Comments
1 - 17 of 17 Comments Last updated May 20, 2014
james marple

San Diego, CA

#1 Jan 10, 2013
4 times as much water as typical Encinitas households use runs off to the ocean because officials have refused to comply with State statures that order them to save "all or any stormwaters" for public use.

Residents would have nearly 200 gallons per person per day available, twice the national average usage, if public officials had adopted a policy of guiding rainwater to storage rather than dumping it to the ocean.

What would it cost to have storm drains and pipes divert all runoff to storage in ponds behind cheap dirt dams in canyons throughout the city, for delivery to the two water districts as needed? Free water to replace the $1,000 per home desalinated water that County officials expect everyone to pay for.

This simple alternative could be fully evaluated at no cost by impartial experts so that elected officials can compare its costs and benefits to ongoing stormwater drainage planning and a "rainwater harvesting" program?
james marple

San Diego, CA

#2 Jan 12, 2013
While I'm not an Encinitas resident good friends who live there are paying more than $200 more per year than necessary and proper just because their politicians have been fooled, coerced or bribed into not instructing public works officials to use commonsense planning and design.
Of course the public works managers should have provided complete and accurate information about this planning option, guiding rainwater to storage instead of to the ocean. But their job security was threatened if they testified fully and fairly so they pretended they were complying with State statutes requiring that all stormwater be guided to storage. Elected officials, educators and journalists did not bother to find and evaluate all planning options so now the price of a year's water supply has escalated to more than $1,000 per home.

But this will be added to bills so gradually that most folks will just grumble.
The really bad news is that because Encinitas officials went along with this scam San Diegans will also get stuck with the bill for that foolish desalinator!
james marple

San Diego, CA

#3 Feb 6, 2013
What would it take to save 3 of the 12 inches of rainwater that fallo on Encinitas yearly? Just a majority of well-informed public officials.

But as long as newly elected Council members continue to be 'educated' by the public servants they are supposed to instruct there's no hope that common sense rainwater managvement will happen.

There are dozens of small canyons available to retain all stormwater runoff but apparently not enough concerned citizens to point this out to their politicians.

The planning required to divert street runoff to these potential reservoirs is not rocket science, a high school science class could produce a workable plan.
But civil engineers who make more work for themselves by not advising their clients, the public, properly are trusted to inform polticians. And that conflict of interest is a perfect recipe for failed planning.
Your so smart

Sun City, CA

#4 Feb 7, 2013
Why you wasting your time on this board? Go do something about it and shut up.
james marple

San Diego, CA

#5 Feb 7, 2013
Providing information about land-water-energy planning options is the first step toward persuading voters to choose politicians smart and honest enough to manage public affairs wisely. My friends in this community expect mindless ridicule such as yours so prefer that I speak for them.

Your words suggest a lack of concern about improving the health-safety-welfare of your friends and neighbors. Could it be that you profit in some way from keeping them ignorant of what they could have if they vote wisely?

Why do you object to simple facts and figures indicating that city officials are collectively incapable of appointing and instructing civil engineers who will redesign rainwater drainage so that one gallon our of four is saved for non-rainy days?
james marple

San Diego, CA

#6 Mar 16, 2013
A state water division worker answering my questions about rainwater being dumped from reservoirs to the ocean mentioned that total water use in California fell from 21.2 trillion gallons in 1990 to 20.6 trillion in 2010.(No total figure was available for the volume of water thrown away just in case a big storm comes to overload the reservoirs.)

600 million gallons will supply only 30,000 people so that's no big drop in usage. Yet during those 20 years tens of billions of dollars were taken from us through local and state government for water system expansions that will "ensure the reliability of water supplies".

Looks like someone is fooling most of us most of the time through our politicians, teachers and news services. Wonder who'd do this, and why?

