McDonalds, factory, or labor jobs 'good jobs'. Two individuals apply for the same manager or executive position at a corporation, one individual is more experienced but has a 'criminal record' because he/she got busted with some pot back in college, the other person is going to get the job regardless if they are better for the position. And 35% of all people admitted in the ER has detectable levels of THC, that simply means that 35% of the those people have smoked not that day, not the day before, but possibly just weeks before. It's impossible to say if those ER visits are indirectly, let alone directly related to the consumption of marijuana. And you're exactly right, smoking one marijuana cigarette is equal to smoking about four regular cigarettes BUT a tobacco smoker smokes what? 20, 40, 60 cigarettes a day? A average pot smoker in America doesn't smoke everyday but if they did, would it average out to 5, 10, 15 marijuana cigarettes daily? I don't think so... marijuana may have more tar per cigaretter but smoking is more harmful due to the average amount of consumption. I do believe my facts are straight I seriously doubt that I'm what you would consider to be a 'boy'. Maybe you should ask yourself to openly view the other opinion before carrying on with mis-informed 'facts' if that what you would like to call them.

Anyway, the point of this conversation was discussing if the current Indiana laws are too harsh. I've lived in many different states and studied abroad many years ago and I've noticed that this state seems to be a bit more strict then a lot of places I've been. Didn't mean to create a debate over the 'facts' of marijuana.

Since: Dec 06

Peru, Indiana

#10 Oct 19, 2007
There really is no good reason why it should be illegal. Study after study has supported it's effect as being no worse than alcohol.

It's all about money.
WTF

United States

#11 Oct 20, 2007
May the first person who hasn't ever taken a "hit" cast the first stone.(no pun intended)

Mr. Clinton, yours counts!
WTF

United States

#12 Oct 20, 2007
AnnaLynn wrote:
lol..."responsible pot-smoker"...that never gets old...
Responsbible speeder, responsible con-artist...
Knowing the penalties for smoking pot and doing it anyway (and in such a manner as to get caught) is not what a "wise" person would do.
It's easy to avoid the penalties for smoking pot. Just don't.
Don't forget to lump in "Responsible drinker" -
Hypocrisy abounds
"now, where's my car keys?"
reality check

Peoria, IL

#13 Oct 20, 2007
AnnaLynn wrote:
lol..."responsible pot-smoker"...that never gets old...
Responsbible speeder, responsible con-artist...
Knowing the penalties for smoking pot and doing it anyway (and in such a manner as to get caught) is not what a "wise" person would do.
It's easy to avoid the penalties for smoking pot. Just don't.
I think it's sad that you can't see the underlying problem here. It is a case of people making a decision to alter their own reality without hurting anyone else. This means the government and/or busybodies feel that it is ok to tell the citizens of a "free" country what they can or cannot do in the privacy of their own home. How Orwellian is that? If anyone can name even one profession that doesn't have pot smokers in it I'll eat the stems and seeds out of my next bag. LOL
Seriously, the fear of pot is just ridiculous, and the ability for people to accept that something shouldn't be done just because it is against the law is stupid. Read some laws that are still on the books in various states and see how stupid legislators can be in the search for votes, power and control.
Long live the Big Bamboo!!!

“English, please?”

Since: May 07

London (not that one)

#14 Oct 21, 2007
It's not fear--it's scorn.
Ed Godard

Newport, KY

#15 Oct 21, 2007
I guess I'll have to preface this by saying I haven't even seen pot in some 30 years.

If you own yourself in a free society, you get to decide whether or not to put some substance into your body. If someone smokes pot and harms nobody, why is it a crime? If someone steals to get pot, arrest them. If they injure someone or damage property while under the influence, arrest them. Otherwise? It's just selective nannying. If there were anything like consistency, all mood-altering substances would be banned, including all alcohol. Somehow, we learned that Prohibition does not eliminate the desire to consume alcohol, but failed to transfer our learning to the subject of marijuana.