Now our Arizona neighbors are being conned into approving the same kind of water districts that gave a single agency, MWD, the power to extort billions from us yearly. The land/water/energy profiteers there aim to copy the huge success of California's criminal elite that pays an army of professional liars to mislead us into electing fools and crooks so that they can extort our wealth without fear of punishment.
james marple

San Diego, CA

#7 Apr 14, 2013
-- Why is California's economy collapsing? Here's proof:of it:
~~~~~ STATES RANKED BY RATIO OF DEBT TO PERSONAL INCOME ~~~~~~~
STATE--credit rating--debt % of income--debt per capita -debt/% of CA GDP
Texas...Aaa/AA+/AAA----- 1.5%--------- 588----------1.25%
California...A1/A-/A-------6.0 %---------2,559----------5.07% -

All San Diego residents will soon be suffering much more than now from the coming payments for a huge debt being created by unnecessary seawater desalination. The LA Times told us the Carlsbad desalination project will cost $3.5 billion, that's $4,100 from each water customer of the County.
A Professional Engineer estimated it would cost $220 million to match its 17 billion gallon output by storing part of our rainfall, just $260 per customer.

The true cost of this scam was buried by repetitive news stories saying it would cost less than a billion dollars and most would be paid by the next generation. So voters re-elected the nitwits and crooks who approved it.
(Cunning planners created myths to hide this extortion of $3,500,000,000 from our economy, cash that could buy many schoolbooks, pothole repairs, homeless shelters, police cars pensions.)

A legitimate proposal would have given costs for each alternative, but either County officials withheld this or journalists ignored it. We should have seen estimates of the cost for 17 billion gallons from:
-a) the huge unused aquifer under Lake Henshaw.
-b) the much larger desalination plant in Yuma that sits idle
-c) the hundreds of billions of gallons rivers carry to the ocean yearly
-d) runoff from our roofs-yards-streets
These options could have been presented by any normally capable reporter whose editor wanted them to be seen.

Of course 102,000 homeowners receiving this salt-free desalinated water will be pleased to avoid the $34,000 they should have to pay for it to protect their lush landscapes, horse pastures and golf courses from salty Colorado River water. But these folks have more political power than the million homeowners who will bear 90% of the cost and receive no significant benefit.
james marple

San Diego, CA

#8 May 10, 2013
Opinions invited re the following:
----------
An abbreviated summary of comments by members
of Citizens for Responsible Watershed Management:
~~~~~
- The process of formulating comprehensive watershed management plans for each river basin in San Diego and adjacent counties would provide a clear view of all planning options. This, then, would allow residents to understand land, water, energy and transit matters fully and therefore be able to participate effectively in this planning.

- The three California Resource Conservation Districts of this area were created and empowered for the express purpose of managing land and water in the most equitable and cost-effective manner. RAC committee members could learn about this planning by accessing federal and state experts who would fully inform them and the general public of all costs and benefits.

- Diligent application of the ordinary, low-tech land planning methods recommended by these experts would accomplish proper management of land and water resources at less cost and with more public benefits than ongoing planning. The Best Management Practices of the USDA and the Low Impact Development of the USEPA can be implemented immediately by revising policies of local agencies to bring compliance with the letter and spirit of State statutes.

- CRWM comments posted on the UT online forum and several local TOPIX forums discuss various aspects of land/water/energy management. These are intricately interconnected and must therefore be dealt with as a package of planning options rather than as separate problems. The CRWM model comprehensive watershed management program for the Santa Margarita and other rivers was designed by federal and state experts with this feature a central focus. It may be viewed at the EMA-RCD office in Murrieta or in Riverside County Flood Control & Water Conservation District files.

The problem most frequently cited in CRWM critiques of IRWM-RAC activity was the considerable size and complexity of its "Planning Study Recommendations for San Diego IRWM Program" and "Strategic Plan for the Future of Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM)". County and municipal employees pointed out that this "information overload" causes inattention that precludes thoughtful response. Put another way; Obviously excessive and/or irrelevant detail plus convoluted planning confuses and distracts RAC members so that critical issues get too little attention.

- Members of the RAC committee appear, collectively, deficient in levels of education and specialized training that would permit them to judge the matters in this list wisely by applying lessons of their life experience. Formally trained planners speak this language, the general public that pays their wage does not. Less verbiage would help committee members interact and input more effectively.

- The core element land/water resource planning advocated by USDA-NRCS experts is recognizing that rainwater managed from wherever it falls to its point of use becomes a valuable asset rather than a nuisance, a destructive force or a hazard. This "onsite retention" focus, explicitly prescribed by California Legislators in their original Water Code, is standard practice in major metropolitan areas, with the policies and practices that have been hugely successful in Fresno and Phoenix wholly applicable to our situation.

- The RAC committee cannot in good conscience contiue to ignore its obligation to present complete and accurate information to stakeholders so that they may make wise decisions in coming elections. Only in this way can ongoing planning be steered in the proper direction to produce the most cost-effective and publicly beneficial planning of water resource management.

James Marple for CRWM
james marple

San Diego, CA

#9 May 19, 2013
We posted this on the UT forum a while ago and got an instant call saying it should be posted to Topix. So here you go.
----------
A Professional Engineer still active in Arizona watershed management called to agree with our CRWM ancient expert that 30 years ago SD County had the cheapest, clearnest water supply Ma Nature could provide with a little help from public servants. The Henshaw Reservoir held 68 billion gallons of water, replenished by an average 74 billion gallons of yearly runoff from 110 billion gallons of stormwater and snowmelt. Now it can only hold 18 billion.

With the million households in SD County using only 60 billion gallons this single source of pure water was more than enough to prevent water shortages and damage to the health and welfare of San Diego County citizens by the complex chemical compounds in imported water.

But our deep throat source claims the Upstate water profiteers who control operations of the Metropolitan Water District were able to pressure State officials into declaring the dam unsafe, then persuade County officials to cut through it instead of strengthening it. Re the movie "Chinatown"; a rerun.
And that explains why so much was cut from the version now available.

We are being committed to a debt of $14 billion dollars for dams to hold imported water and a seawater desalination plant, instead of spending less than $1 billion to make the Henshaw dam meet State safety standards so that we can all drink and bathe in our own pure, free rainwater. Go figure.

The Henshaw dam's water was a match to the famous Hetch Hetchy reservoir supplying water to 2.3 million San Francisco citizens for 90 years. Yet we've been denied the use of it by water profiteers collecting windfall profits by selling us water they steal from Upstate residents.

One member suggested that the 58,000 acres around Lake Henshaw owned by the Vista Water District is the real prize, a treasure the land developers who run MWD intend to turn into many billion dollars of profit.

We don't do politics but our concern about wasting water inclines us to be curious about the story behind this latest claim of skulduggery. So we post this, because as long as the public is ignorant of the games it will continue to elect the kind of politician who plays them with the profiteers.
james marple

San Diego, CA

#10 Jul 29, 2013
133 billion gallons of pure rainwater fall on the Vista Water District's 131,840-acre Lake Henshaw watershed yearly, on average. About 45 billion gallons is lost to unavoidable evaporation while the other 88 billion runs off to the lake.

The District provides about 2.5 billion gallons a year to its households and another four billion to industrial and irrigation users. The remainder of this huge precious asset is lost as flow to the ocean and evaporation from the lake area. That loss is preventable, but badly-informed and phony environmentalists have demanded that unnecessarily large flows to the ocean be maintained, while civil engineers have found every reason but a good one to not divert about 60 billion gallons into downstream aquifers for gradual delivery to the public.(This is about as much as all households in San Diego County use yearly.)

With nearly ten times as much pure water as they use going to waste, why are Vista Water District cistomers paying the high cost ($2,100 per million gallons) of importing filthy river water? And why will they be forced to pay off a debt of $3,500 per home for the Carlsbad desalination plant?

The noise of political scandals is too often contrived to drown out the sound of extorting public wealth. Competent, conscientious news services would have asked these questions and provided answers from public servants.
james marple

San Diego, CA

#11 Oct 27, 2013
A retired public servant says North County homeowners will each have to pay $3,500 on the Carlsbad Desalinator's $3.5 billion debt even though its only purpose is to keep fine lawns healthy.