AnnaLynn, it's freedom that you scorn. Oh, and intelligence.
Pay Attention

Peoria, IL

#18 Oct 22, 2007
I happen to feel nothing but scorn for those who eat tofu. Should we have a war on tofu that will allow us to put people in jail for eating it? What about people who fart in public? I have nothing but scorn for their publicly flatulent ways but I can't imagine handing out a $1000 fine to anyone coming out of Taco Bell after a night of guzzling beer. Anna, my dear, you are a snob.
BRO MAN

United States

#19 Oct 22, 2007
AnnaLynn wrote:
lol..."responsible pot-smoker"...that never gets old...
Responsbible speeder, responsible con-artist...
Knowing the penalties for smoking pot and doing it anyway (and in such a manner as to get caught) is not what a "wise" person would do.
It's easy to avoid the penalties for smoking pot. Just don't.
O, and I bet you are perfect. never drank before 21, perfect credit, etc. You are my idol.

“English, please?”

Since: May 07

London (not that one)

#20 Oct 22, 2007
Actually, I was 31 when I had my first drink. While not perfect, I try to avoid the pits I see others fall into.
Ed Godard

Newport, KY

#21 Oct 23, 2007
I guess I look at this like Voltaire did free speech- I don't advocate smoking pot. I simply defend the right to use it so long as you aren't injuring somebody else.

If you steal for pot- go to jail.
If you injure someone while under the influence- go to jail.
If you smoke and hurt nobody- be left alone.
Just like beer and wine.

As for me, I've never smoked a cigarette in my life. I've seen pot as easily available as cigarettes in my life. According to my son, it is easier to get pot than cigarettes because you get cigs at a store where a young person has to show ID. For pot, you merely need to have a connection with someone willing to break the law.

What the prohibition does is empower people who are willing to break the law. Legalization empowers up front retailers. Beer dealers aren't the scourge of our earth, but somehow drug dealers are. That somehow is the difference between legal and illegal.

Bans do nothing to address the desire for the substance. They do however drive up the price and encourage people to set up turf wars to control the illicit trade.
Kity Floss

Indianapolis, IN

#22 Oct 23, 2007
Derrick wrote:
I believe that current marijuana laws in Indiana are far to harsh. A first time possession charge can put an otherwise responsible tax-paying citizen in jail for a year and/or a $5000 fine. Not only that, it creates a criminal record for the individual making it almost impossible to find decent job.
In 2002, over 14,000 individuals were arrested in Indiana for marijuana. That's an amazing 5.5% of all arrest. That boils down to over 14,000 individuals unable to find a job because of their new criminal records which means that that person is no longer able to pay taxes that we all must pay so the police can continue to make these thousands of pointless arrest. And not all these arrest were just kids, about 70% of these arrest are individuals 20 years old or older.
Marijuana has been proven to be much more safe than tobacco or drinking. Thousands and thousands of people die every year from tobacco or drinking; none one has ever died from smoking marijuana.
Ask yourself what's the worse that could happen if Indiana put a lower priority and eliminated the crimal court system from marijuana. Some states have adobted a system that eliminates the responsible, adult pot smoker from the criminal system by issuing the individual with a ticket, like a speeding ticket, that the individual just needs to pay a fine ($100 in Ohio) and recieves no criminal records. Indiana would spend less of our tax money on pointless arrest leaving more money for real criminals such as gangs, murders, and rapist and not to mention all the extra tax money our state would recieve from all the responsible, adult marijuana users that are able to continue working their good jobs.
Just think about it. Is marijuana illegal because it's bad or is marijuana bad because it's illegal?
Hate to say it,but pot has always been considered 10x harder on your lungs than tobbacco.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 114
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Carmel Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Review: GW TECH PARTS 3 hr bynos mazadza 1
Why do most Blacks hate Whites? (Jul '13) 8 hr Hopeful 473
Does any one know Ira Joe Stouder that passed i... (Dec '09) 11 hr curious 6
krystal hayes ( wills) 11 hr mystery 1
Why do Blacks Hang Out at the Malls? 14 hr Dave 26
To the Sons of Silence MC , Indianapolis Clubhouse (Dec '13) 15 hr The Zombie 94
White Boi's wanna be black syndrome 18 hr Monica 3
Carmel Dating
Find my Match
More from around the web

Carmel People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 10:04 am PST

NFL10:04AM
Richardson was suspended for two Colts playoff games
ESPN10:58 AM
Colts won't commit to RB Richardson for 2015
Yahoo! Sports11:49 AM
League conducts nearly 40 interviews into 'deflate-gate'
Yahoo! Sports11:50 AM
NFL: No decision yet on deflated balls
NBC Sports12:54 PM
Grigson goes silent on NFL investigation into Patriots