He pointed out that 3 tons of salt is deposited yearly on each acre of luxuriant landscapes, horse pastures and golf courses watered by Colorado River water, progressively poisoning them. So their influential owners leaned on County Water District managers to fix this by building the Desal plant.

That will force ~990,000 homeowners to pay $3,500 more through their water bills to save the grass of ~10,000 happy souls who could afford to filter the salt out but prefer to have all of us pay for their lawns.

Voters who knew this before the last election would have been voted for anyone but an incumbent. So our privately owned news sewrvices withheld this information, the same old politician were elected, and they dutifully approved the $3.5 billion dollar bond.

We are victims of our news media, denied complete information so
that we will meekly pay the extortion demanded by an elite few.
james marple

San Diego, CA

#12 Dec 30, 2013
Restoring a watershed to its 'natural' condition, as a sponge
instead of a sheet of teflon, ends flooding and pollution while
keeping wellwater levels so high that no importation is needed.

A concerned citizen asked how we would manage rainfall on
streets if homesites retained all rainfall using LID planning.
We answered that competent politicians require new streets
to have porous asphalt or concrete pavement that guides all
runoff into the soil. This filters rainwater completely as it is
percolated down to replenish the public's wellwater supply.
Wise Council members would have instructed public servants
to make onsite retention of rainfall with pervious landscapes
and streets standard city design features.

Retrofitting retention of rainfall is cost effective on gently sloping
streets. Slit trenches are cut and perforated plastic pipe dropped
in, to be covered with crushed stone, best done by ordinarily
capable contractors. They need no complex planning and design
by civil engineers, only cooperation to ensure that aquifers are
refilled in the proper sequence by this work.
On steeper street a series of low dirt dams in canyons is best
for retaining runoff to prevent flooding and refill aquifers.

Unfortunately the politicians we've elected were not wise enough
to hire and instruct public works managers properly. As a result
they were consistently deceived by Chief Engineers who focused
on expanding their powers and protecting their job security-fringe
benefits-pensions by doing what land developers wanted instead
of what was best for the public.
james marple

San Diego, CA

#13 Feb 25, 2014
Does the following data tell us why we see only feeble interest from
San Diego males in protecting their family's health and welfare?
How much has a half-century of drinking and bathing-swImming in
imported Colorado River water affected the past two generations?

Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the USA, is directly above where
MWD pumps its water to San Diego. In 2001 it turned green from
algae due to wastewater and synthetic chemicals from residential-
irrigation water runoff and sewage effluent from treatment plants.

The chemicals include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated
biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides (DDT etc) and contaminants such
as fragrances/musks, flame retardants, triclosan and its breakdown
products, personal care products, and pharmaceuticals.

Many of these interact with the endocrine system to cause reproductive
impacts in glands and tissues including the hypothalamus, pituitary,
thyroid, adrenal, thymus, pancreas, ovaries, testes and others. These
release hormones that control development, growth, reproduction and
behavior. In some species hormones also determine whether individuals become male or female during their early development.

Synthetic chemicals known to cause endocrine disruption include
diethylstilbestrol, ethynylestradiol, dioxins, PCBs, perchlorate, heavy
metals and others with estrogenic (feminizing) activity.
EDCs attack embryonic brain tissue and stunt growing brains.

fact sheet:[url]http://www.niehs.ni h.gov/oc/factsheets/pdf/endocr ine.pdf[/url]

The Colorado River water we buy is far more polluted than a North
Carolina river that suffered a coal ash spill that liberal reporters
are hyping in an effort to discredit the new Republican majority.
That river's water is so clean that downstream residents have not
been dumbed down, were smart enough to recognize and throw out
the Democrats who have kept them inpoverished for over a century.
zip

Cicero, IL

#14 Mar 4, 2014
james marple wrote:
Does the following data tell us why we see only feeble interest from
San Diego males in protecting their family's health and welfare?
How much has a half-century of drinking and bathing-swImming in
imported Colorado River water affected the past two generations?

Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the USA, is directly above where
MWD pumps its water to San Diego. In 2001 it turned green from
algae due to wastewater and synthetic chemicals from residential-
irrigation water runoff and sewage effluent from treatment plants.

The chemicals include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated
biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides (DDT etc) and contaminants such
as fragrances/musks, flame retardants, triclosan and its breakdown
products, personal care products, and pharmaceuticals.

Many of these interact with the endocrine system to cause reproductive
impacts in glands and tissues including the hypothalamus, pituitary,
thyroid, adrenal, thymus, pancreas, ovaries, testes and others. These
release hormones that control development, growth, reproduction and
behavior. In some species hormones also determine whether individuals become male or female during their early development.

Synthetic chemicals known to cause endocrine disruption include
diethylstilbestrol, ethynylestradiol, dioxins, PCBs, perchlorate, heavy
metals and others with estrogenic (feminizing) activity.
EDCs attack embryonic brain tissue and stunt growing brains.

fact sheet:[url]http://www.niehs.ni h.gov/oc/factsheets/pdf/endocr ine.pdf[/url]

The Colorado River water we buy is far more polluted than a North
Carolina river that suffered a coal ash spill that liberal reporters
are hyping in an effort to discredit the new Republican majority.
That river's water is so clean that downstream residents have not
been dumbed down, were smart enough to recognize and throw out
the Democrats who have kept them inpoverished for over a century.
its all Tge same.
clue

Chicago, IL

#15 Mar 10, 2014
Work the system
james marple

San Diego, CA

#16 May 12, 2014
"zip" and "clue":

We voters ARE the system.
Each of us must ask ourselves whether it is smaart for the people
we elect to let self-corrupted agency managers feed them and us
fa;se and false and misleading information so that they make stupid
decisions about how to manage our land-water-energy-transit.

If we think our officials should apply common sense to planning the
management of our bountiful rainfall (we receive 1.35 trillion gallons
need only12% of this amount, and save only 3%.)
Now THAT's stupid!

If we don't care enough individually to select sensible, honest
politicians then our utility bils and taxes will coninue their steep rise.

But if we bother to sort and catalogue the many data bits I've posted
on the TOPIX and UT fourms from the files and opinions of federal
and state experts then we will see who is doing what to us and how
easily we can network with neighbors and friends to fix this problem.
-- If these are not suddenly removed by the persons who are raking
in $6 billion from us yearly through our governmen. They can dio this.

If we just keep letting "someone else do it" then we will continue to
pay the extortion of land-water-energy profiteers, more than $6,000
yearly per home and rising fast accoring to Univ CA economists.

We are only helpless if we choose to be.
Our families deserve better than that from us.
And our self-esteem demands much more.

jamsemarple66@yahoo dot com
james marple

San Diego, CA

#17 May 20, 2014
Zip
It appears that San Diego County voters simply don't understand
the law of Supply & Denand the same way profiteers do.
My many decades working with land developers showed they
know perfectly well that if the public demands plenty of pure water
and power at minimal cost then polticians will give them this.
So land developers of S California have concentrated on buying
news services to let them dictate choices of ccndidates.
This ensures majorities of foolish and corruptible politicians.
Do you know of any other explanation for politicians hiring Chief
Engineeers who can't or won't catch one of every 8 gallons of rain
so that we have all the pure, cheap water we want?

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Carlsbad Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
CA CA Proposition 23 - Global Warming (Oct '10) 31 min Tank ever 7,926
CA Judge overturns California's ban on same-sex ma... (Aug '10) 33 min landluber suck 200,576
Review: Artful Chefs Wed Pat Firestone-OC 1
Mysterious Lights Reported Above Oceanside Aug 26 Jaimie 3
CA California Proposition 19: the Marijuana Legali... (Oct '10) Aug 26 matches lighters 15,961
Stabbing in vista food 4less?? Aug 25 Beee 1
Black, clear and subs Aug 25 psychedelia88 2
•••

Beach Hazards Statement for San Diego County was issued at August 28 at 3:58PM PDT

•••
•••
Carlsbad Dating

more search filters

less search filters

•••

Carlsbad Jobs

•••
Enter and win $5000
•••
•••

Carlsbad People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

•••

Carlsbad News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Carlsbad
•••

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]
•••